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Saudi Arabia’s new Crown Prince

اَللَّهُ أَكْبَرُ اللَّهُ أَكْبَرُ اللَّهُ أَكْبَرُ - لَا إلَهَ إلَّا اللَّهُ وَاَللَّهُ أَكْبَرُ اَللَّهُ أَكْبَرُ وَلِلَّهِ الْحَمْد - اَللَّهُ أَكْبَرُ اللَّهُ أَكْبَرُ اللَّهُ أَكْبَرُ - لَا إلَهَ إلَّا اللَّهُ وَاَللَّهُ أَكْبَرُ اَللَّهُ أَكْبَرُ وَلِلَّهِ الْحَمْد - اَللَّهُ أَكْبَرُ اللَّهُ أَكْبَرُ اللَّهُ أَكْبَرُ - لَا إلَهَ إلَّا اللَّهُ وَاَللَّهُ أَكْبَرُ اَللَّهُ أَكْبَرُ وَلِلَّهِ الْحَمْد - اللَّهُ أَكْبَرُ كَبِيرًا وَالْحَمْدُ لِلَّهِ كَثِيرًا وَسُبْحَانَ اللَّهِ بُكْرَةً وَأَصِيلًا
Four things to do during the blessed 10 days of Dhul-Hijjah
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  1. #1
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    Saudi Arabia’s new Crown Prince (OP)


    Salaam

    Lets look at whats happening in Saudi Arabia.

    BAKU - King Salman of Saudi Arabia named his favourite son Mohammed bin Salman as next in line for the throne on June 21st. In addition to promotion, the King removed all titles from the former crown prince Mohammed bin Nayef.

    The reorganisation is nothing less than groundbreaking. Typically, Saudi Arabia has been ruled by kings in the 70s or 80s. But, in his 30s, bin Salman will become the youngest ruler in the history of the kingdom and thereby preside over the political, economic and social reforms in the country.



    1 | Likes rozyred liked this post

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    Re: Saudi Arabia’s new Crown Prince

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    Salaam

    This is relevant.

    Blurb

    Saudi King Abdullah confronts the Libyan Leader Muammar Gaddafi.




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    Re: Saudi Arabia’s new Crown Prince

    Salaam

    Another update

    Guest Writer: The challenge of rebranding Saudi Arabia


    Though the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) is a comparatively recent construct, it bases much of its claim to legitimacy on being the “homeland” of Islam. Saudi monarchs have particularly treasured their title of Custodian of the Two Mosques (Makkah and Madinah). Even if the personal behaviour of some members of the enormous Saudi royal family falls far short of the basic tenets of Islamic teaching, the King oversees a country that puts religion at its heart. Moreover, the Kingdom has refined its own distinctive brand of Sunni Islam; Wahhabism is fundamentalist in the true sense of the word, in that adherents seek guidance for life today in their understanding of the text of the Qur’an and the ahadith, while rejecting many aspects of modernity and denouncing alternative interpretations.

    Some years ago, when I visited the headquarters of Saudi Aramco in the Eastern Province (an area with a high concentration of Shia Muslims, incidentally), the manager showing me round declared proudly that God had given the Kingdom oil as a reward for following the true path of Islam. He clearly really believed that to be true. What is more, Saudi Arabia has used a significant proportion of the wealth generated by that oil to export Wahhabism to other parts of the world, such as Pakistan. Whereas other oil-rich Gulf States like Kuwait have channelled some of their riches to poorer countries in the form of development assistance, the Saudis have tended to fund mosques and madrassas instead. Meanwhile, millions of migrant workers, not least from Egypt, have returned home after spells working in the Kingdom influenced strongly by the religious environment that they experienced there.

    However, religion is not the only tool that Saudi Arabia has used to assert its desire for hegemony over the Middle East and beyond. Encouraged by the United States and Britain, among others, the KSA has acquired military hardware on a scale way beyond what is required for its own defence. Nonetheless, Riyadh argues that this is necessary because of the “threat” from Iran. Tension between the two countries is only tangentially based on theological differences between Sunni and Shia Islam. The main Saudi objection to the Iranian Islamic Revolution of 1979 was that it toppled the institution of monarchy, and monarchy is one of the twin pillars of Saudi society alongside Wahhabi Islam. All of the Arab Gulf States have royal rulers and when the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) considered inviting Jordan and Morocco to join a few years back, it became glaringly obvious that the institution is a kind of monarchy preservation society.

    With justification one can ask whether a system based on royalty and religion is fit for purpose in our postmodern age. Certainly, many of the thousands of young Saudis who were sent to universities in Britain or the United States to study have been wondering about that. Disquiet among Saudi youth, both at home and abroad, has been a major stimulus for the royal family’s acceptance that if the system is going to survive, then there has to be a degree of reform. Prince Mohammad Bin Salman, catapulted to the pole position of Crown Prince by his father, King Salman, is the personification of that. Of course, some of the measures promoted since he became the heir to the Saudi throne and the main political driving force in the country have been pretty tame by global standards. Opening a few cinemas and allowing women to drive from this summer may have dragged the Kingdom into the 20th century, but it is still a long way from being at home in the 21st. Nevertheless, with the aid of expensive Western PR agencies, the Kingdom is disseminating a narrative of progressive change.

    Therein lies a certain danger, as there is a contradiction between progressive change and the conservative doctrine of Wahhabism. When the KSA opens its doors to Western tourists – as is being seriously considered – how will the religious authorities react? The hostility towards the stationing of American troops in the Kingdom during the 1990-1991 Gulf War and its aftermath was such that they eventually had to leave for more hospitable bases in Bahrain and Qatar, which is hardly an encouraging precedent. Many Saudis enjoy their holidays in the more liberal surroundings of London, Casablanca or Beirut, but that does not mean that they would necessarily be happy to see the KSA become more like the rest of the largely secular world. It is not just the imams who see religion plus monarchy as the country’s USP.

    Meanwhile, Bin Salman is flexing the Kingdom’s muscle on the world stage in ways that do not always sit well with the country’s religious vocation. One consequence of the rivalry with Iran is that Riyadh has looked for allies in confronting Tehran. In keeping with the old adage that my enemy’s enemy is my friend, this has meant increasing – though still largely covert – communication with Israel. As a key partner for both Israel and Saudi Arabia, the United States is delighted about this development, and now that Mike Pompeo and John Bolton have assumed top jobs in the Trump administration we can expect more coordinated, heightened rhetoric against Iran from those three states.

    Back in 2011, during the so-called Arab Spring, the Saudis (and Emiratis) intervened in Bahrain to help crush the predominantly Shia demonstrations in and around Manama’s Pearl Roundabout, accusing Iran of using the demonstrators in an attempt to overthrow the Bahraini monarchy. Less well publicised has been the Saudi government’s suppression of Shia protestors in the Kingdom’s Eastern Province. However, it would be wrong to see the unrest there purely in religious terms, as a Sunni-Shia confrontation, because the root causes are to be found more in unequal access to jobs and opportunities, as well as higher levels of poverty within the Shia community.

    Similarly, much of the Western media likes to portray the conflict in Yemen as a proxy war between Sunni Saudi Arabia and Shia Iran, though the reality on the ground is much more complicated than that. Mohammad Bin Salman doubtless hoped that strong intervention in Yemen in 2015 would lead to a quick victory that would boost his own standing as well as his country’s, but as the Americans found in Iraq and the Russians in Afghanistan, it is rare for such interventions to have swift, positive outcomes and all too easy for the situation to descend into chaos. Far from enhancing the reputation of the Crown Prince and Riyadh, the Yemen war is turning into a millstone round his neck.

    More successful, so far, has been his crackdown on corruption within Saudi Arabia itself. One has to admire the chutzpah of imprisoning billionaires in the Ritz Carlton Hotel in Riyadh while confiscating some of their wealth. Tackling corruption should in theory ingratiate Bin Salman to the religious authorities, but it is risky, as it strikes at the very heart of the Saudi system. “Commission”, as bribes are euphemistically called, is built into almost every business deal – as foreign companies know to their cost – and wasta, or the clout wielded by one’s personal network of contacts, is still an essential element of getting anything done in Saudi Arabia. Both religious morality and international norms ought to endorse the abolition of both, but in confronting them the heir apparent may be playing with fire. Tradition is at the core of Saudi culture, in many ways as important as Islam itself.
    #MBS

    Inevitably, one needs to ask the question whether Mohammad Bin Salman will be able to rebrand the Kingdom’s image, as he seems to wish to do, to turn the country into a modern, outward-facing, progressive nation, despite the fact that currently its society is based so solidly on tradition and religion. Or will the reforms he is ushering in, presumably with his father’s approval, merely be window-dressing, like the cinemas?

    Western powers, led by the Trump administration and Britain’s Conservative government, are cheering him on, but that is no guarantee of success. When a toy drone flew near a palace in Riyadh recently it triggered a major security alert. This was not just paranoia within the hugely powerful royal family; it reflected the fact that, as in Iran in 1979, there are groups in Saudi Arabia today who would be only too happy to raise the banner of their brand of Islam and overthrow the monarchy and all that goes with it.

    https://www.middleeastmonitor.com/20180509-the-challenge-of-rebranding-saudi-arabia/

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    Re: Saudi Arabia’s new Crown Prince

    http://observer.com/2018/05/is-saudi...n-prince-dead/


    Is Saudi Arabia’s 32-Year-Old Crown Prince Dead?
    By Sissi Cao • 05/25/18 4:37pm



    Mohammed bin Salman hasn’t appeared in the public eye for over a month. Mark Wilson/Getty Images


    Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman, the 32-year-old media-savvy leader of the oil kingdom, has been unnaturally quiet recently, so much so that some in the Middle East media couldn’t help but wonder if he is dead.


    Bin Salman hasn’t been seen in the public eye since his meeting with the Spanish royal family in on April 12. On April 21, heavy gunfire was heard near a royal palace in Riyadh, the kingdom’s capital. Although Saudi Arabia’s state news agency claimed it was a security force shooting down a toy drone that had gotten too close to the royal property, some wondered if the gunfire was in fact a coup led by Saudi royals trying to topple King Salman.


    Some of Saudi Arabia’s enemies were pretty sure.


    Last week, the Iranian newspaper Kayhan reported that the Crown Prince was hit by two bullets during the attack and may actually be dead, citing “a secret service report sent to the senior officials of an unnamed Arab state.”




    “There is plenty of evidence to suggest that the absence of nearly 30 days of Muhammad bin Salman, the Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia, is due to an incident which is being hidden from the public,” the daily paper claimed.


    To add credence to the speculation, Kayhan pointed out that Bin Salman was not seen on camera when the new U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo visited Riyadh in late April, while his father, Saudi King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud, and Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir were photographed.


    Iran and Saudi Arabia are longtime rivals in the Middle East competing for more dominant influence in the region.


    To dismiss the rumor, the Saudi royal family on Wednesday released a photo of Bin Salman at a cabinet meeting in Jeddah and confirmed that he is alive.


    View image on TwitterView image on Twitter


    Ahmed Al Omran
    ✔ @Ahmed
    Saudi crown prince during the cabinet meeting in Jeddah tonight —SPA


    2:12 PM - May 22, 2018
    47
    27 people are talking about this


    Bin Salman’s month-long disappearance from the media limelight contrasts his high-profile tour in the U.S. and Europe just weeks prior, during which he courted a number of American business titans to discuss business deals.


    Back home, the heir to the Saudi throne faces dangerous tension within the royal family. According to Iran’s PressTV, Bin Salman’s cousin, Bin Nayef, and Mutab Bin Abdullah, son of a late king, are both against his aggressive invasion into Yemen and blockade of Qatar.




    The coup on April 21, if true, was most likely a move of retaliation against Bin Salman’s sweeping anti-corruption crackdown in November 2017, in which he detained dozens of wealthy royal members.

    - - - Updated - - -

  6. #64
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    Re: Saudi Arabia’s new Crown Prince

    Salaam

    Credible? Not sure but intriguing.

    Dissident prince urges uncles to seize power in Saudi Arabia: MEE

    Prince Khaled: I have received a large number of emails from within the police and army in support of my call


    A dissident Saudi prince has called on his uncles to depose King Salman and take over the country.

    Prince Khaled bin Farhan made the appeal to Prince Ahmed bin Abdulaziz and Prince Muqrin bin Abdulaziz, saying that the damage being done to the Saudi royal family and the kingdom by Salman’s “irrational, erratic and stupid” rule had gone beyond the point of no-return.

    In an interview with Middle East Eye, Prince Khaled, who was given political asylum in Germany in 2013, said that if Ahmed and Muqrin were to unite ranks then “99 percent of the members of the royal family, the security services and the army would stand behind them”.

    Prince Khaled is a distant member of the Saudi royal family. But Riyadh is sensitive to any member breaking ranks, however distant he may be to the line of succession, and has tried to lure him back.

    The prince said that recent statements by Mamduh bin Abdulaziz, one of the eldest surviving brothers of King Salman, indicated wider resentment within the family as a whole.

    “There is so much anger within the royal family,” Prince Khaled said, “I took this information and appeal to my uncles Ahmed and Muqrin, who are the sons of Abdulaziz and are highly educated, well versed and able to change things for the better. I can say that we are all behind them and support them.”

    Ahmed bin Abdulaziz, a former deputy minister of interior and minister of the interior, retains the support of important sections of the security forces and the tribes, the prince said. Muqrin bin Abdulaziz was initially appointed crown prince by his brother Salman, only to be replaced by Muhammed bin Nayef in April 2015: he in turn was replaced by current incumbent Mohammed bin Salman, sometimes known as MBS, in June 2017.

    Prince Khaled said he had received a large number of emails from people within the police and army in support of his call. “I perceived from them that they are appealing, rather than demanding, to Prince Ahmed bin Abdulaziz to take an initiative to change the current situation.”

    rest here

    http://www.middleeasteye.net/news/co...mbs-1776042904








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  8. #65
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    Re: Saudi Arabia’s new Crown Prince

    Salaam

    More comment.

    Is MBS’s Westernization Drive a Catalyst for Modernity or Vassal State?

    The recent appointment of a minister for culture comes hot on the heels of MBS’s determination to modernize the Saudi state. This raises the awkward question as to what Saudi Arabia will look like at the end of this modernization process.

    Comment:

    As part of the new modernization drive to realise the country’s 2030 Vision, the Saudi government is eager to promote fashion shows, concerts, wrestling matches, and to encourage free mixing between men and women. Nevertheless, does the government really think that by providing different forms entertainment and opening up the country to greater tourism, Saudi Arabia will resemble a modern state?

    According the modernization theorists, the key differentiating factor between a traditional society and a modern one is industrializations and advanced technology. On both accounts, Saudi Arabia is woefully behind the industrialized world despite possessing one of the world’s largest oil reserves. After 86 years of independence from Britain, Saudi Arabia remains a backwater state—a largesse bequeath by the Saudi monarchy.

    No matter how hard Mohammed bin Salman (MBS) and his acolytes try to Westernize Saudis, the country is very far from modernization. However, one may argue that Neon City—the $500 billion project to build the next Dubai in Saudi Arabia—is an effort to obtain advanced technologies. This is true, but it is only an effort, which is largely dependent upon the goodwill of Western multinationals. There is no indication that these companies will sell their technology secrets to spur Saudi Arabia’s modernization. After all, Dubai tried a similar venture with Dubai Silicon Oasis (DSO) and ended up with yet another unwanted real estate project.

    The West is the major reason why such endeavors fail to transform traditional societies into an oasis of modernity. The West jealously guards its industrial practices, advanced technologies and intellectual patents, and this enables it to colonize the rest of the world and spread its hegemony. Hence, the simpleton MBS is wrong to think that modernization can be bought.

    Dependency theorists have long pointed out the shortcomings of the modernization process and demonstrated how industrialization and advanced technologies are exploited by the West countries to make traditional societies forever dependent on the West. In this respect, what is unfolding in Saudi Arabia is not modernization but subjugation of the entire country to Americanization—another vassal state in Pax Americana’s treasury.

    Had the rulers of Saudi Arabia embraced Islam as an ideology, they could have easily avoided this trap. Islam mandates self-sufficiency in all its forms i.e. in economics, politics, social, educational and technical spheres. At the heart of self-sufficiency drive is to use the Islamic ideology as a platform for revival and expansion. This means indigenous industrialization practices supplementing a war economy will inevitably produce breakthrough technologies that will cement the Muslim world’s pre-eminence over the world. For several centuries, the Islamic state used the above formula to maintain the ascendency of Islam in world affairs.

    http://www.khilafah.com/is-mbss-westernization-drive-a-catalyst-for-modernity-or-vassal-state/?utm_campaign=shareaholic&utm_medium=twitter&utm_s ource=socialnetwork

  9. #66
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    Re: Saudi Arabia’s new Crown Prince

    Salaam

    The sociopaths at the Economist weigh in with their 'considered' opinion.

    Can Muhammad bin Salman’s gamble work?

    The Saudi crown prince has antagonised clerics, princes and businessmen


    MUHAMMAD BIN SALMAN has accumulated power like no other Saudi royal. He has taken control of the economy, the armed forces, the national guard and the intelligence services. Yet, in the process, the crown prince has undermined all the pillars of the Saudi state. He has antagonised Al Saud princes by taking their fiefs. He has broken with Wahhabi clerics by denying them the power to enforce public morality. He has upset businessmen by raising their costs and forcing some of them to hand over part of their wealth. And he is undoing parts of the rentier system that served to buy the loyalty of the people.

    Perhaps the crown prince is moving so fast on social reform to keep his opponents off-balance. But it makes for erratic government: austerity measures are imposed and then removed; appointments are made and unmade. A backlash would surprise nobody. Rumours of coups may be false, but say much about the mood. Many remember the assassination of King Faisal in 1975 in a family dispute that was ultimately about the introduction of television. The current silence of clerics leads some officials to think that the worst danger is past. Others feel unnerved. “I support the change, but I am afraid of the speed of change,” says one ex-official, “The religious people are quiet for now. Will they continue to be quiet, or will they react violently?”

    A Saudi businessman says royal rulers, in their volte-face on puritanism, “have been exposed as hypocrites”. He thinks social liberalisation “will cause debates in every family”; the anti-corruption measures were arbitrary; and despite talk of promoting the private sector, Saudi Arabia remains “a family business”. Right now the crown prince acts with the authority of the king and controls the coercive powers of state. Beyond that, he casts himself as the champion of women and the young against the corrupt old elites. But in the absence of political parties, or real consultation, it will be hard for him to turn popularity into a political force. And popularity may prove fickle.

    “He has many enemies. If they see he is weak they will pounce on him,” says one Gulf minister. His advice to the West? “Support Saudi Arabia. Support Saudi Arabia. Support Saudi Arabia.” The crown prince has created an unexpected opportunity to change the discourse about Islam, he says. “If it can be more moderate then we will all reap the benefits.” Some diplomats think King Salman, now 82, will step down to ensure that his son ascends the throne.

    In many ways, Saudi Arabia and other Gulf states are grappling with an old question: why has Arab civilisation fallen into such an abject state? Arabs give one of two contradictory answers: “because we have strayed from the path of our righteous forebears” or “because we have failed to embrace Western modernity”.

    For decades Saudi leaders embraced the first answer, imposing religiosity in an attempt to recapture ancient Islamic glories. The bounty of oil made the model appear workable; Saudis could have both the good life and piety (those who disliked religiosity could always go abroad). But oil rents alone are no longer enough. And the notion that Islam can provide all the answers has hit a dead end, whether in the form of strict but obedient Saudi salafism, the political Islam of the Muslim Brotherhood or the murderous jihadism of al-Qaeda and Islamic State.

    Successive Saudi leaders might have looked out of their palaces and marvelled at how far their country has come. The young crown prince instead appears to notice how far it has been left behind: the Israelis are richer and know how to fight; the Emiratis live better and have more fun; the perfidious Iranian riyal seems to buy more friends than the Saudi one; and the West is less of a guardian than it used to be. “What has Saudi Arabia contributed to the world?” asks the Saudi businessman. “Mecca and Medina? They were made by God. We have not contributed one thing. If the oil goes, we will not even have water.”

    So Muhammad bin Salman is pursuing a form of modernisation, albeit of a strange, upside-down sort. Diversification and liberalisation are directed from the royal palace; even simple entertainment requires central planning and a “giga-project”. And more social freedom is accompanied by greater political repression. “Muhammad bin Salman is doing many of the things I have been fighting for: empowering women, fighting radicalism and purging corruption,” says Jamal Khashoggi, a Saudi columnist exiled in America. “That’s great news. But why intimidate people? Why arrest people? This is the model of Arab dictators like Gamal Abdel Nasser.”

    The crown prince is thus repeating one tragedy of the Arab world—liberalisation by illiberal means. In doing so he may be heeding Niccolò Machiavelli’s advice that it is better for a prince to be feared than loved. But there is an all-important rider to the dictum: “A prince ought to inspire fear in such a way that, if he does not win love, he avoids hatred.”

    https://www.economist.com/special-re...ns-gamble-work
    Last edited by Junon; 06-25-2018 at 06:40 PM.

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    Re: Saudi Arabia’s new Crown Prince

    Salaam

    Another update, more on how the the Gulf rulers operate.

    Blurb

    How WikiLeaks cables paint UAE motive for Qatar blockade US embassy cables appear to establish the UAE as the driving force behind the Gulf crisis and a broader crackdown on Muslim Brotherhood. By: Andrew Chappelle

    As Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Bahrain and Egypt started their campaign to isolate Qatar on June 5, 2017, accusing it of aiding “terrorism” and being too close to Iran, the messaging used by the Arab quartet struck a familiar tone. The blockade against Qatar, now nearing the one-year mark, is often referred to as Saudi-led, but the language used by the “Arab quartet” has been consistent with private statements attributed to UAE Crown Prince Mohamed bin Zayed (also known as MBZ), as revealed in diplomatic cables published by WikiLeaks in 2010 and 2011.



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    Re: Saudi Arabia’s new Crown Prince

    Salaam

    The pathetic Blair has returned, now he's advising the Saudis on modernisation! Judging by his past record do they really want to trust his advice?




    Blair advising Saudi under £9m deal between country and his institute: Report


    Ex-PM's group said to reach 'not for profit' deal earlier this year to help support Saudi's modernisation programme

    Tony Blair is advising the Saudi government under a £9m ($11.8m) deal with his "institute for global change", the Sunday Telegraph reported.

    The former UK prime minister's group reached an agreement earlier this year to help support Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman's modernisation programme, under a "not for profit" arrangement, the Telegraph reported.

    Saudi Arabia’s Vision 2030 is an ambitious programme of reforms intended to open up and diversify the kingdom's oil-centric economy by selling public assets, including a stake in world’s biggest oil producer Aramco, and reinvesting the funds.

    The deal is the first major agreement to have emerged involving the Tony Blair Institute (TBI), which Blair established in 2016 after winding down his commercial operations, the Telegraph said.



    The newspaper said that the institute received a $10m payment in January for the work, which is being carried out by its staff based in the Middle East.

    The payment was made from Media Investment (MIL), a Guernsey-registered firm that is a subsidiary of the Saudi Research and Marketing Group, according to the Telegraph.

    Sources told the newspaper that the total provided to the institute so far exceeded $12m. The funding is not mentioned on the institute's website, in spite of a subsequent post praising Saudi Arabia and its crown prince.

    Blair's office said the institute was "under no duty to disclose donors or donations", and declined to say what discussions Blair had held with members of the Saudi royal family or government about the funding.

    Asked about the deal, a spokesman confirmed to the Telegraph that TBI “has received a donation from MIL” for the “not for profit” work of the institution.

    “We work to support the Saudi change programme”, the spokesman told the Telegraph, adding that the work would be included in the institute's first annual report.

    Last month in London, Blair has reiterated a call for the West to ally with Russia to fight the threat of "terrorism".

    Blair said that although there would always be "disagreements" with Russia and its president, Vladimir Putin, the need to tackle militant activity made cooperation necessary.

    Last July, A British court blocked an attempt by a former Iraqi general to bring a private prosecution against Blair over his government’s involvement in the Iraq war.

    In 2016, Blair, who after leaving office embarked on a second career as a Middle East diplomat, was successful in hammering out a deal that saw Qatar pay $30m towards the wages of public-sector workers in Gaza, senior sources within Hamas told MEE.

    http://www.middleeasteye.net/news/bl...ort-1679707539

    Lessons of the past



    Last edited by Junon; 3 Weeks Ago at 08:06 AM.

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    Re: Saudi Arabia’s new Crown Prince

    Salaam

    Another update

    Blurb

    Saudi Arabia is spending half-a-trillion dollars on coastal resorts and an entertainment complex to try and attract more tourists. It's part of the crown prince's plan to diversify the country's economy away from oil. Will it work?


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    Re: Saudi Arabia’s new Crown Prince

    Salaam

    More on the pathetic Blair.


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    Re: Saudi Arabia’s new Crown Prince

    Quote Originally Posted by Junon View Post
    Salaam

    Another update

    Blurb

    Saudi Arabia is spending half-a-trillion dollars on coastal resorts and an entertainment complex to try and attract more tourists. It's part of the crown prince's plan to diversify the country's economy away from oil. Will it work?


    God knows if this guy is high on the amphetamines his cousins were trafficking. I know he's financially well off and from his position and that of his social circles can see a market for fun fairs and luxury resorts, but honestly this guy and his advisors need to consider the fact that with an imminent global financial collapse - his fun-fair fanfare risks a huge flop with the likelihood of flopping very high, plus he'd be aiming at a piece of the pie Dubai already has, and has a head start on, and they'd both be competing like american girls at street corners.....lifting their hem line higher every time they notice a decline in punters.
    Wouldn't he do better to focus on hajj tours which don't simply depend on entertainment, enterprises such as rail lines for transporting cattle and people at lower costs, processing stockable foods and Qurbani halal meat and non-Qurbani halal meat, and manufacturing such items that work (even if slow) in times of economic crisis, agricultural machinery including robots etc, bringing de-salinated and/or aquifier fed fresh water to the deserts, omg he holds the trust of the people of a peninsula surrounded by water routes for business ports and the resources to gain a monopoly on multiple regional goods, and he also has the opportunity to create jobs for his people.
    I hope he stops thinking like a pre-teen and starts thinking seriously about his citizens.

    Last edited by Abz2000; 1 Week Ago at 09:05 AM.
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    Re: Saudi Arabia’s new Crown Prince

    Salaam

    Another update, Should be of interest.

    Blurb

    What started as a war of words on social media has turned into a full on diplomatic feud between The Kingdom Of Saudi Arabia and Canada. In response to a tweet from Canadian foreign minister, Chrystia Freeland regarding the arrest of human rights activist Samar Badawi in the Kingdom. The Saudi government has said Canada’s position is “an overt and blatant interference in the internal affairs of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.” Saudi Arabia has gone on to expel the Canadian ambassador and recalled their own ambassador from Canada. The Saudi state airline has also canceled all direct flights from the kingdom to Toronto.



    Blurb

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    Re: Saudi Arabia’s new Crown Prince

    It is a fact that many secularist governemt and non government groups and also secularist extremist individuals involved in media have been skewing and misrepresenting the facts when it comes to the actions of the government of saudi arabia and have been causing people to form falsely biased opinions of the actions of those in the saudi arabia.
    For example - the TIME media wing's piece on saudi women footballers was almost exclusively focused on representing saudi women as living in oppression and having to make do with walking around the block in sneakers instead of simply representing the facts as they are - mothers, sisters, and daughters taking a stroll in sneakers - one can easily see that a false bias is present in their difference on reporting incidents in secularist run countries - especially given the fact that it is secularist run regimes that have been involved in the oppressive manipulation of women in secularist run countries and also in non-secularist run countries through the killing and maiming of hundreds of thousands in Muslim majority countries, and through the promotion of lewdness and infidelity which is in direct rebellion against the true justice if Allah in all countries.

    Also another note - one notices that the secularist run media are constantly resorting to idols such as "canada" - whilst waving a flag in order to sway the opinions and biases of people despite the fact that canada does not have the ability of decision-making, wouldn't it be more appropriate to say "such and such specific individuals within the canadian government" so that people can form a more accurate opinion of what is actually happening and can over time decide whether they want to be represented by such people?
    These are mass cloaks of anonimity that are being used by the individuals using such populations as attempted shields and the potential consequences to the populations are dangerous.
    But then, that's usually the passive choice of the people who put themselves behind the decisions of their corrupt leaders and refuse to absolve themselves from the crimes of their leaders before Allah and before the people of the planet..... Responsibility it appears... has become a spread bet amongst whole populations operating under idol flags that neither see, nor hear, nor think, nor speak - and that's why idolators who actually (advertently or inadvertently) worship satan the persistent rebel against Allah always collectively lose.
    Last edited by Abz2000; 1 Week Ago at 10:15 AM.
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    Re: Saudi Arabia’s new Crown Prince

    Salaam

    Another update

    Trudeau defies Saudi Arabia and says Canada will stand up for human rights

    Canadian PM declines to withdraw calls for the release of jailed civil rights activist, suggesting diplomatic spat will continue

    Justin Trudeau has defied Saudi Arabia’s demand to withdraw Canada’s calls for the release of jailed civil rights activists and insisted that Canada will continue to defend human rights around the world, suggesting that the escalating diplomatic row between the two countries is set to continue.
    A tweet, then a trade freeze: latest row shows Saudi Arabia is asserting new rules
    Read more

    In his first public comments since the spat began, Canada’s prime minister said his government has been speaking directly to the kingdom in an effort to resolve what he called “a diplomatic difference of opinion”.

    Trudeau said Canada’s foreign minister had held a long conversation with her Saudi counterpart on Tuesday, but offered no details as to what the pair had discussed.

    “We continue to engage diplomatically and politically with the government of Saudi Arabia,” Trudeau told reporters on Wednesday. “We have respect for their importance in the world and recognise that they have made progress on a number of important issues.”

    He insisted, however, that his government would continue to press Saudi Arabia on its human rights record. “We will, at the same time, continue to speak clearly and firmly on issues of human rights at home and abroad wherever we see the need.”

    Trudeau’s comments came hours after Saudi Arabia’s foreign minister described the row as a “matter of national security,” telling reporters that the kingdom was still considering additional measures against Canada. He did not elaborate on what these measures could entail.

    “Canada needs to fix its big mistake,” Adel al-Jubeir told a news conference in Riyadh. “There is nothing to mediate. A mistake has been made and a mistake should be corrected.”

    In recent days, several countries have expressed support for Saudi Arabia, including Egypt and Russia, which both told Ottawa that it was unacceptable to lecture the kingdom on human rights.

    “We have always said that the politicisation of human rights matters is unacceptable,” Maria Zakharova, a spokesperson for Russia’s foreign ministry, told reporters on Wednesday. “What one probably needs in this situation is constructive advice and assistance rather than criticism from a ‘moral superior’,” she added.

    Meanwhile, the United States – one of Canada’s closest allies – has so far refused to wade into the row, describing both countries as close allies in a written statement from the state department.

    “It’s up for the government of Saudi Arabia and the Canadians to work this out,” said Heather Nauert, a spokesperson for the state department, on Tuesday. “Both sides need to diplomatically resolve this together. We can’t do it for them.”

    The United Kingdom was similarly muted in its response, with a foreign office spokesperson saying: “Canada and Saudi Arabia are both close partners of the UK, and we urge restraint during the current situation,” a foreign office spokeswoman said.

    When asked whether Canada was prepared to apologise to Saudi Arabia, Trudeau – who in recent years has come under fire for signing off on the sale of more than 900 armoured vehicles to Riyadh – skirted the question. “Canadians have always expected our government to speak strongly and firmly, clearly and politely, about the need to respect human rights around the world. We will continue to do that,” he said.

    He also dodged a question about the perceived reluctance of the US administration to back Canada in the dispute. “We recognise that every country has the right to make their own decisions when it comes to diplomacy and international relations,” he said. “I’m never going to impose on another country what their reactions should be or what their response should be.”

    The spat appeared to have been sparked last week when Canada’s foreign ministry expressed its concern over the arrest of Saudi civil society and women’s rights activists.

    Saudi Arabia shot back on Sunday, expelling the Canadian ambassador and freezing new trade with Canada.

    In the days following the kingdom has continued to pile on measures against Canada, including plans to remove thousands of Saudi students and medical patients from Canada and the suspension of flights to and from Canada on Saudi Arabia’s state airline.

    Saudi Arabia’s main state wheat buying agency, the Saudi Grains Organization, has also told grains exporters it will no longer accept Canadian-origin grains in its international purchase tenders, while the Saudi central bank instructed its asset managers overseas to dispose of Canadian equity, bonds and cash holdings, regardless of the cost, according to the Financial Times.

    Analysts and regional officials say that Riyadh’s actions have little to do with Canada; instead, the kingdom’s actions are a broader signal to western governments that any criticism of its domestic policies is unacceptable.

    As Saudi-Canadian trade hovers around $4bn, the country was likely seen as an easy fall guy in the kingdom’s bid to reinforce this message, said Bessma Momani, a political science professor at Canada’s University of Waterloo. “Canada is an easy target because our bilateral economic ties are limited.”

    Saudi Arabia’s actions likely had the tacit support of Washington, particularly as they targeted Trudeau – a self-declared feminist who has loudly championed progressive policies, she said. “And let’s be honest, the Trump administration, particularly Donald Trump, who has shown animosity to Justin Trudeau, is probably not too sad to see having this government be in the international limelight and be rebuked by the Saudis.”

    Others have contexualised the kingdom’s actions as part of a bold new foreign policy unleashed by the country’s powerful crown prince, Mohammed bin Salman.

    Projecting strength has become a central concern of the 32-year-old heir to the throne. So has upsetting allies, and starting rows without an apparent follow-up plan.

    Meanwhile state-run media in Saudi Arabia said the country had executed and “crucified” a man from Myanmar convicted of killing a woman and carrying out other crimes.

    When asked on Wednesday about its decision to arrest the activists at the heart of the diplomatic row, Saudi Arabia’s foreign minister said that charges against them would be made public once their cases reach the courts and repeated earlier allegations that they had been in touch with foreign entities.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/aug/08/saudi-arabia-canada-latest-egypt-russia

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    Re: Saudi Arabia’s new Crown Prince

    Salaam

    Another update

    EU abandoned public statement supporting Canada in row with Saudi: Report

    European envoys decided against criticising Riyadh over its latest diplomatic spat, choosing to voice their discontent in a letter instead


    European Union ambassadors met with Saudi Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir last week to deliver a private diplomatic note related to the Saudi-Canadian feud after dropping plans to issue a public statement on the matter, a news report has revealed.

    According to Buzzfeed News, an EU delegation met with Jubeir in Riyadh to deliver a formal diplomatic note - known as a demarche - to Saudi Arabia, discussing the Gulf kingdom’s human rights record.

    The delegation also raised concerns about Saudi Arabia’s diplomatic crisis with Canada. This came as the EU reportedly dropped plans to release a public statement criticising Riyadh over its role in the row following discussions among member states.

    The note was found to be a more appropriate way of raising the matter with Saudi Arabia, Buzzfeed reported, citing three EU officials.

    When asked to comment on the report, the EU told Middle East Eye it did not respond to press reports.

    "The EU has engaged constructively on the ground with the Saudi authorities. In our policy, we use all the relevant tools, as needed," a spokesperson said.

    The Saudi-Canadian spat was triggered by a tweet by the Canadian foreign ministry on 3 August, which urged Saudi Arabia to “immediately release” the women’s rights and human rights activists held in Saudi jails.

    Saudi Arabia responded by recalling its ambassador, suspending trade and flights to and from Canada, and forcing Saudi students and patients to leave the North American country, among other measures.

    Canada has repeatedly called for the release of Saudi women’s rights defenders, including Samar Badawi, the sister of detained activist Raid Badawi, whose wife is a Canadian citizen.

    On Saturday, EU foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini's spokeswoman said that the European Union had sought clarification from Saudi Arabia regarding the arrest of women's rights activists.

    "We have been emphasising the relevance of the role of human rights defenders and civil society groups in the process of reform which the kingdom is pursuing, as well as the importance of respecting the rules of due process for all those arrested," she told Reuters.

    A statement by the Saudi-based Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) on Monday condemned the remarks as “a blatant interference in the internal affairs of Saudi Arabia, a member state of OIC”.

    https://www.middleeasteye.net/news/report-eu-retracted-public-statement-canada-saudi-feud-824727942

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