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    cutting diplomatic ties with Qatar

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    Assalamualaikum,

    what is happening in Qatar?

    http://edition.cnn.com/2017/06/05/mi...ons/index.html

    May Allah forbid Muslims devide and unite the Ummah.
    | Likes Alamgir, Junon, talibilm liked this post

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    Re: cutting diplomatic ties with Qatar

    seems like the saudis, UAE, Egypt dont like Qatar.
    cutting diplomatic ties with Qatar

    Do you think the pious don't sin?

    They merely:
    Veiled themselves and didn't flaunt it
    Sought forgiveness and didn't persist
    Took ownership of it and don't justify it
    And acted with excellence after they had erred - Ibn al-Qayyim

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    Re: cutting diplomatic ties with Qatar

    Yes, Maledives and Bahrain either.

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    Re: cutting diplomatic ties with Qatar

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/05/w...ates.html?_r=0

    MIDDLE EAST

    5 Arab States Break Ties With Qatar, Complicating U.S. Coalition-Building
    By ANNE BARNARD and DAVID D. KIRKPATRICKJUNE 5, 2017
    Doha, Qatar. Five Arab nations have suspended diplomatic relations with Qatar and ordered their citizens to leave the country. Credit Yoan Valat/European Pressphoto Agency
    BEIRUT, Lebanon — Egypt, Saudi Arabia and three other Arab countries severed all ties with Qatar early Monday, in a renewal of a four-year effort to isolate it and in a sign of a new boldness after a visit to the region by President Trump.

    In an abrupt and surprising move, the five Arab states not only suspended diplomatic relations, as they have in the past, but also cut off land, air and sea travel to and from Qatar. All but Egypt, which has many thousands of people working there, ordered their citizens to leave the country.

    Qatar, like other monarchies in the Persian Gulf, is a close ally of Washington, and it hosts a major American military base that commands the United States-led air campaign against the Islamic State.

    As such, the feud among regional allies threatens to stress the operations of the American-led coalition and complicate efforts in the region to confront Iran — but could also be a heavy blow to Tehran’s regional ambitions, if Qatar is forced to sever ties.


    Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson offered to broker the impasse on Monday in the hope of preserving the Trump administration’s efforts to create broad coalitions against Iran and terrorist groups in the Middle East.

    “We certainly would encourage the parties to sit down together and address these differences,” Mr. Tillerson said.

    The severing of all connections by Bahrain, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Yemen created an immediate crisis for Qatar. Qatari diplomats were given 48 hours to leave their posts in Bahrain, while Qatari citizens were allotted two weeks to depart Bahrain, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

    President Trump in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in May. Mr. Trump’s strong support for the Saudis may have helped encourage other Sunni states to renew their campaign against Qatar. Credit Stephen Crowley/The New York Times
    Qatar, a relatively small country jutting into the Persian Gulf, has a border with Saudi Arabia and is vulnerable to its larger neighbor. It imports almost all of its food, about 40 percent of it directly from Saudi Arabia. Several residents, reached on the internet chat, said that people were stocking up on food and cash.

    Air traffic was disrupted, with the United Arab Emirates suspending service to Qatar by its three carriers, Etihad Airways, Emirates and FlyDubai, beginning Tuesday morning. Qatar Airways was banned from Saudi airspace.

    Saudi Arabia said it was taking the action to “protect its national security from the dangers of terrorism and extremism.” The Foreign Ministry of Qatar released a statement saying the action had “no basis in fact” and was “unjustified.”

    The Iranian government criticized the Saudi-led action against Qatar in a diplomatically worded rebuke. “Neighbors are permanent; geography can’t be changed,” Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif said on his Twitter account. “Coercion is never the solution,” Mr. Zarif said. “Dialogue is imperative, especially during blessed Ramadan.”

    It was not immediately clear why the five countries decided to take this action now. Last month, Qatar’s state news media published comments attributed to the emir, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani, referring to tension with Washington over Iran policy and saying Mr. Trump might not be in power for long. Qatar denied the comments, saying it had been the victim of a “cybercrime.”

    But most analysts pointed to President Trump’s recent visit to Saudi Arabia.

    Yezid Sayigh, a senior fellow at the Carnegie Middle East Center in Beirut, Mr. Sayigh said that the new moves reflected a “bullishness” prompted by the Trump administration’s stances — on the confrontation with Iran and on a willingness to look the other way on human rights violations.

    Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates are getting “no U.S. pushback” on human rights or on the Yemen intervention, he said, while “Egypt also feels off the hook with Trump, and is using the opportunity to repair ties with the Saudis, reinforce with the Emiratis and be more assertive in Libya.”

    But the move also creates potential complications for the United States — raising questions about whether the Trump administration knew it was happening; if they understood the pitfalls; if they attempted to counter it and could not.


    By The New York Times
    “The question is what if anything will this administration do about it?” said Randa Slim, a regional analyst at the Middle East Institute in Washington. “Was it forewarned and did not have the staffing needed to mount an intelligent pre-emptive action? Going forward, will the U.S. put brakes on the escalation path? Or let it move forward?”

    She said that an escalation against Qatar was not a surprise given the brewing tension: “Regionally, the decks are stacked against Qatar. If denied U.S. support, the Qatari emir has no option but to back down.”

    But the move carries perils for the other countries as well, Mr. Sayigh warned. “Cutting relations with Qatar suggests a worrying readiness to be assertive and belligerent,” he said. which masks the countries’ deeper problems and challenges and may prove to be a case of overreach.”

    In another indication of how the Trump visit may have emboldened Gulf monarchies, Bahrain has cracked down on opposition from its Shiite majority over the last two weeks.

    Qatar, one of the richest countries in the world, has used that wealth in recent years to play an outsize role in regional politics. It has often sought to be the honest broker, trying to mediate the region’s intractable conflicts. But just as often, it has ended up angering all sides.

    Its actions are a study in contradictions. Qatar has good relations with Iran, but hosts the American air base, is helping to fight the Iranian-backed Houthi rebels in Yemen and supports insurgents against the Syrian government of President Bashar al-Assad, which is backed by Tehran. And yet, the Qatari emir once gave Mr. Assad an Airbus plane.

    Home to some Israeli officials, Qatar has also given refuge to Khaled Mashal, a leader of Hamas, the hard-line Islamist group in Gaza that advocates the destruction of Israel.

    Tensions had been building for years, beginning with Qatar’s support for the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt and through the broadcasts of the Pan-Arab news network Al Jazeera, which Qatar funds. Qatar’s rivals have also faulted it for condoning fund-raising for militant Islamist groups fighting in Syria, although several of the other Sunni-led monarchies in the region have played similar roles.

    Photo

    The Al Udeid Air Base in Qatar last year, home of the American-led air war against the Islamic State. Credit Tech. Sgt. Terrica Y. Jones/U.S. Air Force, via Reuters
    Qatar’s opponents have recently added a third allegation to those grievances: that it is conspiring with their regional rival, Iran. That latest charge is especially striking given Qatar’s role in the fighting against the Houthis in Yemen and the Assad government.

    Qatar has had its successes. It has taken an important back-channel role with Iran to defuse points of contention in the Syrian war. It has repeatedly brokered hostage and prisoner exchanges, paying millions of dollars to insurgent groups in the deals.

    Qatar is also a sponsor of the Four Towns agreement in Syria, negotiated with Iran and Hezbollah, in which civilians trapped under siege by government troops or by rebel forces have been bused to other areas. The deals are hailed by some as the only way to rescue civilians, but they have been derided by others as forced displacements.

    However the crisis is resolved, if at all, Mr. Tillerson and Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, who appeared in their first joint news conference, in Sydney, Australia, after talks with their Australian counterparts, insisted that it would not undermine the fight against the Islamic State, also known as ISIS or ISIL.

    “I am confident there will be no implications,” Mr. Mattis said.

    But the escalating confrontation between Qatar and other Sunni-led Arab states presents a fresh and unwelcome complication for the United States military, which has made strenuous efforts to forge a broad coalition against the Islamic State.

    How, for example, can the American-led air campaign include warplanes from Bahrain, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates if those governments will no longer allow their military representatives to be based at, or even to visit, a major United States command center?

    Beyond the military difficulties, several multinational corporations have operations in the feuding nations. A Saudi call for companies to withdraw from Qatar could present international executives with a difficult choices about where to do business.

    Qatar is hosting the 2022 World Cup, for instance, and is building facilities for the tournament that are part of an ambitious construction boom, including creating branches of major international museums and universities.

    About 80 percent of Qatar’s residents are foreign workers, including white-collar professionals and construction and service workers. There are several hundred thousand Egyptians working in Qatar, which is perhaps why Cairo did not call for its citizens to leave like Saudi Arabia did.

    Anne Barnard reported from Beirut, Lebanon, and David D. Kirkpatrick from London. Gardiner Harris and Michael R. Gordon contributed reporting from Sydney, Australia, and Rick Gladstone from New York.

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    Re: cutting diplomatic ties with Qatar

    The hypocrisy of those Arab nations also has no boundaries..

    Turkey I believe this year or last year ..when Erdogan went to those gulf states and was asked how they see Muslim brotherhood..they said we do not see them as a "terrorist organization"..that being said they also have been supporting ISIS and other groups that by so called norm of those Arab nations fall in the categorie of "terrorist groups" and also now and then Turkey is having good relations with Iran for own political interest.

    So how come those hypocrite Arab nations also are not severing all ties with Turkey?..

    There is something else going on ..maybe when the so called "Arab NATO" was being created that Qatar suddenly did not want to be part of it. Or something else that we are not aware of it.

    Do know Qatar is absolutely not the friendly country one might think of. However I am glad what just happened not because what has happened but what we see are the dogs that run along...

    When 1 country did severe ties suddenly all the other dogs followed in the sense of 1 country severed ties all those other countries followed...from Egypt to parts of Libya to UAE to Bahrain to Maldiven etc..

    This also has happened back then when severing ties with Iran. With this it is clear who is the puppet master that the rest of the countries follow. If the puppet master falls In anarchy the rest will follow.

    So this information is good to analyze and conclude political strategies of the Middle East and also beneficial for looking at the end times.

    Edit:

    I was reading another article about this whole thing and I remembered something else. Qatar how small it even may be it has a lot of influence ..how?. Al-Jazeera. If you have a stray dog that does not want to listen but has a certain ability to turn your own people against you this certainly is dangerous for dictators.

    This I believe has happened. As Qatar did not want to be part of the pack but through media they can influence things ..by severing ties those hypocrite dictator Arab countries can also ban Qatar media sure such as Al-Jazeera.

    This for example also has happened with RT and Sputnik. The west brands them as propaganda however if CNN/NBC/FOX etc are not also propaganda then I am not sure what is the definition of propaganda. RT and Sputnik (Russian media) tell the opposite side of the stories and also talk about things corrupt western politicians don't want you the civilian to know of. This off course can lead to people being educated and not be manipulated like sheep.
    Last edited by Simple_Person; 06-06-2017 at 06:48 AM.

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    Re: cutting diplomatic ties with Qatar

    The reason is because Qatar funded and supported Hamas, a group designated by many Muslim nations as a terrorist organization.

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    Re: cutting diplomatic ties with Qatar

    Quote Originally Posted by Mustafa16 View Post
    The reason is because Qatar funded and supported Hamas, a group designated by many Muslim nations as a terrorist organization.
    With each topic we advance, i want to have less discussion with you and rather just ignore you in general. All you are good at is repeating what they themselves are saying =_=!. It doesn't work like that.

    What is being said in public is for the public to know, the real reason is only known to them, the one they are doing that to knows the reason, other countries know the reason...but NONE of them tells you the real reason. Everybody keeps their mouth shut.

    However you yourself time after time just want to stick to what they are telling you. I know you are young, but that doesn't mean you have to blindly follow what they are telling you especially if other people give you a different perspective for you to include in your analyzing of the situation.

    If we follow your logic, then Iraq had WMD and they were also "found". However later on we hear other things that prisoners were being tortured in to wanting to know where the Mahdi is..or 9/11 you think most probably this was done by some guys in caves in Afghanistan =_=!.

    Anyways, if you do not ponder about what i or even other people here are saying including some other Turks. I might not agree with them either with lets say 50% of the things they say, but the remaining 50% i can agree with them. Then for you and me..consider this the last time i respond to a comment of yours.
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    Re: cutting diplomatic ties with Qatar

    Quote Originally Posted by Simple_Person View Post
    With each topic we advance, i want to have less discussion with you and rather just ignore you in general. All you are good at is repeating what they themselves are saying =_=!. It doesn't work like that.

    What is being said in public is for the public to know, the real reason is only known to them, the one they are doing that to knows the reason, other countries know the reason...but NONE of them tells you the real reason. Everybody keeps their mouth shut.

    However you yourself time after time just want to stick to what they are telling you. I know you are young, but that doesn't mean you have to blindly follow what they are telling you especially if other people give you a different perspective for you to include in your analyzing of the situation.

    If we follow your logic, then Iraq had WMD and they were also "found". However later on we hear other things that prisoners were being tortured in to wanting to know where the Mahdi is..or 9/11 you think most probably this was done by some guys in caves in Afghanistan =_=!.

    Anyways, if you do not ponder about what i or even other people here are saying including some other Turks. I might not agree with them either with lets say 50% of the things they say, but the remaining 50% i can agree with them. Then for you and me..consider this the last time i respond to a comment of yours.
    Ignore me then. I've been ignoring you anyway. You always come up with what, in my opinion, are ludicrous conspiracy theories that blame everything on the West. I'd rather trust the West and the UN with my life then I would an Islamist with my laundry. And many displaced, tortured, persecuted, abused, and humiliated, starved, and besieged people around the world would agree with me.

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    Re: cutting diplomatic ties with Qatar

    Quote Originally Posted by Simple_Person View Post
    With each topic we advance, i want to have less discussion with you and rather just ignore you in general. All you are good at is repeating what they themselves are saying =_=!. It doesn't work like that.

    What is being said in public is for the public to know, the real reason is only known to them, the one they are doing that to knows the reason, other countries know the reason...but NONE of them tells you the real reason. Everybody keeps their mouth shut.

    However you yourself time after time just want to stick to what they are telling you. I know you are young, but that doesn't mean you have to blindly follow what they are telling you especially if other people give you a different perspective for you to include in your analyzing of the situation.

    If we follow your logic, then Iraq had WMD and they were also "found". However later on we hear other things that prisoners were being tortured in to wanting to know where the Mahdi is..or 9/11 you think most probably this was done by some guys in caves in Afghanistan =_=!.

    Anyways, if you do not ponder about what i or even other people here are saying including some other Turks. I might not agree with them either with lets say 50% of the things they say, but the remaining 50% i can agree with them. Then for you and me..consider this the last time i respond to a comment of yours.
    Believe I've heard all of your arguments, and I actually used to believe in it. But I don't anymore. And keep in mind, I was born and raised in America, and I'm proud of it.

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    Re: cutting diplomatic ties with Qatar

    Quote Originally Posted by Mustafa16 View Post
    Ignore me then. I've been ignoring you anyway. You always come up with what, in my opinion, are ludicrous conspiracy theories that blame everything on the West. I'd rather trust the West and the UN with my life then I would an Islamist with my laundry. And many displaced, tortured, persecuted, abused, and humiliated, starved, and besieged people around the world would agree with me.
    People around the world (majority), do not believe in Allah as how Islam portrays Allah. So just because majority does that, doesn't mean they are right and how you show those "displaced, tortured, persecuted, abused, and humiliated, starved" as if the Muslim world is responsible for it. The people that are responsible you do not want to look at facts but you keep your eyes closed. The problem is not your brain or eyes..it is your heart. Because me or even Turks that on certain subject we can agree upon say things based on certain facts..but all you tend to do is emotionally follow "oooh Gulen is prosecuted oooh all the injustice and Trump/Obama are my heroes i will gladly sacrifice my life for them". You do not want to see and acknowledge. Do not go to extremes..control yourself and seek the balance which is clear from extremes.

    The BIGGEST mistake you make in your life and you will pay dear for it if you do not take a moment to question yourself before you die. The world we live in today 2 sides are being shown that we "HAVE" To choose from.

    Side 1: The west/UN + (Dictators in Middle East etc.) side

    You sound like you have been a student of US presidents..."if you do not choose our side you are with them". Who said i am with the other extremist groups? That is your problem dude you look at things very black and white, while it isn't so black and white as how you look at it.

    "O you who have believed, do not take the Jews and the Christians as allies. They are [in fact] allies of one another. And whoever is an ally to them among you – then indeed, he is [one] of them. Indeed, Allah guides not the wrongdoing people." Qur'an 5:51

    The west now a days that fits the picture Allah tells us in this aya.

    Side 2: Groups like Al-Qaeda, ISIS, Boko haram, etc. etc. also tell you..if you are not with us, you are with them.

    "Beware of going to extremes (in religion), for those before you were only destroyed through excessiveness."

    Source used: http://dailyhadith.adaptivesolutions...n-Religion.htm

    I tend to listen to what Allah and His Rasul(saws) teaches me to follow.

    If you follow Allah and His rasul(saws), Allah shows you a 3rd choice. To depict both of them as terrorist and abstain from both of them. I point at both of their actions and look at Islam tells me about it. I also do not see problems, i see solutions. That is why i time after time bring up how come the corrupt western politicians are the core of the problem what we are having. However you do not have intellectual input how come i am wrong and based on what i may be wrong. Just some emotional reaction..cry me a river as if they (side 1 that you have sided with) will cry for you when you have died. While Rasullah(saws) back then was crying for his Ummah that would experience these end times.

    Anyways..ALHAMDULILLAH..you will end up in your own grave and i will end up in my own grave. You will have to answer for your actions and me for mine.

    Also majority of my life i also have lived in the west, but i tend to question things and not follow blindly of what is going on.

    Btw, for people who say..ooh look "he says do not take Christians and Jews as allies"..no i am not saying that. There are AMONG Jews and Christians..the ones that stand up and speak the truth. The ones that do not fear prosecution. Those are my brothers and sisters. The ones that i am talking about that should not be taken as friends and allies are the ones are pushing for the coming of Jesus Christ ...in other words try to destroy the world so he could come back. And then you have the Zionists. There are Jews that are ANTI-Zionist state. Those Jews are my brothers and sisters just like those Christians who have those same views.

    So ask yourself who am i?
    Last edited by Simple_Person; 06-06-2017 at 10:42 AM.

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    Re: cutting diplomatic ties with Qatar

    Ma'qal bin Yasar reported that the messenger of Allah said: "Prayer (Ibadah) at the time of turmoil is like migration (Hijrah) towards me." (Muslim)

    'Omar bin al - Khattab reported that the messenger of Allah said:
    "Troubles will afflict my people in latter days from their rulers.
    None will escape from them except one who recognises Allah's religion and then fights for it with his tongue, hand and heart, and his reward will already be sure; and one who recognises the religion of Allah and holds on to it; and one who recognises the religion of Allah and keeps quiet about it - if he sees somebody who does good, he loves him, and if he sees somebody who does wrong, he is angry with him, he will be saved for all that he kept secret. (Baihaqi)






    Qatar hosts largest US military base in Mideast
    By Brad Lendon, CNN

    Updated 0600 GMT (1400 HKT) June 6, 2017

    Al Udeid Air Base hosts more than 100 US aircraft
    Planes take off or land at air base every 10 minutes, 24/7, Air Force says
    (CNN)As Saudi Arabia, along with a growing list of other countries, cut diplomatic ties with Qatar on Monday, it called on its allies to cease all travel and transport with its neighbor.

    One of Saudi Arabia biggest allies, however, is the United States, which also happens to maintain its biggest concentration of military personnel in the Middle East at Qatar's Al Udeid Air Base.
    The sprawling base 20 miles southwest of the Qatari capital of Doha is home to some 11,000 US military personnel.

    -------


    List of Qatar wars - alliances and opponents:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List...nvolving_Qatar


    ----------

    Kuwait's ruler travelled to Saudi Arabia on Tuesday for talks with King Salman over a Gulf Arab dispute with Qatar, Gulf Arab officials said.

    Kuwait's emir, Sheikh Sabah Al Ahmad Al Jaber Al Sabah, is acting as a mediator between Doha and other Arab states which have severed diplomatic and transport ties with Doha.

    Saudi Arabia, Egypt, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain cut diplomatic relations with Qatar on Monday in a coordinated move, accusing the peninsula of supporting "terrorists" and Iran.


    WATCH: Qatar's foreign minister talks to Al Jazeera about diplomatic crisis (12:39)

    Yemen's internationally recognised government also cut ties with Qatar, accusing it of working with its enemies in the Iran-aligned Houthi movement, state news agency Saba reported.

    The Maldives and Libya's out-of-mandate Prime Minister Abdullah al-Thinni later joined the Arab nations in saying they too would cut ties.

    Sanctions include shutting down transport links, including closing borders, airspace and maritime territories, which led to fears of supply shortages.

    In an interview on Monday with Al Jazeera, Foreign Minister Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdulrahman Al Thani said Kuwait's ruler, Sheikh Sabah Al Ahmad Al Jaber Al Sabah, had asked Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, Qatar's ruling emir, to hold off on giving a speech about the crisis late on Tuesday night.

    "He received a call from the emir of Kuwait asking him to postpone it in order to give time to solve the crisis," Sheikh Mohammed said.

    READ MORE: Qatar diplomatic crisis - All the latest updates

    Sheikh Sabah called on Qatar's ruler to focus on easing tension and advised against making decisions that could escalate the situation, Kuwait state news agency Kuna said.

    Still, the Qatari foreign minister struck a defiant tone, saying his nation rejected those trying to impose their will or intervene in its internal affairs.

    Kuwait, Oman 'fear escalation'

    Analyst Giorgio Cafiero of Gulf State Analytics, a geopolitical risk consultancy based in Washington, DC, told Al Jazeera: "I think the Kuwaitis as well as Omanis ... fear the prospects of these tensions escalating in ways which could undermine the interest of all six members of the GCC.

    "There are many analysts who believe that a potential break-up of the GCC has to be considered right now."

    He added that if tension escalates, some have warned of a "military confrontation".

    "If these countries fail to resolve their issues and such tensions reaches new heights, we have to be very open to the possibility of these six Arab countries no longer being able to unite under the banner of one council," said Cafiero.

    READ MORE: Qatar diplomatic crisis - How it affects air travel

    The dispute between Qatar and the Arab countries escalated after a recent hack of Qatar's state-run news agency. It has spiralled since.

    As it cut ties on Monday, Saudi Arabia charged that Qatar was embracing "various terrorist and sectarian groups aimed at destabilising the region," including the Muslim Brotherhood, al-Qaeda, the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL, also known as ISIS) and armed groups supported by Iran in the kingdom's restive east.

    Egypt's Foreign Ministry accused Qatar of taking an "antagonist approach" towards Cairo and said "all attempts to stop it from supporting terrorist groups failed".

    Qatar denied the allegations, with a Foreign Ministry statement describing them as "baseless" on Monday.

    The group issuing sanctions on Doha "is clearly the imposition of guardianship over Qatar, which is in itself a violation of its sovereignty, and is rejected outright," the statement said.

    The move came just two weeks after US President Donald Trump visited Saudi Arabia and vowed to improve ties with both Riyadh and Cairo to combat "terrorism" and contain Iran.

    US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said the move was rooted in long-standing differences and urged the parties to resolve them.


    WATCH: US says Trump 'committed to resolving' Gulf Arab diplomatic crisis (1:56)


    "It is true that the current US administration is adopting to have a bit more Saudi position distant from Qatari position," Richard Weitz, a senior fellow and director of the Center for Political-Military Analysis at Hudson Institute, told Al Jazeera

    "But I still think that the US military contacts can play a good role to help resolve, perhaps, some of the difference, since US military particular want an end to this dispute because of the difficulties to find a space and terrorism cooperation and so on."

    The Gulf countries ordered their citizens out of Qatar and gave Qataris abroad 14 days to return home to their peninsular nation, whose only land border is with Saudi Arabia. The countries also said they would eject Qatar's diplomats.

    READ MORE: Timeline of GCC, Egyptian discord with Qatar

    The nations also said they planned to cut air and sea traffic. Trucks carrying food had begun lining up on the Saudi side of the border, apparently stranded. The Qatar Stock Exchange fell more than seven percent in trading Monday.

    Qatar Airways, one of the region's major long-haul carriers, has suspended all flights to Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Egypt and Bahrain until further notice.

    On its website, the carrier said the suspension of its flights would take effect Tuesday and customers are being offered a refund.

    The route between Doha and Dubai is popular among business travellers and both are major transit hubs for travellers between Asia and Europe.


    INSIDE STORY: What's behind the diplomatic breakdown in the Gulf? (25:00)
    Source: Al Jazeera and news agencies

    http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2017/0...100203072.html




    Deep in the Gulf waters between Qatar and Iran lies the world's largest gas field, a 9,700-sq-km expanse that holds at least 43 trillion cubic metres of gas reserves.

    Qatar's southern portion is known as North Field, while Iran's slice to the north is called South Pars. The two countries share exploration rights in the area, and it is one of many ties that bind them.

    But Doha's relationship with Tehran has been put to a new test on Monday, after Iran's regional rival Saudi Arabia led four other countries in cutting diplomatic ties with Qatar, accusing its fellow Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) member of undermining security in the region by siding with Iran, among other actions.

    Saudi also urged "all brotherly countries and companies" to follow its lead in isolating Qatar, a call that GCC members Kuwait and Oman have so far sidestepped.

    Saudi Arabia has claimed that Qatar is supporting "Iranian-backed terrorist groups" in the Saudi province of Qatif and in Bahrain, accusations that Doha called a "campaign of lies that have reached the point of complete fabrication".

    What's behind the diplomatic breakdown in the Gulf?

    Riyadh also said "authorities in Doha" have supported the Iran-backed Houthi armed group in Yemen. This despite Qatar's deployment of an estimated 1,000 troops to support the two-year Saudi-led campaign there.

    In an editorial published on Monday, The National newspaper owned by the United Arab Emirates (UAE) government also denounced Qatar's "false friendship" citing the "close ties between Doha and Tehran".

    "Iran's actions in the Middle East have cost Doha's Arab neighbours blood and treasure," the editorial said, adding "the regime across the Arabian Gulf is no friend to Doha".

    Al Jazeera senior political analyst Marwan Bishara, however, said the accusation "does not hold water", noting Abu Dhabi also maintains diplomatic relations with Tehran.

    "And yet it prefers to sever its relationship with Qatar, rather than with Iran," he said.

    In a separate statement, the Qatari Cabinet said the measures taken by the five countries against Doha were "unjustified".

    "The aim is clear and it is to impose guardianship on the state. This by itself is a violation of its [Qatar's] sovereignty as a state."


    Residents of Qatar welcome Saudi King Salman during his visit to Doha in December 2016 [Reuters]
    Independent foreign policy

    Souzan Krdli, a Tehran-based Gulf analyst, said more than demanding Doha's allegiance, Saudi and the UAE want to "rein Qatar in" and make it "another Bahrain if you will" in terms of foreign policy.

    "Saudi and the UAE have always been troubled with Qatar's outreach and ambitious diplomacy," she told Al Jazeera.

    Krdli, who previously worked at Qatar University, said Doha's relationship with Tehran reflects the country's attempt since 1995 "to carve a policy that is independent of its neighbours".

    "This independence was an objective in itself, as well as a means to secure sovereignty" in the face of its larger neighbours, primarily Saudi with whom Qatar has had territorial disputes as recent as 1992, she said.

    "The continuation of this independent foreign policy means banking on the economic and diplomatic ties Qatar has forged through investment, natural gas export, diplomacy and mediation."


    In the middle of the current rift with Saudi, Krdli said Qatar is also "obliged" to maintain "a middle position" with Iran because of its shared gas exploration in the Gulf.

    Krdli also noted, unlike previous disputes, when Qatar took immediate conciliatory actions to Saudi and the UAE, Doha is taking a more "defiant" stand this time.

    Along with the decision by Saudi to cut diplomatic ties with Qatar, Riyadh has also decided to block air, sea and land transport links.

    There have been reports of trucks carrying food shipments from Saudi Arabia being blocked at the Qatari border.





    FEATURES QATAR13 HOURS AGO


    Qatar-Gulf rift: The Iran factor
    Saudi-led severance of diplomatic ties with Qatar tests unity among GCC members as leaders call for dialogue.
    Middle East analyst says if the Gulf crisis goes on it will only empower Iran in the region [Reuters]
    by
    Ted Regencia
    Deep in the Gulf waters between Qatar and Iran lies the world's largest gas field, a 9,700-sq-km expanse that holds at least 43 trillion cubic metres of gas reserves.

    Qatar's southern portion is known as North Field, while Iran's slice to the north is called South Pars. The two countries share exploration rights in the area, and it is one of many ties that bind them.

    But Doha's relationship with Tehran has been put to a new test on Monday, after Iran's regional rival Saudi Arabia led four other countries in cutting diplomatic ties with Qatar, accusing its fellow Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) member of undermining security in the region by siding with Iran, among other actions.

    Saudi also urged "all brotherly countries and companies" to follow its lead in isolating Qatar, a call that GCC members Kuwait and Oman have so far sidestepped.

    Saudi Arabia has claimed that Qatar is supporting "Iranian-backed terrorist groups" in the Saudi province of Qatif and in Bahrain, accusations that Doha called a "campaign of lies that have reached the point of complete fabrication".

    What's behind the diplomatic breakdown in the Gulf?

    Riyadh also said "authorities in Doha" have supported the Iran-backed Houthi armed group in Yemen. This despite Qatar's deployment of an estimated 1,000 troops to support the two-year Saudi-led campaign there.

    In an editorial published on Monday, The National newspaper owned by the United Arab Emirates (UAE) government also denounced Qatar's "false friendship" citing the "close ties between Doha and Tehran".

    "Iran's actions in the Middle East have cost Doha's Arab neighbours blood and treasure," the editorial said, adding "the regime across the Arabian Gulf is no friend to Doha".

    Al Jazeera senior political analyst Marwan Bishara, however, said the accusation "does not hold water", noting Abu Dhabi also maintains diplomatic relations with Tehran.

    "And yet it prefers to sever its relationship with Qatar, rather than with Iran," he said.

    In a separate statement, the Qatari Cabinet said the measures taken by the five countries against Doha were "unjustified".

    "The aim is clear and it is to impose guardianship on the state. This by itself is a violation of its [Qatar's] sovereignty as a state."


    Residents of Qatar welcome Saudi King Salman during his visit to Doha in December 2016 [Reuters]
    Independent foreign policy

    Souzan Krdli, a Tehran-based Gulf analyst, said more than demanding Doha's allegiance, Saudi and the UAE want to "rein Qatar in" and make it "another Bahrain if you will" in terms of foreign policy.

    "Saudi and the UAE have always been troubled with Qatar's outreach and ambitious diplomacy," she told Al Jazeera.

    Krdli, who previously worked at Qatar University, said Doha's relationship with Tehran reflects the country's attempt since 1995 "to carve a policy that is independent of its neighbours".

    "This independence was an objective in itself, as well as a means to secure sovereignty" in the face of its larger neighbours, primarily Saudi with whom Qatar has had territorial disputes as recent as 1992, she said.

    "The continuation of this independent foreign policy means banking on the economic and diplomatic ties Qatar has forged through investment, natural gas export, diplomacy and mediation."


    In the middle of the current rift with Saudi, Krdli said Qatar is also "obliged" to maintain "a middle position" with Iran because of its shared gas exploration in the Gulf.

    Krdli also noted, unlike previous disputes, when Qatar took immediate conciliatory actions to Saudi and the UAE, Doha is taking a more "defiant" stand this time.

    Along with the decision by Saudi to cut diplomatic ties with Qatar, Riyadh has also decided to block air, sea and land transport links.

    There have been reports of trucks carrying food shipments from Saudi Arabia being blocked at the Qatari border.

    Mediation not escalation

    Sadegh Ghorbani, Tehran-based journalist covering foreign policy, told Al Jazeera the regional tension is "not welcome by Iran".

    "However, it is clear that a rift in the GCC can be beneficial to Iran," he said. "Saudi Arabia is a lifeline for Qatar in terms of trade. We must wait and see whether Iran and Turkey can fill the void."

    Already, Iran has offered food shipments to Qatar. Reza Nourani, chairman of Iran's union of agricultural exporters, said such transfers can reach Doha in 12 hours.


    What's behind the diplomatic breakdown in the Gulf? – Inside Story
    Earlier, Iran's foreign ministry spokesman Bahram Ghasemi called for a "clear and explicit dialogue" among the feuding parties, saying tensions would only threaten the interests of everyone in the region.

    His statement reflected the social media posts of Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif who wrote, "Neighbours are permanent; Geography can't be changed. Coercion is never the solution. Dialogue [sic] is imperative, especially during blessed Ramadan."

    Mahjoob Zweiri, a Middle East expert at Qatar University, told Al Jazeera's Folly Bah Thibault that third party mediation is necessary to resolve the "crisis" immediately.

    He said Saudi Arabia and its allies cannot leave Qatar without any other options by forcing it to choose sides.

    "This is a scenario that will not lead to a solution. If this goes on, this will empower Iran in the region. I don't think Riyadh wants this," Zweiri, a doctorate graduate from the University of Tehran, said.

    "I think if there is no mediation, if there is no third party intervening, I think we could see more escalation in this crisis."

    Source: Al Jazeera News

    http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/fea...102522955.html

    -----------------


    Qatar's official news agency was hacked last week and fake remarks critical of US foreign policy were posted on its website, wrongly attributed to Qatar's leader.

    Now, a series of emails belonging to the ambassador of the United Arab Emirates to the US have been leaked.

    They reveal close coordination between the diplomat and a pro-Israeli think-tank in Washington DC.

    The emails also show how ambassador Yousef al-Otaiba and the Foundation for Defense of Democracies (FDD) lobbied in the US against Qatar and Kuwait.

    How will this impact US policy in the Gulf?

    Presenter: Hashem Ahelbarra

    Guests:

    Saad Djebbar - international lawyer

    Ian Black - visiting senior fellow at the Middle East Centre at London School of Economics and a former Middle East editor for The Guardian newspaper

    Mohammed Cherkaoui - professor of Conflict Resolution at George Mason University

    Source: Al Jazeera News
    http://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/...190713001.html

    ----------




    (CNSNews.com) – Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates all severed diplomatic ties with Qatar in a concerted move on Monday, accusing of it supporting Shi’ite and Sunni extremists causing chaos and sectarianism across the region.

    Saudi Arabia accused Qatar of supporting ISIS and al-Qaeda terrorists and the Muslim Brotherhood, backing Shi’ite Houthi militia in Yemen, and financing anti-government terrorism in Bahrain.

    In a statement released through the official SPA news agency, the kingdom also accused Qatari authorities of sowing divisions in Saudi Arabia in a bid to incite anti-state resistance and undermine its sovereignty.

    Bahrain meanwhile accused Qatar of “financing armed groups associated with Iran to carry out subversive attacks and spread chaos” in Bahrain, among other things.

    Saudi Arabia and Bahrain said they were closing their airspace, ports and territorial waters to traffic from Qatar, and would not allow their citizens to visit Qatar or Qataris to visit their countries. They also directed their criticism at Qatari media outlets

    Qatar was also expelled from the Saudi-led military coalition battling against the Iranian-backed Houthi militia in support of ousted President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi.

    The deepening diplomatic row could prove awkward for the United States, which has close ties with all the countries involved – and has the forward headquarters of U.S. Central Command located at Qatar’s Al Udeid Air Base.

    President Trump met with Qatari emir Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani on the sidelines of last month’s U.S.-Arab-Islamic summit hosted by the Saudis in Riyadh.

    The previous month, Defense Secretary James Mattis visited Doha to discuss “deepening the U.S.-Qatari strategic partnership” and the campaign to defeat ISIS, the Pentagon reported at the time.

    Iran and its regional destabilization was a major theme at the summit attended by Trump in Riyadh.

    Long-simmering tensions between Qatar and its neighbors came to the boil shortly after the high-level gathering, when Qatari media quoted the emir, al-Thani, as giving a speech in which he voiced support for Iran, and criticized the Saudi-led effort to isolate Tehran.

    Qatar then denied the veracity of the report, alleging that its official news agency had been targeted by hackers.

    In Monday’s fast-moving developments, the United Arab Emirates issued a statement through its official WAM news agency saying it was taking the same steps as Saudi Arabia and Bahrain, in support of its two “sisterly” allies.

    It cited in particular “Qatar’s continued support, funding and hosting of terror groups,” citing the Muslim Brotherhood, ISIS and al-Qaeda.

    The Emirati news agency also accused Qatar of violating a statement issued at the May 21 U.S.-Arab-Islamic summit “on countering terrorism in the region and considering Iran a state sponsor of terrorism.”

    Egypt’s foreign ministry said it was taking the same steps against Qatar as the Gulf states, “to protect its national security.”

    “Qatar’s policy threatens Arab national security and sows the seeds of strife and division within Arab societies according to a deliberate plan aimed at the unity and interests of the Arab nation,” it said.


    Egypt’s statement also accused Qatar of supporting terrorist organizations, naming the Muslim Brotherhood in particular.

    In mid-2013 the Egyptian military, then led by the Gen. Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, ousted the elected Muslim Brotherhood government of President Mohammed Morsi. Sisi, now president, then outlawed the organization.

    Qatar’s support for the Muslim Brotherhood has caused problems in the past with its Arab Gulf neighbors, which view the Muslim Brotherhood as a security threat to their regimes. In 2014, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and the UAE temporarily withdrew their ambassadors from Qatar in a dispute over the Brotherhood.

    In a speech that year, a senior U.S. Treasury Department official voiced concern about Qatar’s stance on extremist groups fighting in Syria, as well as the Palestinian terrorist group Hamas.

    The department’s then undersecretary for terrorism and financial intelligence, David Cohen, said fundraisers in Qatar were collecting donations for extremists in Syria, including ISIS and the al-Qaeda-affiliated Jabhat al-Nusra, a situation which he said “threatens to aggravate an already volatile situation.”

    Cohen also said that Qatar “has for many years openly financed Hamas, a group that continues to undermine regional stability.”


    https://www.cnsnews.com/news/article...ing-terrorists


    ---------------


    Now the truth emerges: how the US fuelled the rise of Isis in Syria and Iraq

    Seumas Milne
    The sectarian terror group won’t be defeated by the western states that incubated it in the first place

    Contact author
    Wednesday 3 June 2015 15.56 EDT Last modified on Friday 7 April 2017 19.05 EDT

    The war on terror, that campaign without end launched 14 years ago by George Bush, is tying itself up in ever more grotesque contortions. On Monday the trial in London of a Swedish man, Bherlin Gildo, accused of terrorism in Syria, collapsed after it became clear British intelligence had been arming the same rebel groups the defendant was charged with supporting.

    The prosecution abandoned the case, apparently to avoid embarrassing the intelligence services. The defence argued that going ahead with the trial would have been an “affront to justice” when there was plenty of evidence the British state was itself providing “extensive support” to the armed Syrian opposition.

    Terrorism has come about in assimilationist France and also in multicultural Britain. Why is that? | Kenan Malik
    Read more
    That didn’t only include the “non-lethal assistance” boasted of by the government (including body armour and military vehicles), but training, logistical support and the secret supply of “arms on a massive scale”. Reports were cited that MI6 had cooperated with the CIA on a “rat line” of arms transfers from Libyan stockpiles to the Syrian rebels in 2012 after the fall of the Gaddafi regime.

    Clearly, the absurdity of sending someone to prison for doing what ministers and their security officials were up to themselves became too much. But it’s only the latest of a string of such cases. Less fortunate was a London cab driver Anis Sardar, who was given a life sentence a fortnight earlier for taking part in 2007 in resistance to the occupation of Iraq by US and British forces. Armed opposition to illegal invasion and occupation clearly doesn’t constitute terrorism or murder on most definitions, including the Geneva convention.

    But terrorism is now squarely in the eye of the beholder. And nowhere is that more so than in the Middle East, where today’s terrorists are tomorrow’s fighters against tyranny – and allies are enemies – often at the bewildering whim of a western policymaker’s conference call.

    For the past year, US, British and other western forces have been back in Iraq, supposedly in the cause of destroying the hyper-sectarian terror group Islamic State (formerly known as al-Qaida in Iraq). This was after Isis overran huge chunks of Iraqi and Syrian territory and proclaimed a self-styled Islamic caliphate.

    The campaign isn’t going well. Last month, Isis rolled into the Iraqi city of Ramadi, while on the other side of the now nonexistent border its forces conquered the Syrian town of Palmyra. Al-Qaida’s official franchise, the Nusra Front, has also been making gains in Syria.

    Some Iraqis complain that the US sat on its hands while all this was going on. The Americans insist they are trying to avoid civilian casualties, and claim significant successes. Privately, officials say they don’t want to be seen hammering Sunni strongholds in a sectarian war and risk upsetting their Sunni allies in the Gulf.




    Now the truth emerges: how the US fuelled the rise of Isis in Syria and Iraq

    Seumas Milne
    The sectarian terror group won’t be defeated by the western states that incubated it in the first place

    Contact author
    Wednesday 3 June 2015 15.56 EDT Last modified on Friday 7 April 2017 19.05 EDT

    The war on terror, that campaign without end launched 14 years ago by George Bush, is tying itself up in ever more grotesque contortions. On Monday the trial in London of a Swedish man, Bherlin Gildo, accused of terrorism in Syria, collapsed after it became clear British intelligence had been arming the same rebel groups the defendant was charged with supporting.

    The prosecution abandoned the case, apparently to avoid embarrassing the intelligence services. The defence argued that going ahead with the trial would have been an “affront to justice” when there was plenty of evidence the British state was itself providing “extensive support” to the armed Syrian opposition.


    That didn’t only include the “non-lethal assistance” boasted of by the government (including body armour and military vehicles), but training, logistical support and the secret supply of “arms on a massive scale”. Reports were cited that MI6 had cooperated with the CIA on a “rat line” of arms transfers from Libyan stockpiles to the Syrian rebels in 2012 after the fall of the Gaddafi regime.

    Clearly, the absurdity of sending someone to prison for doing what ministers and their security officials were up to themselves became too much. But it’s only the latest of a string of such cases. Less fortunate was a London cab driver Anis Sardar, who was given a life sentence a fortnight earlier for taking part in 2007 in resistance to the occupation of Iraq by US and British forces. Armed opposition to illegal invasion and occupation clearly doesn’t constitute terrorism or murder on most definitions, including the Geneva convention.

    But terrorism is now squarely in the eye of the beholder. And nowhere is that more so than in the Middle East, where today’s terrorists are tomorrow’s fighters against tyranny – and allies are enemies – often at the bewildering whim of a western policymaker’s conference call.

    For the past year, US, British and other western forces have been back in Iraq, supposedly in the cause of destroying the hyper-sectarian terror group Islamic State (formerly known as al-Qaida in Iraq). This was after Isis overran huge chunks of Iraqi and Syrian territory and proclaimed a self-styled Islamic caliphate.

    The campaign isn’t going well. Last month, Isis rolled into the Iraqi city of Ramadi, while on the other side of the now nonexistent border its forces conquered the Syrian town of Palmyra. Al-Qaida’s official franchise, the Nusra Front, has also been making gains in Syria.

    Some Iraqis complain that the US sat on its hands while all this was going on. The Americans insist they are trying to avoid civilian casualties, and claim significant successes. Privately, officials say they don’t want to be seen hammering Sunni strongholds in a sectarian war and risk upsetting their Sunni allies in the Gulf.

    https://www.theguardian.com/commenti...sis-syria-iraq
















    كَمَثَلِ الَّذِينَ مِن قَبْلِهِمْ قَرِيبًا ذَاقُوا وَبَالَ أَمْرِهِمْ وَلَهُمْ عَذَابٌ أَلِيمٌ {15
    059:015
    :
    They are like their immediate predecessors, they tasted the evil result of their conduct, and (in the Hereafter, there is) for them a painful torment;-

    كَمَثَلِ الشَّيْطَانِ إِذْ قَالَ لِلْإِنسَانِ اكْفُرْ فَلَمَّا كَفَرَ قَالَ إِنِّي بَرِيءٌ مِّنكَ إِنِّي أَخَافُ اللَّهَ رَبَّ الْعَالَمِينَ {16
    059:016
    :
    (Their allies deceived them) like Shaitan (Satan), when he says to man: "reject and be ungrateful to Allah." But when (man) rejects Allah, Shaitan (Satan) says: "I am free of you, I fear Allah, the Lord of the 'Alamin (mankind, jinns and all that exists)!------------------------
    Last edited by Abz2000; 06-06-2017 at 05:24 PM.
    cutting diplomatic ties with Qatar













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    Re: cutting diplomatic ties with Qatar

    Quote Originally Posted by Mustafa16 View Post
    Believe I've heard all of your arguments, ...
    ..and we've been witness to your drivel.

    Scimi
    cutting diplomatic ties with Qatar


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    Re: cutting diplomatic ties with Qatar

    Quote Originally Posted by Mustafa16 View Post
    Ignore me then. I've been ignoring you anyway. You always come up with what, in my opinion, are ludicrous conspiracy theories that blame everything on the West. I'd rather trust the West and the UN with my life then I would an Islamist with my laundry. And many displaced, tortured, persecuted, abused, and humiliated, starved, and besieged people around the world would agree with me.

    It is absolutely clear and beyond doubt that the godless American government are a criminal gang that feed off ignorance, suffering, bloodshed and evil.
    The fact that they have been striving frantically to ensure that instability, war, bloodshed, suffering and depravity are always present globally - regardless of friend or foe - is undisputable.
    I hope and expect that the Arab leaders have woken up to this fact and that Allah helps them in uniting and establishing His rule.


    The rich oil deposits in the region were exploited and controlled by seven oil companies from England, France, and the United States until Iran's Mossadegh government nationalized their oil in 1951, taking it from the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company (now British Petroleum).
    Western nations imposed sanctions on Iran until 1953, when the CIA helped overthrow Mossadegh. Then General Norman Schwarzkopf Sr. helped Shah Reza Pahlevi set up the oppressive SAVAK state police.
    The Hashemite monarchy in Iraq was overthrown in 1958 by a nationalist revolution led by Abdel Karim Kassem,
    Two years later (1960) the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) was founded to counter the western oil monopolies.
    In 1963 a CIA-backed coup killed Kassem and thousands of his supporters.
    Five years later (1968) the secular Ba'ath Party gained power in Iraq.....
    ..... and they nationalized Iraq's oil in 1972.
    In 1972 the US had declared Iraq a nation that supports terrorism.
    In May of that year President Nixon, Henry Kissinger, and the Shah of Iran began instigating the Kurds in northern Iraq to rebel by giving them weapons.
    When Iraq agreed to share the disputed Shatt-al-Arab waterway with Iran in 1975, the Shah stopped supporting the Kurds.
    The Shah was overthrown by the Iranian revolution in February 1979.
    Saddam Hussein replaced al-Bakr as president of Iraq in June 1979

    US Intelligence Helps Saddam's Party Seize Power in 1963

    Saddam Key in Early CIA Plot (April 10, 2003)
    According to former US intelligence officials and diplomats, the CIA's relationship with Saddam Hussein dates back to 1959, when he was part of a CIA-authorized six-man squad that attempted to assassinate Iraqi Prime Minister Abd al-Karim Qasim. (United Press International)
    After the Americans in the Tehran embassy were taken hostage by the Iranian radicals in November 1979, US National Security Advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski began urging Iraq to attack Iran to take back the waterway.
    In 1980 the U.S. broke off diplomatic relations with Iran because of the Tehran embassy hostage crisis;
    In 1980 Iraq's Saddam Hussein, guided by US intelligence, went to war against Iran, a war that would last eight years and kill about a million people.
    Weaker Iraq was supported in this war effort at first by the Soviet empire, Arab states including Kuwait and Saudi Arabia, and then by the western powers Britain, France, West Germany, and the United States, which provided satellite and AWACS intelligence. Egypt, which was receiving $2 billion per year in US aid, sent Iraq troops, tanks, and heavy artillery. Another US aid recipient, Turkey, helped Iraq by fighting its Kurdish rebels. Saudi Arabia provided money, and Kuwait alone loaned Iraq $30 billion.
    The US sold arms worth $20 billion to Gulf states, and the Reagan administration illegally allowed Saudi Arabia to transfer weapons to Iraq.
    In 1972 the US had declared Iraq a nation that supports terrorism, but the Reagan regime took Iraq off that list.
    How the White House illegally armed Iraq is explained in detail by investigative reporter Alan Friedman in Spider's Web.
    In December 1983 President Reagan sent special envoy Donald Rumsfeld to Baghdad to restore diplomatic relations with Saddam Hussein's government and to offer US loan guarantees to Iraq. The next spring the Export-Import Bank sent Iraq $500 million. The US also became Iraq's major trading partner by increasing its purchases of Iraqi oil. Vice President Bush, the State Department, and the CIA urged the Export-Import Bank to finance US exports to Iraq. The Atlanta branch of the Italian Banca Nazionale del Lavoro arranged for $5.5 billion in fraudulent loans that were guaranteed by the Commodity Credit Corporation. In 1986 a CIA team was sent to Baghdad as military advisors.
    Meanwhile Oliver North had been secretly shipping arms to Iran until this illegal trade was exposed in late 1986.(iran contra).
    The next year the US helped Iraq by protecting Kuwaiti oil tankers. In the late 1980s CIA fronts in Saudi Arabia and Chile sent 73 weapons transactions to Baghdad that included weapons-grade anthrax and equipment to repair rockets.

    The Iraq-Iran War ended with a cease-fire on August 7, 1988,
    and the next day Kuwait drastically increased its oil production, breaking OPEC agreements and driving the price from $21 a barrel down to $11. this would cost Iraq $14 billion a year.

    Only after the Iraq-Iran War ended did the US complain that Saddam Hussein had used chemical weapons on the Kurds six months before. Yet the US had helped supply such weapons that also had been used against Iran. The US Senate voted to cancel technology and food sales to Iraq.

    1989 CENTCOM's war plan 1002 was revised to make Iraq the enemy instead of the Soviet Union.

    During an Arab summit meeting at Amman in February 1990 Saddam Hussein asked the US to withdraw from the Gulf and alerted others that the US wanted to dominate the Gulf region and fix oil prices

    In April 1990 Saddam Hussein proposed that the Middle East become a nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons-free zone.
    In May, Saddam Hussein complained of economic warfare, and on July 17 he publicly accused Kuwait and the US of conspiring to destroy Iraq's economy. He warned them, and the next day Iraqi troops moved to the Kuwaiti border.

    On August 2, 1990 Iraq invaded Kuwait.
    President Bush immediately prohibited US trade with Iraq and froze $30 billion in Iraqi assets, making Iraq unable to pay its UN dues.
    The US insisted that Iraq's vote be taken away even though the US owed the UN $1.6 billion in unpaid dues at the time.
    The same day a US battle group of seven warships was dispatched, and the next day the United Nations Security Council condemned Iraq. Saddam Hussein told Jordan's King Hussein that he would withdraw if the Arab League did not condemn Iraq. King Hussein tried to persuade Egypt's Hosni Mubarak; but Egypt was pressured by the US and introduced the condemnation resolution. So instead of withdrawing, Saddam Hussein claimed that Kuwait was part of Iraq.

    On August 6 the UN Security Council imposed international sanctions on Iraq, and the next day the US persuaded King Fahd to let the US military use territory in Saudi Arabia. The US claimed that Iraqi troops were near the Saudi border, but satellite photos later refuted this. On August 8 President Bush ordered 40,000 troops to defend Saudi Arabia.


    Saddam Hussein offered to debate President Bush and Prime Minister Thatcher on television to no avail.
    In September embargoed Iraq began rationing food supplies.

    In the United States the media began demonizing Saddam Hussein, and Secretary of State James Baker even argued that the war was necessary to provide jobs for the sagging economy.
    When a poll showed that Americans would support an invasion to prevent Iraq from getting nuclear weapons, that argument was used even though the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) estimated that Iraq was at least three years away from having even one atomic bomb.
    A girl, who turned out to be the daughter of the Kuwaiti ambassador, testified before a Congressional committee that Iraqi soldiers had taken babies from incubators, but this was later exposed as a hoax devised by the public relations firm Hill & Knowlton.

    The United States used bribery and threats to get the United Nations Security Council to give it authorization for the war. Ethiopia, Zaire, and Colombia got new aid. China got a loan from the World Bank and better diplomatic relations. After its vote, the Soviet Union was loaned $4 billion by Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and the UAE. Egypt altogether had $14 billion of debt canceled. Cuba and Yemen were punished for not voting in favor. The UN allowed the US and its allies to act without any limitation, and the US never even reported what it did. Essentially the UN had relinquished its authority to the US.

    On January 16 Bush ordered General Schwarzkopf to begin the attack. Iraq was immediately hit with thousands of missiles and bombs that destroyed 85% of its power and vital services within two days. This attack on the civilian infrastructure that destroyed Iraq's energy, sewage, and water systems has been considered a form of biological warfare because of the diseases caused. This was probably the most one-sided war in history, and it is more accurate to call it a massacre or genocide.

    On February 13 a US bomb killed 1,500 civilians in a Baghdad bomb shelter, and two days later President Bush urged the Iraqi people to overthrow Saddam Hussein.
    On February 21 Soviet diplomats announced that Iraq had agreed to withdraw unconditionally from Kuwait. The US gave them two days to do so before starting the ground attack. On February 26 as Iraqi troops tried to retreat or surrender along the Basra road, thousands were slaughtered during the "turkey shoot" on the "highway of death."
    Two days later Iraq and the US agreed on a cease-fire; but two days after that, thousands of Iraqi soldiers were killed in another battle that did not kill a single American.

    Ramsey Clark estimated that the bombing killed at least 25,000 Iraqi civilians directly and another 25,000 indirectly. American bombing hit 28 hospitals, 52 community clinics, and 676 schools, completely destroying 38 schools. Civilian vehicles on highways were strafed. The Pentagon admitted that civilian targets were attacked to demoralize the people and make the sanctions more effective.


    The rest can be found here:
    what were the iraq wars about?
    Last edited by Abz2000; 06-06-2017 at 09:57 PM.
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    Mustafa16's Avatar
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    Re: cutting diplomatic ties with Qatar

    Quote Originally Posted by Scimitar View Post
    ..and we've been witness to your drivel.

    Scimi
    I've been clinically depressed for months, even over a year now. I've been on again and off again hopeless, in despair, wanting to hurt myself, hurting myself, and wanting to either kill myself or give up on life. You've delivered the final blow. I'm giving up on life. I have no purpose in living. No hope....no hope.....I expect the mods will place this post under review because they are like the Turkish and/or North Korean Media. Very censoring. But I'll see after I click post.
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    Ahmed.'s Avatar
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    Re: cutting diplomatic ties with Qatar

    Quote Originally Posted by Mustafa16 View Post
    I've been clinically depressed for months, even over a year now. I've been on again and off again hopeless, in despair, wanting to hurt myself, hurting myself, and wanting to either kill myself or give up on life. You've delivered the final blow. I'm giving up on life. I have no purpose in living. No hope....no hope.....I expect the mods will place this post under review because they are like the Turkish and/or North Korean Media. Very censoring. But I'll see after I click post.
    what!!!

    this is serious mental illness man!!!

    did you see a doc?
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    Re: cutting diplomatic ties with Qatar

    Quote Originally Posted by Mustafa16 View Post
    I've been clinically depressed for months, even over a year now. I've been on again and off again hopeless, in despair, wanting to hurt myself, hurting myself, and wanting to either kill myself or give up on life. You've delivered the final blow. I'm giving up on life. I have no purpose in living. No hope....no hope.....I expect the mods will place this post under review because they are like the Turkish and/or North Korean Media. Very censoring. But I'll see after I click post.
    Bro, why are you stressing over "naitonal" affairs? do you not know that you are only a young pup? 17 years old and hardly able to see any truth at this age and only a world full of lies - even us adults remain wary of the nonsense the media and politicians spew on TV. We prefer to disengage from their lying narratives and instead - focus on our Islam - because politics aint getting you into heaven - Islam is!

    All I have seen you do in recent months is make flippant topics on Gulenism, Turkey, and the politics - and between these - you have basically neglected your Islam - this is why I wrote "...and we've been witness to your drivel".

    I like you, you know I do. I've defended you in the past against members who have thrown mud at you online, have I not? I was hoping that my harsh words would have some sort of impact, and they have - albeit - quite an over exaggerated one.

    As an elder brother figure, unlce figure even due to my age - my advice to you is simple Mustafa - disconnect from any conversation about these three things:

    1) Gulenism
    2) Turkey
    3) Politics

    These three topics have become trials in your young and innocent life - and believe me - I treasure your innocence. I do not want to see your innocence lost over this nonsense. Instead I'd like for your innocence to remain pure and molded into something bigger than itself - something better than itself - what is that? you may ask. I've seen young brothers in your position learn Islam, and study it further and with their innocence - derive truthful understandings from Qur'an and Sunnah because they were untainted and had no evil in them - you too are like this. But your innocence and naivete is being played with by those 3 evils in your society. I know how difficult it is to be a young Turk. I have Turkish friends who have lost their innocence and drink alcohol and gamble and do worse - you are nothing like them - yet - because you haven't totally given up hope.

    Hope.

    This is what you should do my bro - totally, absolutely, forget the modern world and study history from Islam. Because the answers you seek deep down are coded into Islamic history.

    Start with Stories of the Prophet's by Ibn Katheer - and when you are done reading from the Chapter of Adam Alalihis Salaam to the Chapter of Ibraheem Alaihis Salaam - let me know and I will add you to my whatsapp - then you learn frome me.

    I do not usually offer this help to forum members bro, but you I consider as my little brother/nephew type - and I will not see you suffer this anymore.

    At your wits end, the help has come. When one hits the rock bottom of the pit, and can go no lower in his own estimation - guess what? there is only one way left to go - you will rise again and when you do - it will be something you can live with happily because Islam brings "peace" to the heart. Not anguish and sorrow my bro. I will stay with you through this process in sh'Allah, and when you are fortified with deen and the understanding of the "self" - you will be able to help others too. I know you have it in you, the heart you have is a caring one, and caring hearts need to be guided so they do not care about the wrong things.

    In sh'Allah, it's all about to change for the better.

    Remember - no more Gulenism, politics or Turkey talk. Qisas al Anbiyah by Ibn Katheer (Stories of the Prophets by Ibn Katheer) once you are up to chapter Ibraheem and finished it - I will give you some deep understandings into the societal ills plaguing mankind today and you will see that these are just repetitive of previous peoples and nothing new. Knowing this is not enough - what i want to give you are the mechanics employed to make these evils fruit - so your sense will spot them before they ever take a hold of your soul and shake it like before - in sh'Allah

    May Allah preserve you!

    Scimi

    Quote Originally Posted by Bhai View Post
    what!!!

    this is serious mental illness man!!!

    did you see a doc?
    No need for that bhaisaab - i too have suffered the same, and today I help others who suffer Allahu Alam.
    Last edited by Scimitar; 06-06-2017 at 11:01 PM.
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    Mustafa16's Avatar
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    Re: cutting diplomatic ties with Qatar

    Quote Originally Posted by Bhai View Post
    what!!!

    this is serious mental illness man!!!

    did you see a doc?
    I do see a doctor and a therapist for it. Not much help, but I'd be alot worse if I didn't see them.
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    Re: cutting diplomatic ties with Qatar

    Will you do as I ask Mustafa?
    cutting diplomatic ties with Qatar


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    Re: cutting diplomatic ties with Qatar

    ScimitarYou bring it on the point. That's what I observed the last months either. And that's the reason why I recommended the brother Mustafa to read the Islamic Creed Series by Dr. Al-Ashqar. Maybe it's little too much for the beginnging (8 books). Perhaps you stick to the advice of the brother and read the stories of the prophets. Don't burden yourself too much.

    I do see a doctor and a therapist for it. Not much help, but I'd be alot worse if I didn't see them.


    Don't give up akhi. Life is nothing more than a struggle. Take the offered help from the brother Scimi! Calm dowm and don't burden world affairs on your shoulders. We little man can not change what's going on there. Focus on your own life!

    wasalama

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    Re: cutting diplomatic ties with Qatar

    Quote Originally Posted by Scimitar View Post
    Will you do as I ask Mustafa?
    If you mean cease being Gulenist and hanging out with Gulenists and doing Gulenist Sufi practices and believing in the Gulenist ideals of peace, justice, human rights, democracy, rule of law, cooperation, non violence, dialogue, peacebuilding, education, etc.
    then no.......if you mean stop obsessing over politics, and learning more about the Deen from both Gulenist and non-Gulenist mainstream sources, yes. i already watch islamic videos and i learned my lesson about trolling turks after getting temporarily banned from quora.


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