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'150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan
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    '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

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    Salaam

    Another update on the situation in Afghanistan

    Rare interviews with militants shine light on resilient movement that resisted both Obama’s surge and now Trump’s ‘killing terrorists’ strategy

    Squatting on the floor, a brown shawl draped over his shoulders, the Taliban commander and his bodyguard swiped on their phones through attack footage edited to look like video games, with computerised crosshairs hovering over targets. “Allahu Akbar,” they said every time a government Humvee hit a landmine.

    Mullah Abdul Saeed, who met the Guardian in the barren backcountry of Logar province where he leads 150 Taliban militants, has fought foreign soldiers and their Afghan allies since the US-led coalition invaded Afghanistan when he was 14. The Taliban now controls its largest territory since being forced from power, and seems to have no shortage of recruits.

    By prolonging and expanding its military presence in Afghanistan, the US aims to coerce the Taliban to lay down arms, but risks hardening insurgents who have always demanded withdrawal of foreign troops before peace talks.

    In interviews with rank-and-file Taliban fighters in Logar and another of Afghanistan’s embattled provinces, Wardak, the Guardian found a fragmented but resilient movement, united in resistance against foreign intervention.

    Referring to Barack Obama’s surge, Saeed said: “150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us.” And an extra 4,000 US soldiers, as Donald Trump will deploy, “will not change the morale of our mujahideen,” he said. “The Americans were walking in our villages, and we pushed them out.” For the Taliban to consider peace, he said, “foreigners must leave, and the constitution must be changed to sharia.”

    Active Taliban footsoldiers rarely agree to meet western reporters. Men such as Saeed, who spoke without leadership permission, provide valuable insight into a movement that after 16 years in armed opposition remains largely an enigma.

    Arriving on a motorbike kicking up dust, Saeed and his Kalashnikov-carrying bodyguard, Yamin, were aloof at first but warmed as the conversation evolved. Saeed said that as the war has changed, the Taliban have adjusted, too. US soldiers now predominantly train Afghans, and have ramped up airstrikes.

    “It’s true, it has become harder to fight the Americans. But we use suicide bombers, and we will use more of them,” Saeed said. “If the US changes its tactics of fighting, so do we.” That change has meant ever-fiercer attacks, with large truck bombs in populated areas and audacious assaults on military bases.

    In April, Taliban fighters in army uniforms stormed a northern army academy and killed at least 150 soldiers in the biggest assault on the army of the entire war. This month, suicide bombers wiped out a whole army unit, ramming two Humvees packed with explosives into a base in Kandahar.

    As Saeed spoke, three young boys from the civilian family at the house where the interview took place brought tea. They giggled as they listened in on the fighters’ radio. Saeed spoke with a calm, professorial demeanour but his words brimmed with the anger of a man who has spent his adult life fighting a generation-long war, and lost 12 family members doing it.

    Pressed on the record-high number of civilian deaths in the war, he said the Taliban “make mistakes” and try to avoid harming civilians, but added: “If there is an infidel in a flock of sheep, you are permitted to attack that flock of sheep.”

    The Taliban was always outnumbered and technologically outmatched by its foreign adversaries, but is arguably at its strongest since 2001, threatening several provincial capitals. The movement, though, is divided, with some lower-ranking commanders backing rivals of the current chief, Mawlawi Haibatullah, or more radical outfits such as Islamic State. But rifts have not stopped the group from advancing.

    Saeed claimed: “10-15 people join the mujahideen [in Logar] every day, sometimes also policemen,” adding that mistreatment by government and foreign forces helps recruitment.

    “Many Taliban become suicide bombers after prison. Why?” he asked, describing how prison guards torture detainees by applying air pressure, beatings or electric shock to their genitals. After a detainee is released, he said, the shame is too much to bear. Such claims of government torture have been documented by the UN.

    While few in the international community think the war can be won militarily, the US shows little intention of reviving the dormant peace process. “We are not nation-building again. We are killing terrorists,” Trump said when announcing his south Asia strategy. “In the end we will win.” Crucially, Trump has not established criteria for when US troops will be pulled home.

    In a separate interview in the beleaguered Wardak province, Omari, 23, who has six years’ frontline experience, told the Guardian he had considered leaving the insurgency and taking his family to Kabul. “But if the Americans come back to Wardak, I will fight them,” he said. Omari was less cavalier than Saeed about civilian casualties, which he said damaged the Taliban’s standing with ordinary Afghans, who have become more reluctant to shelter them.

    Yet, the two militants did agree on one thing: American soft power is as dangerous as uniformed soldiers, especially as US troops have dwindled in numbers. That belief materialised last year when militants, in a stunningly grisly attack, stormed the American University in Kabul, killing 16 students and staff members. In the capital, many regard the university as one of the pinnacles of post-Taliban Afghanistan.

    Though no group claimed responsibility for the attack, Saeed and Omari agreed the university posed a threat. “We should kill those teachers who change the minds of society,” Saeed said.

    Currently, the Taliban seem capable of upholding a slow-burning war, with the help of outside benefactors. After recent US pressure on Pakistan to crack down on militant sanctuaries, some Taliban fighters consider opting for another regional neighbour, Omari said: “Many Taliban want to leave Pakistan for Iran. They don’t trust Pakistan anymore.”

    Pakistan denies harbouring militants, but Saeed admitted receiving assistance from Pakistan, though he denied being under anyone’s thumb. “Having relations is one thing, taking orders is something else,” he said. “Every party, if they want to be stronger, need to talk to other countries. We should talk to Iran, and we should talk to Pakistan. Just like the Afghan government goes to India and China.”

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/oct/31/150000-americans-couldnt-beat-us-taliban-fighters-defiant-in-afghanistan

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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    I truly sympathy with Afghans but I don't believe Taliban is the answer to the problem ( suicide bomber)
    1 | Likes Mustafa16 liked this post

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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    Salaam

    They are resisting the occupier but I agree with doing wrong is wrong regardless. It might be a forlorn hope but I hope the Afghans can find a solution to their problems with minimal outside interference (regional actors etc). The sooner the Americans leave the better.

    Just a reminder of what it has been like.

    I posted the short version a couple of years back, heres the full version.


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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    May Allah Azza wa Jal give the Muslims in Afghanistan victory. Ameen.
    '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    "When a person sees the road as too long, he weakens in his walk." - Ibn Qayyim al-Jawziyyah

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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    Salaam

    Another update

    Afghanistan: Sending More Troops Adds Insult to Blood & Misery

    It is not about humanitarian aid or helping the Afghan people but about political and strategic control of this very important area

    The announcement that the British government is to send 400 plus troops to Afghanistan – bringing British troops there to over 1000 – gives the lie to the idea that the end of the war is in sight. The reverse is true. Islamic State has grown, the Taliban control large parts of the country and there is no security for the ordinary people of Kabul.

    There is never any explanation why this happens, because to try to do so would be to admit that the war launched by George Bush and Tony Blair nearly two decades ago has been an abject failure. The war on terror has not ended terrorism but has greatly increased it in Afghanistan and the Middle East.

    We were told this war ended more than 16 years ago. Since then countless lives have been lost and Afghans live in a war torn and dangerous country. Sending more troops is only compounding the problems.

    Theresa May has done this to please Trump. He is demanding greater military commitment and their ‘special relationship’ means that she is determined to agree. The consequences for British people are more spending on the military, and the risk to British troops sent to fight in this wasteful and unnecessary war.

    It is not about humanitarian aid or helping the Afghan people but about political and strategic control of this very important area.

    The US under Obama said they would withdraw troops, but reversed their decision, and there are now 16,000 US troops there. They do not need this additional number of British troops except for political reasons. We should refuse to accept this right-wing bidding war which is ruining so many lives. Time to get all the troops out.

    http://www.stopwar.org.uk/index.php/...o-blood-misery

    They always seem to 'forget' the kind of reception they receive from the natives.


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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    Salaam

    This is unusual, like to share

    Blurb

    Injured in 1980 while fighting the Afghan Mujahideen, Bakhretdin Khakimov has long been presumed dead. However, 33 years later, the former Soviet intelligence officer was discovered alive and well in Herat under the new name Sheikh Abdullah, having married an Afghan woman and converted to Islam.



    Blurb

    “First tell us what you did in Afghanistan all those years. Then we'll decide whether or not we can shake hands,” said Gennady-Nikmamat's fellow soldiers after he had been assumed to be a traitor and disappeared for 29 years. This is the unique story of Gennady-Nikmamat, a former Soviet soldier who was captured by the Mujahideen during the Soviet war in Afghanistan. He was presumed a turncoat, which carried a criminal penalty if he ever returned to his homeland. Thus he had no choice but to stay in Afghanistan and adopt a Muslim way of life. Gennady-Nikmamat married an Afghan woman, had four children with her and has lived a full life, but he never abandoned the dream of returning home. After finally coming back to Ukraine to see his relatives and visit his parents' graves for the first time, he still can't decide whether it was better that he survived or if he should have ended up just another unknown soldier lost in the turmoil of war.


    Last edited by Junon; 07-23-2018 at 07:28 PM.

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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    Salaam

    Another update

    Afghans march hundreds of kilometres for peace

    It started as a group of nine men. Now dozens have joined and are walking 700km - from Helmand to Kabul - while fasting to call for an end to decades of devastating war and violence.


    It started as a group of nine Afghan men who set out from Helmand to Kabul to raise their demand, "no more war".

    Now dozens have joined and are walking the 700km, while fasting, to call for an end to decades of devastating war and violence.

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2018/06/afghans-march-hundreds-kilometres-peace-180611154253770.html


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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    Salaam

    A chance of a negotiated settlement?


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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    Salaam

    Another update, what a surprise.

    Qatar, UAE to join US war in Afghanistan


    Qatar and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) are to join the longest conflict in US history, by supporting the NATO-led coalition in Afghanistan.

    Abu Dhabi and Doha will be part of a multi-nation fight codenamed “Operation Resolute Support”, according to the Washington Post. Both Gulf countries will focus on training and advising Afghan forces. Official numbers on how many troops will be deployed has not been disclosed but the military inclusion is set to be approved next week during NATO’s ministerial meeting in Brussels.

    Both Qatar and the UAE are rivals in the Gulf region, where Doha remains to endure an air, land and sea blockade over allegations of supporting terrorism and extremism. To add, President Donald Trump backed the allegations against Qatar last year. But Qatar continues to categorically deny the claims, and has since turned the tables by proving to the US that it is committed to combating terrorism. Trump has since repeatedly urged Gulf states to end the rift.

    Qatar has been vying to become a full-member of NATO to boost its security outlook but was rejected on the basis that only European countries could qualify, according to the Washington Treaty. Whether this was a major set back for which Doha is looking to prove worthiness in Afghanistan is unclear.

    The conflict in Afghanistan began in 2001, it saw the US lead 40 other countries to fight Al-Qaeda, the Taliban and associated forces who they said were responsible for the armed attack on the World Trade Centre in New York. Qatar’s cargo planes previously provided resupply missions to nations fighting in Afghanistan.

    Qatar played a “major role” in the Afghan conflict by opening a Taliban office in Doha, in a bid to broker a peace deal with the US. Despite the Taliban praising Qatar last year on their efforts to bring peace in Afghanistan, relations may soar with Qatar’s deployment in Afghanistan.

    Leaked emails from Emirati Ambassador to the US Yousef Al-Otaibi showed that the UAE was vying to open an office for the Taliban in its territories, however the group which governed Afghanistan setup a base in Qatar instead. UAE Foreign Minister Abdullah Bin Zayed was “angry” following the announcement.

    https://www.middleeastmonitor.com/20180709-qatar-uae-to-join-us-war-in-afghanistan/
    Last edited by Junon; 08-04-2018 at 08:19 PM.

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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    Salaam

    Why the reconstruction of Afghanistan failed.

    Blurb

    The US war in Afghanistan has raged for 16 years, since the US invaded after 9/11, in 2001. At the onset, a centerpiece of US strategy was to rebuild Afghanistan's crumbling infrastructure. This move expedited military logistics and maneuvers, while simultaneously reigniting travel between Afghanistan's major cities. But when the US started its war in Iraq, that diverted resources and manpower from the battlefield of Afghanistan. And the Taliban didn't miss the chance. To date, the most ambitious roadbuilding project, known as the Ring Road, has seen over $3 billion spent on its renewal. And it was never completed.


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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    Salaam

    Another update, another perspective.

    Afghanistan: The War That Shames America

    After 17 bloody years, the longest war in US history continues without relent or purpose in Afghanistan.

    There, a valiant, fiercely-independent people, the Pashtun (Pathan) mountain tribes, have battled the full might of the US Empire to a stalemate that has so far cost American taxpayers $4 trillion, and 2,371 dead and 20,320 wounded soldiers. No one knows how many Afghans have died. The number is kept secret.


    Pashtun tribesmen in the Taliban alliance and their allies are fighting to oust all foreign troops from Afghanistan and evict the western-imposed and backed puppet regime in Kabul that pretends to be the nation’s legitimate government. Withdraw foreign troops and the Kabul regime would last for only days.

    The whole thing smells of the Vietnam War. Lessons so painfully learned by America in that conflict have been completely forgotten and the same mistakes repeated. The lies and happy talk from politicians, generals and media continue apace.

    This week, Taliban forces occupied the important strategic city of Ghazni on the road from Peshawar to Kabul. It took three days and massive air attacks by US B-1 heavy bombers, Apache helicopter gun ships, A-10 ground attack aircraft, and massed warplanes from US bases in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Qatar and the 5th US Fleet to finally drive back the Taliban assault. Taliban also overran key military targets in Kabul and the countryside, killing hundreds of government troops in a sort of Afghan Tet offensive.

    Afghan regime police and army units put up feeble resistance or ran away. Parts of Ghazni were left in ruins. It was a huge embarrassment to the US imperial generals and their Afghan satraps who had claimed ‘the corner in Afghanistan has finally been turned.’

    Efforts by the Trump administration to bomb Taliban into submission have clearly failed. US commanders fear using American ground troops in battle lest they suffer serious casualties. Meanwhile, the US is running low on bombs.

    Roads are now so dangerous for the occupiers that most movement must be by air. Taliban is estimated to permanently control almost 50% of Afghanistan. That number would rise to 100% were it not for omnipresent US air power. Taliban rules the night.

    Taliban are not and never were ‘terrorists’ as Washington’s war propaganda falsely claimed. I was there at the creation of the movement – a group of Afghan religious students armed by Pakistan whose goal was to stop post-civil war banditry, the mass rape of women, and to fight the Afghan Communists. When Taliban gained power, it eliminated 95% of the rampant Afghanistan opium-heroin trade. After the US invaded, allied to the old Afghan Communists and northern Tajik tribes, opium-heroin production soared to record levels. Today, US-occupied Afghanistan is the world’s largest producer of opium, morphine and heroin.

    US occupation authorities claim drug production is run by Taliban. This is another big lie. The Afghan warlords who support the regime of President Ashraf Ghani entirely control the production and export of drugs. The army and secret police get a big cut. How else would trucks packed with drugs get across the border into Pakistan and Central Asia?

    The United States has inadvertently become one of the world’s leading drug dealers. This is one of the most shameful legacies of the Afghan War. But just one. Watching the world’s greatest power bomb and ravage little Afghanistan, a nation so poor that some of its people can’t afford sandals, is a huge dishonor for Americans.

    Even so, the Pashtun defeated the invading armies of Alexander the Great, Genghis Khan, Tamerlane, the Mogul Emperors and the mighty British Raj. The US looks to be next in the Graveyard of Empires.

    Nobody in Washington can enunciate a good reason for continuing the colonial war in Afghanistan. One hears talk of minerals, women’s rights and democracy as a pretext for keeping US forces in Afghanistan. All nonsense. A possible real reason is to deny influence over Afghanistan, though the Chinese are too smart to grab this poisoned cup. They have more than enough with their rebellious Uighur Muslims.

    Interestingly, the so-called ‘terrorist training camps’ supposedly found in Afghanistan in 2001 were actually guerilla training camps run by Pakistani intelligence to train Kashmiri rebels and CIA-run camps for exiled Uighur fighters from China.

    The canard that the US had to invade Afghanistan to get at Osama bin Laden, alleged author of the 9/11 attacks, is untrue. The attacks were made by Saudis and mounted from Hamburg and Madrid, not Afghanistan. I’m not even sure bin Laden was behind the attacks.

    My late friend and journalist Arnaud de Borchgrave shared my doubts and insisted that the Taliban leader Mullah Omar offered to turn bin Laden over to a court in a Muslim nation to prove his guilt or innocence.

    President George Bush, caught sleeping on guard duty and humiliated, had to find an easy target for revenge – and that was Afghanistan.

    https://www.globalresearch.ca/israels-intention-to-annex-the-west-bank-revealed/5651305?platform=hootsuite

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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    Salaam

    Like to share

    Blurb


    India has sought to establish its presence in Afghanistan from the early days of its independence from Britain in 1947. In 1950, Afghanistan and India signed a "Friendship Treaty." India had robust ties with Afghan King Zahir Shah’s regime. Prior to the Soviet invasion in 1979, New Delhi continued to formalized agreements and protocols with various pro-Soviet regimes in Kabul. But what are India's strategic political and economic interests there? In this video, we will look at India's interests in Afghanistan.


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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    It is not a Muslim's nature to be defiant, rather an intelligent and obedient Muslim's actions and objectives are defined by humility and obedience to Allah with clear thought of what is best in Allah 's sight.

    I believe that the tualibaan (if they are knowledgeably striving for Allah's sake) would never refer to themselves as defiant, and neither would Allah - rather they would define themselves as those who strive to uphold justice for Allah's sake.
    '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan













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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    Salaam

    Another update





    CAGE adds key evidence of 17 years of human rights violations since 9/11 – and the US threatens the ICC for seeking accountability

    CAGE as well as survivors of US war crimes in Afghanistan are involved in an unprecedented case against the US administration at the International Criminal Court, which has resulted in the US facing accusations of war crimes in Afghanistan.

    CAGE outreach director Moazzam Begg and several other survivors of US abuse in the ‘Salt Pit’, the ‘Dark Prison’, Kandahar and Bagram have brought evidence forward attesting to the way in which the US administration, under the guise of bringing those responsible for the 9/11 attacks to justice, has arrested, tortured and held without trial or charge hundreds if not thousands of innocent people.

    Despite this evidence, the US is adopting an attitude of denial and belligerence, threatening to arrest members of the ICC and calling it a “dying” organisation. This demonstrates clearly the US’s rejection of any semblance of international justice, in favour of protecting its military industrial complex and its geopolitical interests at the expense of ensuring a global standard of accountability and ethics.

    Moazzam Begg, outreach director for CAGE, said:


    “The case we have lodged with the ICC is unprecedented and it comes at a crucial time, where the words ‘national security’ and ‘terrorism’ are useful labels used to silence dissent and muzzle those that seek justice. We urge the ICC to stand up to these threats by the United States and continue to call them out for what they are: a threat to international stability.”

    “It is quite extraordinary and telling that the US has threatened to prosecute and place sanctions against ICC officials and anyone aiding them in seeking accountability for US involvement in war crimes in Afghanistan. The Taliban and Afghan Army who are also being investigated have made not made any such threats.”

    “Thousands were killed in the 9/11 attacks, but in the wake of this terrible event, the US has caused the death of over 1 million people, mostly Muslims, directly or indirectly in its war in Iraq and Afghanistan. The time has come to put a stop to this war machine, so that justice and accountability can be restored.”

    https://www.cage.ngo/cage-adds-key-evidence-of-17-years-of-human-rights-violations-since-9-11-and-the-us-threatens-the-icc-for-seeking-accountability

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