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    Muslim Prisoners (OP)


    The Nature of Torture

    Torture practices include beatings such as jumping on the victim’s stomach; falacca or falanga, which involves beating the soles of the feet with rods; telephono, where the torturer claps flattened palms over the victim’s ears rupturing the tympanic membrane in the process; the use of electricity, including tying victims to a metal bed before applying a current and the use of pointed electrodes placed on the victim’s genitalia; burning; submarino, the submersion of the victim’s head in dirty water until the point of suffocation is almost reached; rape and forced sexual assault; suspension in mid-air with knees bent over a rod and tied tightly to wrists; deprivation of water; fake executions; the forced witnessing of the torture of the victim’s family or children; being held incommunicado; sensory deprivation; the forced injection of psychotropic drugs or ‘faecal matter’.

    Tortured in Syria by Italy

    Mohammed Majid Shakir was tortured by the Syrians under the command of the Italians. He explains the torture methods used upon him by the Syrians.

    “Their instruments of torture were :-

    a. Blasphemy. They insulted Allah(swt), his messenger(saw), and tore up the Qu’ran

    b. Beating with sticks. They attacked me with a hard stick, and if I tried to defend myself they attacked me harder. Whilst this was happening, I could hear the screams of the other brothers, and they haunt me still to this day.

    c. In the winter, in the cell of torture the brothers were tied to a chair by their hands and feet, and into a cell that was freezing. They put an electric fan on us in our faces from morning to afternoon” (Help the Prisoners, 2010)

    Tortured in Baghram

    Moazzam Beg narrates his experience in Baghram prison, he states, “One particular month in May, I was subjected to some extremely harsh interrogation techniques, which included being – or having my hands tied behind my back to my legs like an animal, as they call in America ‘hogtied’, with a hood placed over my head so I was in a suffocating position, kicked and beaten and sworn at and spat at, left to rot in this position for hours and hours on end and taken again into interrogation, and this lasted over a period of over a month. That wasn’t the worst of it, of course. The worst of it for me was the psychological part, because all of this time I had no communication with my family at all. I didn’t know what happened to my wife or my children. For all I knew they could have done terrible things to them. And that was my biggest fear. (Moazzam Begg, quoted in Democracy Now!, 2006)

    Torture in Abu Ghraib

    In 2004, the world witnessed the shocking institutionally sanctioned torture of Iraqi prisoners by US soldiers in Iraq’s Abu Ghraib prison. The vile images of grinning American soldiers standing over shackled, naked and hooded Iraqi men in demeaning, sexually humiliating and contorted positions stunned the liberal conscience of the Western world. Rather than the aberrant behaviour of an isolated few, it became clear that the nine soldiers who were court-martialled for the crimes were indeed responding to orders issued from the highest levels of military government.

    Death at Camp Delta

    On June 9, 2006, three detainees died while in custody at Camp 1 of the Guantánamo Bay detention facility. Yassar Talal Al Zahrani, Mani Shaman Turki Al Habardi Al Tabi, and Ali Abdullah Ahmed were reported to have been found hanging in their cells at approximately 00:20 on June 10. According to descriptions from the guards, medics, and autopsy reports, all three detainees were cold to the touch, bluish in colour, and in a state of rigor mortis, indicating that each had been dead for more than two hours at the time of discovery. Their eyes were rolled back in their sockets and they had no pulse. Rigor mortis locked their jaws and impeded resuscitation attempts. In the case of one detainee, his jaw had to be pried open with a metal instrument that broke his teeth. At that time, medical personnel discovered that he had a cloth deep in his mouth and down his throat. The same condition was discovered in the other two bodies. The investigations did not explain why the detainees had rags in their throats (Death in Camp Delta, 2009).

    Guantanamo Bay

    Binyamin Mohammed recalls his experience of prison in Guantanamo Bay, “It is still difficult for me to believe that I was abducted, hauled from one country to the next, and tortured in medieval ways – all orchestrated by the United States government…There are thousands of other prisoners held by the US elsewhere around the world, with no charges, and without access to their families. And I have to say, more in sadness than in anger, that many have been complicit in my own horrors over the past seven years. For myself, the very worst moment came when I realised in Morocco that the people who were torturing me were receiving questions and materials from British intelligence (BBC News, 23rd February 2009)

    Implications of Torture

    There are a significant amount of detention centres around the world, specifically designed to torture victims. Cruel and callous methods of torture render the victims as helpless and in many cases, ultimately causing their deaths. The victims of torture are owed one thing above all else: justice. The perpetrators of torture must be exposed for who they are, and for what they have done. There is no statute of limitations on inhumanity. Those who designed and implemented the torture and illegal rendition programmes must be punished for their crimes or the laws forbidding these activities will be recognised as meaningless. These inhumane acts were committed against real people. Only the victims can forgive those who violated their human rights and stained the moral consciousness of humanity.
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    Re: Muslim Prisoners

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    Make du'aa for the Prisoners during these blessed days of Ramadhaan In Sha Allaah.
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    Muslim Prisoners

    I Will Never Forget You.

    [Please DO NOT like or rep my posts, Jazakumullah Khairan]

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    Re: Muslim Prisoners

    Quote Originally Posted by Indefinable View Post
    Make du'aa for the Prisoners during these blessed days of Ramadhaan In Sha Allaah.
    Jazakallahu khairan for bringing this to our attention.
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    Re: Muslim Prisoners

    .....
    Muslim Prisoners

    I Will Never Forget You.

    [Please DO NOT like or rep my posts, Jazakumullah Khairan]

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    Re: Muslim Prisoners

    ​Make du'a for the Muslim Prisoners In Sha Allaah.
    Muslim Prisoners

    I Will Never Forget You.

    [Please DO NOT like or rep my posts, Jazakumullah Khairan]

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    Re: Muslim Prisoners

    The CIA paid psychologists $81 million to devise brutal tactics for use on terror suspects, and they're suing


    Erin Brodwin
    Jun. 22, 2017, 1:30 PM


    After a doctor X-rayed one prisoner's badly broken feet, his colleague gave interrogators the go-ahead to force him to stand for 52 hours.

    They were employed in an $81-million dollar CIA interrogation program which ran for at least seven years under the Bush administration beginning in 2002.

    Public documents suggest it was led by two military psychologists, John Bruce Jessen and James Mitchell, whose techniques are widely seen as torture.

    A lawsuit filed in 2017 by the American Civil Liberties Union on behalf of former prisoners shines new light on the grisly details of the tactics the doctors approved for use on terrorism suspects in an attempt to extract information from them after the events of September 11, 2001. These tactics, which range from water-boarding to "walling" — a method that involves pushing a person into a flexible plywood wall so hard that it creates a disturbing sound that pierces the ear — are widely considered torture by experts.
    Mitchell, Jessen & Associates

    In 2002 after CIA officials approached them with a request for techniques to obtain information from potential terrorist suspects, Mitchell and Jessen met in a cubicle, sat at a typewriter, and typed out a list, they said in a new video deposition obtained by the New York Times.

    The methods they listed included sleep deprivation and waterboarding, and were essentially reverse-engineered from techniques psychologists had trained US soldiers to use to resist interrogations.

    Mitchell and Jessen also used a psychological theory outlined by Martin Seligman to make detainees more pliable, according to the 2014 Senate report. The theory, called "learned helplessness" describes how people who are subjected to pain and suffering give up trying to escape once they begin to see a situation as beyond their control.

    In 2014, Seligman told The Times he was "grieved and horrified" to hear that his work had been used in connection with the brutal interrogations.
    Other doctors embedded in the CIA program

    While Jessen and Mitchell allegedly designed the program, dozens of other medical professionals oversaw and participated in it.
    james mitchellJames Mitchell speaks on Fox News. Fox News
    "The torture could not proceed [without] medical supervision," Atul Gawande, a surgeon and author, wrote on Twitter shortly after the Senate report on the CIA program was made public. "The medical profession was deeply embedded in this inhumanity."

    Doctors, physician's assistants, and a team of medical officers were present for the interrogations throughout every step of the process, according to the Senate report.

    The Office of Medical Services, the agency designed to advise the US State Department on health issues, was responsible for deciding when detainees' injuries were healed enough to allow interrogators to resume their brutal tactics. Physicians told CIA officers what temperature water they should use to waterboard detainees and suggested they use saline solution instead of plain water so as to not risk prisoners being killed by water poisoning.
    Doctors' increasing involvement

    Research suggests that since Sept. 11, medical professionals have been increasingly involved in assisting the government in crafting its violent interrogation techniques.

    In a 2004 essay in the New England Journal of Medicine, Robert Jay Lifton, a Harvard trauma expert who served as an Air Force psychiatrist, wrote that American doctors were involved in the torture at Abu Ghraib, an US-run detention center in Iraq.

    They "were part of a command structure that permitted, encouraged, and sometimes orchestrated torture to a degree that it became the norm — with which they were expected to comply," Lifton wrote. "Even without directly participating in the abuse, doctors may have become socialized to an environment of torture and by virtue of their medical authority helped sustain it."

    Worse still, he wrote, is that "the participation of doctors can confer an aura of legitimacy and can even create an illusion of therapy and healing."

    A 1991 review of torture by medical professionals in the Journal of Medical Ethics came to a similar conclusion. "Individual factors may have been of importance for motivation," the authors write, "but far more important seems to have been the organisation of the system."

    In a book released in October, New York Times reporter James Risen said that the American Psychological Association worked with the Bush administration for years to provide cover for its torture methods. In 2015, the association released an official statement condemning the enhanced interrogation techniques and saying they were "independently reviewing" Risen's allegations.
    Do brutal techniques help the CIA get information?

    The Senate report firmly concluded that the abusive techniques outlined in the report did not help the CIA obtain reliable information, citing that out of 119 prisoners who were tortured, 26 were wrongfully detained.

    Mitchell himself suggested in an interview with Vice News that the way the program was being applied meant that no intelligence came directly from the interrogation techniques themselves, but instead from a sort of game of "good cop, bad cop," that officials played with detainees.

    "I would be stunned if they found any kind of evidence that would suggest that Enhanced Interrogation Techniques as they were being applied yielded actionable intelligence," Mitchell said in a video interview in 2014.


    https://www.businessinsider.com/cia-...logists-2017-6

    - - - Updated - - -

    11 Popular Songs the CIA Used to Torture Prisoners in the War on Terror

    By Tom Barnes
    April 22, 2014

    Imagine you are chained with your hands between your legs, crouching. You're isolated in a small, dark room with earphones you can't take off. Queen's "We Are the Champions" has been playing on repeat for 30 hours now at full volume, and you've lost your ability to think. It could go on for months.

    Music torture has been common practice for the CIA ever since it began its "enhanced interrogation program" in the early 2000s. The process is designed to "create fear, disorient … and prolong capture shock" in prisoners.

    Sgt. Mark Hadsell, a member of the U.S. Psychological Operations team, described the efficacy of the tactic: "If you play it for 24 hours, your brain and body functions start to slide, your train of thought slows down and your will is broken. That's when we come in and talk to them."

    Any torture method is of debatable merit — music torture was, in part, popular because it seemed more palatable to the public. But to hear about the experience of people who've been subjected to these songs is to see just how terrible it is to have a beloved song turned against you.

    Here are 11 songs that have been turned into torture devices.



    1. "The Real Slim Shady" by Eminem

    Binyam Mohamed suffered Eminem's "Slim Shady" for 20 days.

    "I heard this nonstop over and over," he reportedly told Clive Stafford Smith, his lawyer and the founder and director of Reprieve, a U.K-based organization determined to end music torture practices. "The CIA worked on people, including me, day and night for the months before I left. Plenty lost their minds."

    Mohamed said he could hear others in the prison "screaming and smashing their heads against walls."
    2. “Take Your Best Shot” by Dope

    British citizen Ruhal Ahmed described the process in a 2008 interview with Reprieve investigators: "I can bear being beaten up, it's not a problem. Once you accept that you're going to go into the interrogation room and be beaten up, it's fine. You can prepare yourself mentally. But when you're being psychologically tortured, you can't."

    He said he had been exposed to the torture "numerous times" to a variety of music. "It makes you feel like you are going mad. You lose the plot, and it's very scary to think that you might go crazy because of all the music, because of the loud noise and because after a while you don't hear the lyrics at all, all you hear is heavy banging."
    3. "Dirrty" by Christina Aguilera

    Mohammed al Qahtani, the alleged 20th hijacker of the 9/11 attacks, reportedly received this torture as part of a much larger "musical theme" set up for him. The soldiers dubbed the "bad Muslim" theme.

    The continuous cacophony of Aguilera's sexually charged pop anthem was one of several practices meant to make it impossible for him to be an observant Muslim man. Many inmates suffered humiliations like this: Female military personnel would go shirtless during interrogations, give forced lap dances and rub red liquids they identified as menstrual blood on detainees.
    4. "Zikrayati (My Memories)" by Mohamed el-Qasabgi

    As part of the "bad Muslim" theme, interrogators sometimes used more familiar music, hoping to exploit Muslim cultural taboos and guilt involved with enjoying music on certain ascetic holy days.

    Interrogators played Arabic music for al Qatani on the first day of Ramadan on Dec. 7, 2002. Hearing the familiar instruments, he cried out "that it was a violation of Islam law to listen to Arabic music."

    This actually isn't Quaranic law; it is more of a cultural precept. Investigators warned al Qatani that it was a sin "to add prohibitions not mentioned in the Qur'an (as he seemed to be doing)."

    Al Qatani still insisted "music was forbidden" and broke down stating "he could do nothing about the music that was played in the [interrogation] booth."
    5. "Babylon" by David Gray

    Military personnel apparently used Gray's soft rock ballad in their tortures because of the biblical connotations of its title. While interviewing former prisoners, German musicologist Christian Gruny played this song for a Guantanamo inmate, who immediately burst into uncontrollable sobs.

    Building off Gruny's research, Suzanne Cusick elaborates that music torture operates by stripping a prisoner of a safe, "interior space." It invades with the sounds and cultural expressions of one's captor and leaves a prisoners with nowhere to hide to "escape the pain."

    This is the reason why U.S. soldiers used a lot of patriotic music like Neil Diamond's "America" or Don McLean's "American Pie."
    6. "I Love You" by The Barney Theme

    This one is especially sick. It's reportedly the most "overused" torture song in the CIA's arsenal.

    Apparently, the song's creator Bob Singleton "just laughed" when he heard of its use: "It seemed so ludicrous that something totally innocuous for children could threaten the mental state of an adult. I would rate the annoyance factor to be about equal with hearing my neighbour's leaf blower. It can set my teeth on edge, but it won't break me down and make me confess to crimes against humanity."

    Granted, he's never heard it blasted at ear-splitting volumes for weeks at a time.
    7. "Saturday Night Fever" by the Bee Gees

    Pakistani-Englishman Moazzam Begg, arrested by the CIA in Pakistan in 2002, wrote one of the most comprehensive memoirs describing the tortures he witnessed in the U.S. military prison system. During his stay at Bagram, Afghanistan, he suffered the Bee Gees.

    He thought it was a joke at first: "Once they even played the Bee Gees' Saturday Night Fever soundtrack all night long. 'Hardly,' I thought,'‘enough to break anyone I knew.' ... 'We'll talk. We'll all talk,' I said in half jest when they played it, 'just turn that crap off please!'"

    But as the torture began to stretch on, it became unbearable. "It was terrible, there was no light at all, it was so tight, so hot, sitting in there. You can't see or do anything, nothing to see, nobody to talk to, nothing to do but bang the walls. And then to have the music blasting ... I met several people who'd been in there ... [who were] ready to tell the Americans anything they wanted, whether it was true or not."
    8. The Meow Mix theme

    The whole idea behind music torture is to create a method of torture that does not seem offensive to the public.

    The above "Saturday Night Fever" is some of this "publicly palatable" music. Investigative reporter Justine Sharrock also singles out the Meow Mix theme song: "You almost have to stop yourself from laughing because you realize this is actually torture." After a particularly long heavy metal session the sudden shift in dynamics this song heralds can be especially maddening.
    9. “The Beautiful People” by Marilyn Manson

    Begg, the man who was forced to listen to disco, said he was not as unnerved by the music torture as others. The men who suffered most were those coming from more rural parts of Afghanistan and Yemen, who had never been exposed to Western music before. They received the most horrifying introduction imaginable.

    The worst part of the whole ordeal for Begg was the sleep disruption. "Sometimes it would stop at 3 a.m. or so, but your ability to sleep was already disturbed. You lose the ability to have a routine sleep. ... The other thing that they did was play the music at various times ... the random aspect of when it would start or end was frustrating, makes you tired, agitated, upset, on top of all the other situations of not knowing when you're going to be released, interrogated, or moved to those cells.

    "Many people suffered from various kinds of anxiety attacks. People hyperventilated, losing control of their senses, hitting their bottle of water against the cell, against other people, trying to scrape their hands against the concertina wire, sometimes breaking down and crying."
    10. "F#ck Your God" by Deicide

    Music torture often had significant effects on U.S. military personnel as well.

    Tony Lagouranis, a former U.S. Army interpreter, almost lost it one day while interrogating a prisoner who had been receiving some very heavy metal: "As Umar knelt, we took turns yelling our questions into his ears. His head twisted around as he tried to figure out where we were. After about a half hour, he started moaning. I imagined he was crying behind his sandbag. We pushed forward, getting harsher with our words. My throat was sore, my ears were ringing, and the lights were disorienting. I realized I wasn't going to be able to stand this much longer.

    "The music and the lights were making me increasingly more aggressive. The prisoner, still not cooperating, was making me increasingly angry."

    Another night: "Khalid was right where I left him, calm and serene. When I looked at him, the anger surged, amplified by the flashing lights and the booming noise. A thought flashed through my head: 'Chop his ----ing fingers off.'" Lagoruias was immediately revolted that the thought had even suggested itself. He left Khalid's fingers whole.
    11. “We Are the Champions” by Queen

    U.S. Navy veteran Donald Vance suffered this torture after the U.S. Army raided the Iraqi security firm he had been investigating as an unpaid FBI informant.

    When all the employees were rounded up, he was treated as a suspect, taken to an unofficial prison camp and tortured with song.

    Vance would catch himself singing along to songs he liked. "I can't remember how many times I heard Queen's "We Are the Champions.'"

    Vance survived due to his military training. He started to talk to himself, telling himself jokes, trying to keep a rational train of thought going. He knew if he let the music completely "mask his thoughts," he would never get his mind back again. This method is likely what helped Vance emerge from this prison a "damaged" but not "broken" man.

    https://m.mic.com/articles/87851/11-...-war-on-terror

    - - - Updated - - -

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    Re: Muslim Prisoners



    Truth will always come out. Now or in another 100 years time. Patience is key.
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    Muslim Prisoners

    Pain and hardships allow you to grow spiritually Alhamdulilah so smile when a so called calamity befalls upon you.
    Alhamdulilah Allah swt is the greatest.

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    Re: Muslim Prisoners

    Salaam

    Another update

    Children of Guantanamo



    Children of Guantanamo: An exhibition of drawings, letters and soundscapes by the children of detainees held in Guantanamo Bay. This exhibition explores their experiences and how they have captured meaning from the indefinite captivity of their fathers. Children of Guantanamo focuses, for the first time, on the children whose voices are not heard in discussions on Guantanamo Bay.

    For 16 years, while men have been detained at Guantanamo Bay, their children have grown in a world of uncertainty –never knowing if they can speak to their fathers or knowing if they will see them again. A number of these children were born after their fathers were captured, and in some cases despite a seventeen-year absence, have never met them. The fathers and their children communicate through letters and drawings that have to go through several layers of security checks before reaching their loved ones. Often, parts of the letter or drawing have been redacted with no explanation.

    The drawings and letters in this exhibition are displayed anonymously. This is to protect the identities of the children and their families. This exhibition intends to spur discussion and thought about the children who are bound together by their common experience of having their fathers in captivity in the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay. This exhibition is not about their fathers, and it is not about the specificities of each father’s case. Children of Guantanamo is about the children who have been affected as a result of incarceration in the so-called War on Terror, as well as presenting an opportunity for all of us to consider the wider impact of indefinite detention.

    Children of Guantanamo is the result of a collaborative effort between the John Adams Project of the ACLU and Postprint Magazine. The exhibition was curated by Charles Shields and Luz Damian. Special thanks to Angelina Dreem and Marium Begg.

    https://www.childrenofguantanamo.com/about-2

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    Re: Muslim Prisoners

    Salaam

    This is related. On the impact of drone warfare.


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    Re: Muslim Prisoners

    Salaam

    Another update.



    Blurb

    Episode 6 of our podcast 'Declassfied'. Here Moazzam Begg and I discuss his experience in the US Guantanamo prison, his torture experiences, his faith shaking moments, his faith building moments and more.



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