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    Syria, Gaza and the Criminalisation of Islam (OP)


    Salaam

    Event: Syria, Gaza and the Criminalisation of Islam

    Recent events from the Middle East have placed the Muslim community in Britain in the public eye once more with their every word and action coming under microscopic scrutiny by the media and politicians. This is only the latest chapter in an ideological attack that has been ongoing for significantly longer.

    Whereas the attacks on Islamic concepts of war, political governance and the unity of Muslim lands are nothing new, they have now increased on an unprecedented scale in the wake of the rise of ISIS and its declaration of a Caliphate. The matter is not about supporting or opposing the version of a Caliphate as demonstrated by ISIS but rather the criminalisation of Islamic political thought and ideology. The concepts of jihad, shariah and khilafah are not the exclusive possession of ISIS but core Islamic doctrines subscribed to by almost one third's of the world's population. It is telling that the government's treatment of ISIS is similar to its treatment of Hamas, the Muslim Brotherhood, Hizb-ut Tahrir, and the Taliban, despite the enormous differences of belief and methodology between the groups.

    The Islamophobic nature of the criminalisation of those who believe in fighting in Syria against Assad is underlined by the lack of concern for British Jews who fight in the Israeli Occupation Forces, particularly at times where they are engaged in war crimes and other atrocities, such as the recent attack on Gaza.

    On the flips side, Muslims who wish to aid their brothers and sisters through the provision of humanitarian aid via aid convoys are having their homes raided, being harassed by the security services and are effectively being accused of engaging in terrorism. Charities are having their bank accounts closed without explanation and are coming under investigation by the Charity Commission simply for being involved in crisis zones like Gaza and Syria. Witch-hunts such as the Trojan Horse hoax and the mass hysteria over issues of the niqab, halal food and conservative Muslim values demonstrate that the criminalisation is spreading beyond Middle Eastern politics. Individuals and organisations within the Muslim community who have been speaking out against these policies are now under attack. They have had their organisation, business and bank accounts arbitrarily closed. Even their children's bank accounts have been closed. They are maligned in the media as terrorist sympathisers, extremists and jihadists. Some have even been imprisoned.

    The common element across all these cases is that those targeted cared for the oppressed and for those who are suffering. They have been criminalised because they cared.

    Join CAGE at this series of events around the country to unite the Muslim communities against this criminalisation of our faith, our beliefs, our mosques and organisations, and our leaders. The following regional events will take place with the large conference taking place on 20 September at the Waterlily in London.

    Sunday 14 September - 6pm

    Pakistani Community Centre, Park Hall, London Road, Reading RG1 2PA

    Jamal Harwood
    Dr Adnan Siddiqui
    Dr Uthman Lateef
    Anas al-Tikriti
    Taji Mustafa
    Wednesday 17 September - 7pm
    East Pearl Banqueting Centre, Longsight, Manchester
    Ibrahim Hewitt
    Abdullah Andalusi
    Jahangir Mohammed

    Friday 19 September - 6.30pm

    Muslim Student House (the Daar), Moseley, Birmingham

    Dr Uthman Lateef
    Ismail Adam Patel
    Abdullah Andalusi
    Dr Abdul Wahid
    Fahad Ansari

    http://www.cageuk.org/event/it-crime-care

  2. #521
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    Re: Syria, Gaza and the Criminalisation of Islam

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    Salaam

    More comment.





    The killing is not an act that as a Muslim I would approve. But while I believe in the freedom of expression, I do not think it includes insulting other people. You cannot go up to a man and curse him simply because you believe in freedom of speech.

    In Malaysia, where there are people of many different races and religions, we have avoided serious conflicts between races because we are conscious of the need to be sensitive to the sensitivities of others. If we are not, then this country would never be peaceful and stable.

    We often copy the ways of the West. We dress like them, we adopt their political systems, even some of their strange practices. But we have our own values, different as between races and religions, which we need to sustain.

    The trouble with new ideas is that the late comers tend to add new interpretations. These are not what the originators intended. Thus, freedom for women, meant the right to vote in elections. Today, we want to eliminate everything that is different between men and women.

    Physically we are different. This limits our capacity to be equal. We have to accept these differences and the limitations that are placed on us. Our value systems is also a part of human rights.

    Yes, sometimes some values seem to be inhuman. They cause some people to suffer. We need to reduce the sufferings.
    But not by force, if the resistance is great.

    The dress code of European women at one time was severely restrictive. Apart from the face no part of the body was exposed. But over the years, more and more parts of the body are exposed.

    Today a little string covers the most secret place, that’s all. In fact, many in the west are totally naked when on certain beaches.

    The West accepts this as normal. But the West should not try to forcibly impose this on others. To do so is to deprive the freedom of these people.

    Generally, the west no longer adhere to their own religion. They are Christians in name only. That is their right. But they must not show disrespect for the values of others, for the religion of others. It is a measure of the level of their civilisation to show this respect.

    Macron is not showing that he is civilised. He is very primitive in blaming the religion of Islam and Muslims for the killing of the insulting school teacher. It is not in keeping with the teachings of Islam.

    But irrespective of the religion professed, angry people kill. The French in the course of their history has killed millions of people. Many were Muslims.

    Muslims have a right to be angry and to kill millions of French people for the massacres of the past.

    But by and large the Muslims have not applied the “eye for an eye” law. Muslims don’t. The French shouldn’t. Instead the French should teach their people to respect other people’s feelings.

    Since you have blamed all Muslims and the Muslims’ religion for what was done by one angry person, the Muslims have a right to punish the French. The boycott cannot compensate the wrongs committed by the French all these years.

    https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1...233811970.html



    Khabibs reponse.



    More comment. Fearless and unapologetic as always.



    Responses to the video.

    Mognodor

    I'm French, and disrespect towards Islam is very normal, almost encouraged here. There really isn't a culture of free speech like in the USA, but when it comes to religion, you can be as mean as you want, even if it's for no reason other than being mean, provocative and disrespectful. This so called "freedom of speech" (freedom of insulting religion really) used to be practiced on every religion, but for the past few years it's been particularly targeted towards Islam and Muslims.

    Some people say horrible things about Muslims, spread their hatred of Islam, sometimes on TV, and they're given even more visibility for that. French people will understand very well what I'm talking about (Eric Zemmour). And those people act like they're being so subversive, so brave, when in reality it's become the norm in the media, to just insult Muslims, blame them for everything bad in the country. And when you point all this injustice out, people say that you're whining, or they say "we are allowed to do that and that because it's in the law", but in reality they only do those things to Muslims. Because Christians are the majority, and criticising Jews is kind of taboo in France.

    So yeah France really doesn't feel good to live in as a Muslim right now.




    More analysis.


    Blurb


    In the West hearing the word beheading, Islam and terrorism is scary. What's even more scary is how worse violence is not linked to faith or terrorism. This makes it seem like Islam has the copyright over terrorism. Only difference is the other are state backed and well marketed.

    Here I also present 6 cases where France didn't exercise freedom of speech when it came to Christians, Jews and others. Why are Muslims any different? (Memorise and share them)

    A good academic video on freedom of speech by academic Hamza Tzortzis: https://youtu.be/WtRvdFu8i7I

    If you are interested in learning more about Islam click here: https://onereason.org

    Follow and support work being done by CAGE and MEND.

    https://twitter.com/UK_CAGE
    https://twitter.com/mendcommunity




    The grass is not always greener on the otherside.







    It gets worse and worse.

    Last edited by Junon; 4 Weeks Ago at 10:11 PM.

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    Re: Syria, Gaza and the Criminalisation of Islam

    Salaam

    UAE leadership are backing Macron surprise surprise.



    UAE minister backs Emmanuel Macron’s remarks on Muslims

    Anwar Gargash rejects accusations against French president that he seeks to exclude Muslims.


    A prominent United Arab Emirates minister has called on Muslims to accept the stance of French President Emmanuel Macron on his claims about the need for “integration” in Western societies.

    “[Muslims] have to listen carefully to what Macron said in his speech. He doesn’t want to isolate Muslims in the West, and he is totally right,” Anwar Gargash, minister of state for foreign affairs, said in an interview on Monday with the German daily Die Welt.

    He said Muslims “need to be integrated in a better way” in Western nations.

    “The French state has the right to search for ways to achieve this in parallel with combating extremism and societal closure,” he added.

    Gargash rejected accusations against the French president that he seeks to exclude Muslims living in France.

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/...rks-on-muslims



    Meanwhile.

    ‘End to misunderstood tolerance’: Austria’s Kurz doubles down on vow to fight ‘political Islam’ following Vienna attack

    Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz has said he expects Europe to abandon what he called “misunderstood tolerance” in the wake of a terrorist attack in Vienna while calling for an EU-wide effort to combat “political Islam.”

    “I expect an end to the wrongly understood tolerance … in all European countries,” Kurz told Germany’s Die Welt newspaper, adding that the ideology of “political Islam” endangers “our freedom” as well as the very “European model of life.”

    The chancellor maintained that the issue is grave enough to require a Europe-wide response, adding that he already raised this topic in phone calls with many European leaders and also plans to make a fight against “political Islam” an issue on the agenda at the upcoming EU summits.

    Speaking to the Austrian media, Kurz also called a decision to release the Vienna attacker on parole “definitely wrong.” Earlier, the nation’s Interior Minister Karl Nehammer admitted that the Islamist radical that killed four people and injured 23 more in Vienna on Monday “tricked” a de-radicalization program overseen by the Justice Ministry.

    The perpetrator was earlier sentenced to 22 months in prison in April 2019 over swearing allegiance to Islamic State (IS, former ISIS) and attempting to join terrorists in Syria. Yet, he was released just some eight months later since he was no longer considered a threat.

    “Had he not been released from prison, a terrorist attack like this could not have happened,” Kurz admitted. Still, the chancellor also maintained that there is only “one culprit”“guilty” of this “barbaric, cowardly Islamist terrorist attack” and that is the assailant himself.

    In the wake of the Monday shooting, Kurz apparently sought to ease any potential tensions by saying it was “not a conflict between Christians and Muslims, or between Austrians and migrants” but between “civilization and barbarity.”

    https://www.rt.com/news/505444-austr...-islam-attack/

    Macron leads the way in defending freedom of speech. . . .oh wait. . . . . .

    Last edited by Junon; 3 Weeks Ago at 07:58 AM.

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    Re: Syria, Gaza and the Criminalisation of Islam

    Salaam

    Another update.

    Blurb

    There have been only a select few terror attacks that have made the headlines, take a guess why the others didn't.

    There is an active campaign against Islam, here we can see clearly with news from mainstream sites.




    More discussion.



    Macron being inconsistent, again. . . . .

    Last edited by Junon; 3 Weeks Ago at 08:33 PM.

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    Re: Syria, Gaza and the Criminalisation of Islam

    Salaam

    More comment.



    “The enemy within”: Is there a place for Muslims in France’s secular republic?

    “This terrorist wanted to kill the Republic, its values, the Enlightenment, the possibility to turn our children into free citizens. This fight is our fight, and it is an existential fight.” So President Emmanuel Macron announced to the nation in the wake of the murder of teacher Samuel Paty on 16 October 2020. Paty was beheaded by 18-year-old Abdullakh Anzorov, a Chechen refugee, following his use of Charlie Hebdo cartoons of the Prophet Mohamed as part of a classroom discussion on free speech.

    Just days later, there was another attack, this time inside the Basilica of Notre-Dame de Nice, where three people were killed by recently arrived Tunisian migrant, Brahim Aouissaoui. For many French people, already dealing with further COVID-19 restrictions, and the ongoing Charlie Hebdo trial, these attacks are the latest wound on the nation’s bruised body — and a bloody reminder that France remains a prime target for some Muslim extremists.

    In the wake of this latest paroxysm of violence, fierce public debates have re-ignited over the place and rights of Muslims in France, framed as part of an ongoing civilisational struggle between an “enlightened, beleaguered” France and a “regressive, violent” Islam — and this despite the fact that both of the most recent assailants were not actually French, and that French Muslims have also been among the victims of similar attacks.

    At a time when working with Muslim communities to root out those who seek to harm us all is most urgent, the French state has persisted with a strategy which casts the net of suspicion so widely that it risks designating all religious Muslims as suspect citizens and fuelling the very binaries off which extremists feed. Worse still, in the name of a truncated version of republican values, this strategy risks undermining the core principles of the French state itself.

    Caught in the middle of this illusory “clash of civilisations” narrative are regular Muslims, whose everyday practices — from wearing a headscarf to donning full-body swimming attire — were already in the nation’s crosshairs, and who are now facing tougher restrictions in the name of national security. Even halal shopping aisles are the latest Muslim “threat” to the republic in the firing line, while the new law on “separatism” is set to include a five-year prison sentence for those who request a physician of the same sex.

    Some academics are pushing back against charges of “islamo-facism” being wielded by the French education minister. According to the interior minister, France is fighting a “culture war” — but to many Muslims, this feels more like a witch-hunt.

    Whose freedom of speech?

    Freedom of speech — the purported right to express the unpalatable — has effectively been sacralised in blood by the French government, through the institutionalisation of support for Charlie Hebdo, itself once a fringe, gratuitously offensive publication, now a litmus test of French Muslim patriotism. Claims of “freedom of speech” are currently being used as a form of “virtue signalling” by the same people who publicly support the suppression of the marginal voices, from comedians to rappers, and others who challenge the elite consensus.

    In a measure of just how far this debate has strayed, in 2015 a French court had to adjudicate that “white people” do not represent a component of national identity after a rapper and a sociologist were accused of “anti-white racism” by a far-right Christian group on the grounds of “public injury”. By June this year, almost half of those surveyed said they accept the concept of “anti-white” racism, popularised by Marine Le Pen and other ideological movements on the far-right.

    This victimhood narrative among the white majority, which began as a fringe movement, today serves to deflect from real issues of discrimination facing minorities, and is reflected in current debates over the principle of freedom of speech. The strategy, it seems, is no longer to commit to tolerating voices on the margins, but rather to weaponise a reified version of the principle in order to suppress the very groups it was meant to protect. As the French lawyer Nicolas Gardères stated back in 2018:

    [I]f the far right defends freedom of speech, it’s so it can be more openly racist. They hate Jews and want to be able to say that Blacks and Arabs are less intelligent and should be sent “back” …

    Make no mistake, freedom of speech does permit and protect voices which are deeply offensive, morally challenging, and upsetting. It doesn’t require the whole of society to approve of them, nor for the state to incorporate them into the defining markers of national identity. But that’s the point of free speech: it allows space for such views to be expressed, as long as they do not incite violence.

    Free speech isn’t about defending cartoons now republished globally, or about projecting those cartoons onto government buildings in a display of state-sanctioned Islamophobia. It is certainly about the right, in principle, to publish such images. But it’s also about the right to voice opposition to those cartoons without risking criminalisation. It’s about the freedom to publish images of police wrongdoing without being prosecuted (as in the case of Loan Torondel), or to teach the full picture of colonial history, or to protest against the government’s environmental policies without fear of reprisal.

    The truncated version of free speech currently being touted as a key republican value is applied in a politically self-serving way, leading some to question the underlying motives — particularly when compared to the limits imposed on such principles when it comes to other aspects of French political and social life.

    Last week, the French Council of Ministers dissolved one of the largest Muslim charities in France, BarakaCity, on the grounds that it “incites hatred and justified terrorist acts” — claims that are based in part on social media posts which appeared to support a parent-led campaign against Samuel Paty. Anxiously awaiting a similar fate is the largest anti-Islamophobia organisation in France, the Collectif contre l’islamophobie en France (CCIF), which has been branded an “enemy of the republic” by the government, and yet is one of the few vocal groups pushing back against discrimination. Its loss would mean even less oversight and chronicling of instances of Islamophobia, in a country which has seen the number of Islamophobic acts more than double in just one year. CCIF has recently announced its decision to go into exile in order to escape the punitive environment which risks halting their work in France entirely.

    The weaponisation of laïcité

    France is, undoubtedly, a nation under attack — the question is: by whom, and why? President Macron has focused on the danger of what he calls “Islamic separatism”: a “politico-religious project, which is materialised by repeated discrepancies with the values of the republic.” The fact this term seems largely defined in opposition to republican values, themselves evolving and often nebulous, raises some concern that the term can simply be used to criminalise those deemed not to subscribe to the prevailing, mutable conception of those values.

    Similarly, on the day after Samuel Paty’s murder, French Prime Minister Jean Castex told a group of teachers, “Secularism, the backbone of the republic, has been targeted through this despicable act.” But was it?

    This transformation and manipulation of laïcité into an illiberal legal tool to restrict religious freedom has allowed elite public discourse to constantly question Muslim loyalty to France and debate whether or not Muslims can be good French citizens.

    Although much of the public conversation assumes that Muslims are the ones eroding republican values, it isn’t Muslims who are seeking to change or challenge France’s longstanding republican edifice — it is the French secularist majority who are attempting to weaponise these values in order better to target Muslims, which may be the very definition of discrimination.

    Consider this: not only did a 2016 study find that two-thirds of French Muslims believe laïcité allows them to practise their religion, but the same study also found that the majority of French Muslims do not see their understanding of “religion” as being in conflict with France’s republican framework. So why are some parts of the government pushing to change the definition of secularism, and with it the purportedly immutable republican values it claims to uphold?

    Societal laws and the values that undergird them are constantly evolving, but for them to evolve fairly — which is to say, democratically — they must evolve in consultation with those groups they most directly affect. These laws must reflect a degree of social consensus, not be the result of governmental fiat. After all, this is no longer the colonial era in which the French could simply impose their “civilisational” values on the colonised “other” — is it?

    I suspect the government’s current conception of laïcité would be utterly unintelligible to the torchbearers of the French revolution, who fought both for the strict separation of Church and State, and for freedom of religion from state intrusion. What would they make of President Macron’s latest plans for the French state to train Muslim faith leaders and bring mosques under tighter government control? The government’s own website on the meaning of laïcité states unequivocally that the free practice of religion is guaranteed, and that “laïcité is not an opinion, but the freedom to have one — it is not a conviction, but the principles which allows all opinions to exist, within the limits of the law.” At a time when a politicised, weaponised version of the term — formulated explicitly in opposition to Islam and Muslims — has become the measure of French patriotism, this struggle over terminology reveals a wider struggle over the very soul of France.

    The struggle within France

    Some might argue that the erosion of civil liberties in France in the wake of the November 2015 terror attacks in Paris poses the true existential challenge to the republic. Muslims may be first in the firing line, but such precedents set the tone for future violations of what was previously perceived as inviolable.

    The state of emergency laws that held sway between 2015 and 2017 were widely criticised by human rights organisations for affording security services exceptional powers, including “the ability to place anyone deemed to be a security risk under house arrest, dissolve groups thought to be a threat to public order, carry out searches without judicial warrants and block any websites that ‘encourage’ terrorism.” The UN Committee against Torture raised concerns regarding allegations of excessive use of force by police during searches, and special rapporteurs warned of “excessive and disproportionate restrictions” on fundamental human rights. While Muslims bore the brunt of this legislation, such excesses were also used against leftist groups. The state of emergency ended in 2017, but there has been little scrutiny since of how these practices have eroded public trust and human rights.

    Last year, as part of ongoing anti-terrorism measures, President Macron announced a list of “weak signs of radicalisation” to which authorities were told to be alert. The list makes for glacial reading. It includes ordinary aspects of Muslim religious practice, such as “growing a beard”, “praying regularly”, “greater religiosity during Ramadan”. Those “concerned” were advised to call a free government number — over 68,000 did. The list fuelled a McCarthyite witch-hunt in which any signs of religiosity could, and sometimes did, lead to Muslims being denounced to the authorities.

    Just last year, Amnesty International called on French authorities to respond to growing discrimination against French Muslims. It reminded the French government to “beware of presenting Muslims as a suspect group through focusing on the practises of one religion, which should be protected in law, as a security risk.” And yet, in the wake of these recent attacks, this is exactly what has begun to happen once again.

    Among worrying trends highlighted by Amnesty was the decision by the French senate to ratify a law prohibiting individuals from accompanying school outings from wearing “visible signs of religion” — legislation clearly understood to be targeting Muslim women in headscarves. In August 2018, the Human Rights Committee of the United Nations concluded that the restriction on the right to wear a headscarf by an employee at a private crèche constituted an attack on the employee’s religious freedom, defying French rulings on the matter. The reality is that French Muslims are now having to seek justice in international courts, because justice at home is in short supply.

    This struggle for the French republic isn’t being fought between Islamist fanatics and the French public, but between the new France — a multi-ethnic, multi-religious nation which embraces its range of identities and beliefs under the republican banner, and internalises the notion of laïcité as a principle for the articulation of diversity— and the old elites, desperately clinging to power, drawing on nativist tropes to justify the two-tier republic and the exclusion of those who might challenge their monopoly on power and wealth.

    Figures within the French government are increasingly pressing the Observatoire de la laïcité, a state-funded body tasked with protecting secularism, to change the meaning of the term laïcité (“secularism”) to more closely align with their desire for increasingly severe restrictions on Muslim religious practises. Such legal challenges are not new: at least since 1989, when the so-called Affaire du Foulard (“headscarf affair”) in French schools first erupted, the French government effectively has been at war with its own institutions over the meaning of fundamental French principles. Crucially, however, the parts of the population most directly and adversely affected by each proposed set of new laws are rarely, if ever, consulted.

    Just this week, forty-nine public figures, from philosophers to journalists and professors, signed a public letter calling on the government, among other things, to create new state institutions to enforce secularism. But not only do such institutions already exist, their voices are most often drowned out because they refuse to bow to public and political pressure to instrumentalise laïcité against the very minorities republican principles were meant to protect. As the French legal scholar Rim-Sarah Alouane has observed:

    The French terror

    The history of the French republic is marked by the struggle to keep at bay state intrusion into the sphere of the individual — our personal, sacred space, wherein resides our deepest convictions and foundational beliefs. It is freedom which the French constitution guarantees as inalienable to all its citizens, and yet, today, it is this guarantee that is most under threat.

    Since January 2020, the French government has shut down 73 mosques and Islamic schools. It has undertaken more than 120 searches of individual homes; it has implemented the dissolution of associations accused — often on scant evidence and without the opportunity for appeal — of spreading “Islamist rhetoric”; and it has applied considerable pressure on social media companies to police content. It has now rendered very normal markers of religiosity suspect and in so doing, linked ordinary Muslims to criminal and terrorist activity.

    The erosion of civil liberties always begins at the margins, with minorities, but it creates the conditions for profound shifts in the relationship between the state and civil society. The “exceptions” contain within them the possibility of becoming the “rule”. At this moment, France is claiming to fight an amorphous enemy in the name of republican principles it itself is simultaneously undermining. And in so doing, it is ultimately fomenting rifts within French society which render the struggle against the very real threat of terrorism, much harder. According to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights on Counter-terrorism:

    Respect for human rights and the rule of law must be the bedrock of the global fight against terrorism. This requires the development of national counter-terrorism strategies that seek to prevent acts of terrorism, prosecute those responsible for such criminal acts, and promote and protect human rights and the rule of law. It implies measures to address the conditions conducive to the spread of terrorism, including the lack of rule of law and violations of human rights, ethnic, national and religious discrimination, political exclusion, and socio-economic marginalization …


    In France, as in other countries, terrorism has been used to justify “exceptional” legislation which has resulted in repressive measures being used to stifle the voices of human rights defenders, journalists, minorities, and civil society. The new “security state” has redirected resources normally allocated to civil society programmes, thereby effectively weakening their ability to assist at the grassroots level. Media debates bang on relentlessly about “separatism” and the “threat” of political Islam, while referencing ordinary aspects of Muslim religious life, with no consideration of the effect such rhetoric has on community relations, and on Muslims — whom the French Interior Minister recently referred to as “the enemy within.”

    It is worth recalling that state terrorism was born during the French revolution. As Guillaume Ansart has argued, “The Terror” marked the first time a government attempted to institute what he calls a “despotism of freedom” — to base “a regime of terror on the universal values of liberty and equality.” He notes that two of the most infamous laws from this period were “the Law of Suspects” — which called for the arrest of all “those who, by their conduct, associations, comments, or writings have shown themselves partisans of tyranny or federalism and enemies of liberty” — and the Law of 22 Prairial Year II — which marked the culmination of the Terror, and broadened the notion of “enemy of the people” to such an extent that every citizen critical of the government could potentially be included in that category. “The Terror” was defined by this imposition of national unity through the criminalisation of any who dared critique its functioning. As a nation, we must do better than fall back into the terror of our darker times and meet the darkness of those who threaten our safety with the light of our shared humanity.

    Today, France finds itself in a new period of “terror” in which terrorism poses grave threats: one form of terrorism threatens the peace and safety of the people; the other, a form of political terrorism, threatens the very fabric of society. Both are dangerous, but there is only one which truly represents an existential threat to the nation.

    https://www.abc.net.au/religion/plac...ublic/12848512





    Last edited by Junon; 3 Weeks Ago at 10:16 AM.

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    Re: Syria, Gaza and the Criminalisation of Islam

    Salaam

    What else should be expected from the UAE leadership?







    Comment.



    Hah at least their honest about their intentions.



    Last edited by Junon; 3 Weeks Ago at 05:08 AM.

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    Re: Syria, Gaza and the Criminalisation of Islam

    Salaam

    Another update.


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    Re: Syria, Gaza and the Criminalisation of Islam

    Salaam

    And the mask continues to come off. The French are preparing for a mass conversion campaign.



    Macron: Muslim organisations must say Islam is not a political movement

    French President Emmanuel Macron has demanded that Muslim organisations sign up to a charter which proclaims that “Islam is a religion and not a political movement.”

    According to French media, the charter must recognise the “values of the Republic” and put an end to foreign involvement in French mosques.

    Macron has given the French Council of Muslim Worship (CFCM) two weeks to draw up a charter of “republican values” its member organisations and affiliates will be expected to comply with, as part of his efforts to centralise the formation and accreditation of Muslim religious leaders in the country.

    During a meeting on Wednesday evening with a number of French Muslim leaders, including CFCM president Mohammed Moussaoui and Chems-Eddine Hafiz, Macron tasked the national Muslim body with filing a draft of the charter.

    “This is historic,” a statement from the presidency quoted by French media read. “This has been in discussion for decades.”

    “I put my trust in you and you are beholden to my trust,” Macron told the CFCM members on Wednesday. “If some do not sign this charter, we will draw the consequences from that.”

    Created in 2003 under then-interior minister Nicolas Sarkozy, the CFCM is a federation of Muslim religious organisations in France. It has since become the principal interlocutor of the government with regards to issues of organised Islam in France.

    It remains unclear what exact consequences will face imams and organisations that do not abide by the future charter.

    In early October, Macron sparked controversy during a speech in which he called Islam “a religion in crisis” and vowed to crack down on alleged Muslim “separatism”.

    Paris’s plans have since intensified following the killing of a schoolteacher and an attack in the city of Nice that left three dead that same month.

    A draft law on “separatism” is expected to be presented to the cabinet on December 9.

    Demonstrations also took place across the Muslim world denouncing France’s stance on Islam and calling for boycotts of France.

    https://5pillarsuk.com/2020/11/19/ma...ical-movement/

    Freedom of speech in action. . . . . . .



    Lots of comment and analysis.

    The biggest con ever 'secularism' was neutral.





    More comment.



























    Usual hypocricy



    What a surprise.





    This shouldnt surprise anyone.





    The future? I hope not.




    Last edited by Junon; 1 Week Ago at 04:54 PM.

  11. #528
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    Re: Syria, Gaza and the Criminalisation of Islam

    Salaam

    As serious as the situation is, heres some hunour to lighten us up in these dark times.

    Blurb

    French PM Macron has packaged his tirade against Islam and Muslims with the convenient label of "Freedom of speech" but here he owned himself (if he hasn't done so, many times before).


  12. #529
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    Re: Syria, Gaza and the Criminalisation of Islam

    Salaam

    Once again we see the French governments dedication to freedom of speech, oh wait. . . . .



    France demands that Pakistan withdraws Macron Nazi jibe

    Row escalates over images of the Prophet Mohammed by a French magazine


    France's foreign ministry is demanding that Pakistan withdraws comments made by one of its ministers that President Emmanuel Macron was treating Muslims like the Nazis had treated Jews in the Second World War.

    The comments were posted on Twitter on Saturday by Pakistan's Federal Minister for Human Rights Shireen Mazari.

    The re-publication of images of the Prophet Mohammed by a French magazine in September sparked anger and protests in the Muslim world, especially in Pakistan.

    "Macron is doing to Muslims what the Nazis did to the Jews – Muslim children will get ID numbers (other children won't) just as Jews were forced to wear the yellow star on their clothing for identification," Ms Mazari tweeted.

    In a follow-up tweet on Sunday, Ms Mazari restated her claims after a condemnation by France's foreign ministry late on Saturday.

    "These hateful words are blatant lies, imbued with an ideology of hatred and violence," said France's foreign ministry spokeswoman, Agnes von der Muhll.

    "Such slander is unworthy of this level of responsibility. We reject them with the greatest firmness."

    She said that Paris had informed the Pakistan embassy of its strong condemnation of the comments.

    "Pakistan must rectify these remarks and return to the path of a dialogue based on respect," she said.

    After the latest remarks, Ms Mazari later deleted her earlier tweet.

    Pakistan's parliament at the end of October passed a resolution urging the government to recall its envoy from Paris, accusing Mr Macron of "hate-mongering" against Muslims.

    Mr Macron had paid tribute to a French history teacher who was beheaded by an 18-year-old man of Chechen origin for showing cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed in a class on freedom of speech.

    French officials called the beheading an assault on the core French value of freedom of expression.

    After satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in September re-published the cartoons it first published in 2015, Mr Macron said the freedom to blaspheme went hand in hand with the freedom of belief in France.

    https://www.thenationalnews.com/worl...jibe-1.1115744



    More analysis.

    Blurb

    On November 18, President Macron issued an ultimatum to Muslim leaders to accept a "charter of republican values," including a ban on political action from Muslim groups. Speaking to TRT World, civil liberties activist Yasser Louati believes the future of French Muslims lies in their capacity to stand against oppression.

    Last edited by Junon; 1 Week Ago at 11:37 PM.

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  14. #530
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    Re: Syria, Gaza and the Criminalisation of Islam

    Salaam

    The scholar for dollars give judgement.



    Comment.











    Whats at stake.





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