× Register Login What's New! Contact us
Page 5 of 5 First ... 3 4 5
Results 81 to 86 of 86
  1. #1
    Array Junon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    UK
    Gender
    Male
    Religion
    Islam
    Posts
    3,454
    Threads
    319
    Reputation
    5935
    Rep Power
    71

    It looks like Imran Khan is about to become Pakistan's prime minister (OP)


    Salaam

    Change in Pakistan, wonder if he will make a difference?

    here's what we can expect of him

    Even a genuinely reformist candidate in the state has to find some kind of accommodation with the military – but that appeasement also carries the risk that the occupant of the presidential palace will find his middle class followers disillusioned


    It is tempting to see the rise of Imran Khan in Pakistan as a sort of counterpart to the En Marche! phenomenon in France that propelled Emmanuel Macron to power. As Mr Khan enjoys a surge in support for his party, Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (Pakistan Movement for Justice, or PTI), and every chance of winning the elections this week, there are some parallels between the young French president and the youthful (though 65-year-old) Mr Khan.

    Mr Khan enjoys a legendary charisma, mostly born of his cricketing prowess, as if Gareth Southgate or Harry Kane were running to be prime minister of Britain. We know him in Britain too as the former husband of Jemima Goldsmith, and thus brother-in-law to her brother Zac.

    He has glamour, then, and a common touch that has seen his party make inroads in the populous Punjab, without which none can rule in Pakistan. Mr Khan has also made radical, reformist noises, pledged to rid his land of endemic corruption, and, more predictably, attacked the United States from its drone powered incursions into the Islamic Republic’s territory.

    Mr Khan, in other words, promises much, and, like Mr Macron, founded and still leads his own political party, which at times is not much more than a fan club for its handsome head. (Though the basically populist PTI is much older than En Marche!)

    Mr Khan and the PTI has done well in recent years in building support, mainly at the expense of two older parties, the vaguely progressive Pakistan Peoples Party, currently led by another member of the Bhutto dynasty, and the more conservative Pakistan Muslim League – Nawaz (PML-N), whose ex-leader, and former prime minister, Nawaz Sharif, was recently jailed on corruption charges.

    All, however, is not what it seems. Mr Khan is widely regarded as being an ally of what remains the most powerful institution in the country and the only one, according to Mr Khan, that functions effectively – the army.

    The generals, a ruthless though stabilising force in Pakistani society, are reportedly “pre-rigging” the election in Mr Khan’s favour, including the arrest of Sharif (which is not to say that the move was unjust). It seems that the PTI has suffered less from electoral violence than some of its rivals, including a terror attack at a rally in Baluchistan that killed 149 people.

    Condemning corruption is not consistent with being cosy with the Pakistani army, a body that controls substantial chunks of the economy and has plenty of money and the muscle to get its way, on a national scale and by way of kickbacks and petty corruption and abuse of power. The army has frequently intervened in Pakistani politics, subverted democracy, and collaborated with religious extremists, including the Taliban in the 1980s, when young men such as Osama bin Laden were based there to fight America’s proxy war against the Soviet Union in Afghanistan.

    The legacy of that haunts Pakistan to this day. The result is that even a genuinely reformist candidate in the state has to find some kind of accommodation with the military; but that appeasement also carries the risk that the occupant of the presidential palace will find his middle class followers disillusioned. If he chooses instead to challenge the army, then, like Mr Sharif, he may find himself more or less gently deposed.

    Pakistan’s endemic problems with graft and corruption go a long way to explaining its long-term disappointing economic performance, despite a recent spate of growth. That matters in a predominantly young nation of some 200 million, and which must look with envy at what its neighbours India and China have been able to achieve in recent decades.

    If Mr Khan is unable to do much about the corruption, then he will find the economy works way below its potential, and foreign investors, already wary of political instability and the backwash of violence from Afghanistan, will prefer to put their euros, yen and dollars into India.

    Without economic growth, better public infrastructure, and opportunities, unemployment, health and education are harder to come by. Pakistan’s severe social problems, including the treatment of women and human rights generally, will remain intractable without money, something Mr Khan, a prominent philanthropist, at least shows awareness of.

    Last, Mr Khan is no better placed to deal with tribalism than his rivals. He too enjoys a regional base of support in Punjab, and has had to rely on old-school defecting politicians from other parties and prominent families to bolster his support. He optimistically describes these mercenary politicians as “electables”, though corruptibles might be a better sobriquet.

    Pakistan, then, may change under Mr Khan, and for the better, but it will take formidable skill to make this happen. Mr Khan has won for Pakistan many times on the cricket pitch; he will find his new job a much stickier wicket.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/editorials/imran-khan-pakistan-election-prime-minister-muslim-league-army-macron-en-marche-zac-goldsmith-a8460436.html

    An old interview.


  2. #81
    Junon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    UK
    Gender
    Male
    Religion
    Islam
    Posts
    3,454
    Threads
    319
    Reputation
    5935
    Rep Power
    71
    Likes (Given)
    459
    Likes (Received)
    525

    Re: It looks like Imran Khan is about to become Pakistan's prime minister

    Report bad ads?

    Salaam

    Like to share


  3. Report bad ads?
  4. #82
    Junon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    UK
    Gender
    Male
    Religion
    Islam
    Posts
    3,454
    Threads
    319
    Reputation
    5935
    Rep Power
    71
    Likes (Given)
    459
    Likes (Received)
    525

    Re: It looks like Imran Khan is about to become Pakistan's prime minister

    Salaam

    Like to share.

    Blurb

    Adnan shares his thoughts on the recent assassination of top Iranian general Qassem Soleimani by the U.S. and its implications for the region.

    He also discusses the current state of BJP-led India, with the rise of institutional Islamophobia and the introduction of various anti-Muslim laws like the Citizenship Amendment Act (CAA) and National Register of Citizens (NRC).

    Topics of discussion also include the formation of Pakistan, India's ongoing occupation of Kashmir, the history of the Subcontinent under Mughal rule, and how Islamic the Mughal Empire was in comparison to the Ottoman Empire.



  5. #83
    Junon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    UK
    Gender
    Male
    Religion
    Islam
    Posts
    3,454
    Threads
    319
    Reputation
    5935
    Rep Power
    71
    Likes (Given)
    459
    Likes (Received)
    525

    Re: It looks like Imran Khan is about to become Pakistan's prime minister

    Salaam

    Another update.

    More than 120 UK Muslim scholars issue open letter to PM Modi over Kashmir lockdown

    More than 120 Muslim scholars from the UK have sent Prime Minister Narendra Modi an open letter calling for an immediate end to India’s lockdown of occupied Kashmir.

    The letter which was sent to the Indian High Commission in London earlier this week began by stating:

    “This is an Open Letter to Prime Minister Narendra Modi of India, from the British Muslim Society of Scholars and Supporters. We are writing this letter so we can awaken human conscience to the suffering and plight of the Kashmiri people. The consequences of Mr Modi’s actions are grave indeed, and carry within them the possibility of huge loss of innocent lives, not just in the immediate theatre of conflict but far beyond. Great leaders have always been the ones who can find solutions to the most difficult situations, not those who create greater problems from situations they inherit, without doubt wisdom is the inheritance of the wise, and only the humble benefit from it. We advise you, dear reader, to read this letter with an open mind and heart, and evaluate the actions of the Indian state and their consequences for the wider human family, there’s no doubt that every soul shall return to his creator, and will be held accountable for what they sowed on earth.”

    The letter went onto state:

    “Dear Prime Minister Modi,

    “We the undersigned, write to you following your unilateral revocation of articles 370 and 35A of the

    “Indian Constitution, and the subsequent curfew banning phone, internet and free movement of the Kashmiri people and the arrest of all Kashmiri leadership. We are also cognisant of the Genocide alert issued by Dr. Gregory H. Stanton, Founder and President of Genocide Watch, on 15th August 2019, alerting the United Nations and its members that “Genocide Watch’s Ten Stages of the genocidal process are also far advanced”, in the case of Indian occupied Kashmir. We therefore demand that you:

    Outline a timetable for an immediate implementation of the United Nations resolution no.47, adopted by the Security Council on April 21, 1948. The basic formula for settlement was incorporated in the later resolutions. The provisions for these were negotiated thoroughly, through discussions under the auspices of U.N. Commission on India and Pakistan (UNCIP), and only after the consent of India and Pakistan, were these adopted by the U.N. Security Council. We remind you that it was Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru of India in 1948 who had sought the involvement of the United Nations. He had subsequently acknowledged the right of the Kashmiri people to determine their own destiny by stating in a report to the All India Congress Committee on July 6, 1951, ‘Kashmir has been wrongly looked upon as a prize for India or Pakistan.

    People seem to forget that Kashmir is not a commodity for sale or to be bartered. It has an individual existence and its people must be the final arbiters of their future.’

    We ask you therefore to implement the promises made to the Kashmiri people for their right to determine their destiny through a plebiscite. We remind you to take heed of Mahatma Gandhi’s wise words, ‘the evolution of democracy is not possible if we are not prepared to hear the other side.’

    Ensure the immediate lifting of the curfew imposed on the Kashmiri people on 5th August 2019, thereby allowing them the right to telecommunications, internet, transport and free movement.

    Allow access to international media and allow Kashmiri leadership to travel freely within and outside Kashmir.

    Establish an independent Human Rights tribunal to investigate crimes against humanity – the mass rape, torture, disappeared persons, mass graves and extrajudicial killings by Indian army and paramilitary forces in occupied Kashmir.

    “We wish to remind you that the path of hatred, division and violence that you have chosen for

    “India will not end well. Here we quote the inaugural holder of the seat you represent, Jawaharlal Nehru, who stated …’those who choose the path of violence have no faith in democracy. If their way were to prevail, there would be complete chaos in the country and the conditions of the people would deteriorate even more.’ His words are prescient in the light of your actions in Kashmir and your dealings with Indians of minority faiths.

    “We remind you of the words of Mahatma Gandhi, ‘First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.’ It is as if the Kashmiri peoples struggle of over 70 years for justice, dignity and self-determination, is in their final stage leading to freedom.

    “We stand for justice and dignity of all human beings and share with you words of the Holy Qur’an, which states:

    “O Believers! Be steadfast in standing firm for Allah, witnesses in justice; and do not let the hatred of a people prevent you from being just. But be just – that is nearer to righteousness. And fear Allah; indeed, Allah is acquainted with what you do.” [Surah al Maa’idah: 8]

    We pray that you will take heed and stop the injustice you are inflicting upon the Kashmiri people and other minorities within India.”

    https://5pillarsuk.com/2020/02/07/mo...hmir-lockdown/

  6. #84
    Junon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    UK
    Gender
    Male
    Religion
    Islam
    Posts
    3,454
    Threads
    319
    Reputation
    5935
    Rep Power
    71
    Likes (Given)
    459
    Likes (Received)
    525

    Re: It looks like Imran Khan is about to become Pakistan's prime minister

    Salaam

    Another update.



    OPINION - Saudis follow Iran’s 1994 somersault on Kashmir at OIC

    In a case of role reversal, after receiving Indian assurance, Iran withdrew support to OIC resolution on Kashmir in 1994


    Is Saudi Arabia playing with Pakistan on the issue of Jammu and Kashmir, in a similar way as Iran acted previously in 1994?

    Diplomatic sources in Pakistan say that Saudi Arabia has shown reluctance to accept Islamabad’s request for an immediate meeting of the foreign ministers of the 57-member Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC).

    While speaking at a think-tank in Malaysia, Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan voiced frustration over the OIC’s silence on Kashmir. He said: “The reason is that we have no voice and there is a total division amongst [us]. We can’t even come together as a whole on the OIC meeting on Kashmir.”

    Cut to March 1994. On a winter morning, with the Alborz Mountains overlooking Tehran airport were still under snow, braving cold winds, a special Indian military plane touched down. Onboard was then ailing External Affairs Minister Dinesh Singh, along with three others. Barely able to walk, Singh had been dragged out of a hospital bed by then-Prime Minister Pamulaparthi Venkata Narasimha Rao to deliver a personal and a secret letter to Iranian President Ali Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani.

    Having mortgaged its gold reserves in 1992, India was on the economic brink and its old friend Russia was still licking its wounds after the break-up of the Soviet Union. The OIC was pushing a resolution at the Office of the UN Commissioner on Human Rights (OHCHR), later rechristened as Human Rights Council, to condemn India for human rights violations in Kashmir. The resolution, in case of approval, was to be referred to the UN Security Council for initiating economic sanctions and other punitive measures against India. The decisions in the OIC are adopted by consensus.

    Recalling how India was saved from disgrace, former Indian career diplomat M K Bhadrakumar believes that Rao had shrewdly prevailed upon Iran to abstain from voting.

    “Once there is no consensus in the OIC, the resolution was bound to fall through,” said Bhadrakumar, who has served as India’s envoy in Iran, Afghanistan, and Turkey.

    The Iranians had no clue to the Indian minister’s mission. Casting aside protocol, Iranian Foreign Minister Ali Akbar Velayati was at the airport when Singh alighted. Velayati asked what on earth could be of such momentous importance for Singh to risk a perilous journey in his precarious condition. In reply, Dinesh Singh smilingly handed over a demarche.

    In the day, he went through his “Kashmir brief” diligently in meetings with his Iranian interlocutors, namely, Velayati, President Hashemi Rafsanjani and Iranian Majlis Speaker Nateq Nouri. By evening, Singh returned to his hospital bed in New Delhi, but with an assurance from President Rafsanjani to Prime Minister Rao “that Iran will do all it can to ensure that no harm comes to India.”

    Iran killed OIC resolution

    Only after 72 anxious hours did New Delhi learn that Iran had killed the OIC move to table the resolution. This marked a new chapter in India-Iran relations with wider consequences. Iran distanced itself from Pakistan in the matter of Afghanistan; and, India joined hands with Iran to promote the Northern Alliance, which was inimical to Pakistani interests.

    Pakistan was shocked by what it termed as “backstabbing”. What Iran gained is a mystery? But events show that Rao had promised to grant a kind of self-rule and to give Pakistan access in the affairs and progress of Jammu and Kashmir. A year later, Rao while attending the Non-Aligned Movement summit in the West African country of Burkina Faso declared that the sky is the limit concerning the quantum of autonomy to Jammu and Kashmir. He also envisaged a gas pipeline from Iran via Pakistan calling it a peace pipeline.

    The Indian delegation to the OHCHR led by leader of the opposition Atal Behari Vajpayee comprised Minister of State for External Affairs Salman Khurshid and former Chief Minister of Jammu and Kashmir Farooq Abdullah, now detained under the stringent Public Safety Act. Basking in this diplomatic victory, Vajpayee and Abdullah were unaware that, three days ago, Dinesh Singh had laid the ground for it in Tehran. Rao also never tried to steal the credit from them. Abdullah later said he had joined Indian delegation, after receiving a promise from the prime minister that the pre-1953 constitutional status will be restored that envisaged greater self-rule and opening of Line of Control -- a de facto border that divides the Kashmir valley between Pakistan and India -- with Pakistan-administered Kashmir.

    Much later, it came to be known that when the Pakistani ambassador supported by Saudi envoy sought to move the OIC resolution, the Iranian diplomat in Geneva, under orders from Tehran, backed out. He argued that as a close friend of both India and Pakistan, Iran was ready to sort out their problems and there was no need to raise these at an international forum. That was the last time Pakistan tried to get a resolution on the Kashmir issue tabled in a UN forum.

    Full circle, roles reversed

    Now, the wheel has come full circle. 26 years later, while Iran has returned to supporting Pakistan on Kashmir, backing from Riyadh has dried up. In a role reversal, over the past few days, reports said Saudi Arabia has made several proposals to Pakistan to avoid the meeting of foreign ministers including holding a parliamentary forum or speakers’ conference from Muslim countries. Islamabad’s position has been that speakers’ meeting is not commensurate with the seriousness of the situation in Kashmir. Pakistan also fears that parliamentary meeting will be used for Iran bashing as Speaker of Saudi Shura Abdullah bin Mohammed bin Ibrahim al Sheikh had undertaken to lobby in this regard.

    According to Amir Rana, a Pakistani strategic expert, Pakistan’s geo-economic and strategic challenges make it difficult for the country to fully cooperate or annoy either of the two blocs. “Pakistan is caught in a dilemma where its heart is in the Malaysian-Turkish bloc, which has been openly supporting Pakistan’s Kashmir cause, but its mind is with the Saudi-led bloc, which has money and political influence that Pakistan needs for its struggling economy,” he said.

    Kashmir remains a core Pakistani foreign policy objective and, thus, an easy way to win the country’s goodwill. But this is not enough for sustaining geo-economic and strategic interests. The diplomatic posture of a nation becomes more balanced and comprehensive when architects of its foreign policy have diverse economic, socio-cultural and political determinants insight. Indeed, there is a lot for Pakistan to ponder over when it sees some of its close friends not supporting it on Kashmir.

    But the international community, in general, has shown its anxiety about gross human rights violations being committed in India-held Kashmir. Apart from human rights groups and international media, different forums have also been showing concern. It would increase pressure on India but this is not going to translate into support for the implementation of the UN resolutions on Kashmir. It is a real challenge for Pakistan’s diplomacy to cultivate such support within the divided blocs of the Muslim world.

    https://www.aa.com.tr/en/analysis/op...at-oic/1730770

  7. Report bad ads?
  8. #85
    Junon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    UK
    Gender
    Male
    Religion
    Islam
    Posts
    3,454
    Threads
    319
    Reputation
    5935
    Rep Power
    71
    Likes (Given)
    459
    Likes (Received)
    525

    Re: It looks like Imran Khan is about to become Pakistan's prime minister

    Salaam

    Another update

    Israel is playing a big role in India’s escalating conflict with Pakistan

    Signing up to the ‘war on terror’ – especially ‘Islamist terror’ – may seem natural for two states built on colonial partition whose security is threatened by Muslim neighbours


    When I heard the first news report, I assumed it was an Israeli air raid on Gaza. Or Syria. Airstrikes on a “terrorist camp” were the first words. A “command and control centre” destroyed, many “terrorists” killed. The military was retaliating for a “terrorist attack” on its troops, we were told.

    An Islamist “jihadi” base had been eliminated. Then I heard the name Balakot and realised that it was neither in Gaza, nor in Syria – not even in Lebanon – but in Pakistan. Strange thing, that. How could anyone mix up Israel and India?

    Well, don’t let the idea fade away. Two thousand five hundred miles separate the Israeli ministry of defence in Tel Aviv from the Indian ministry of defence in New Delhi, but there’s a reason why the usual cliche-stricken agency dispatches sound so similar.

    For months, Israel has been assiduously lining itself up alongside India’s nationalist BJP government in an unspoken – and politically dangerous – “anti-Islamist” coalition, an unofficial, unacknowledged alliance, while India itself has now become the largest weapons market for the Israeli arms trade.

    Not by chance, therefore, has the Indian press just trumpeted the fact that Israeli-made Rafael Spice-2000 “smart bombs” were used by the Indian air force in its strike against Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM) “terrorists” inside Pakistan.

    Like many Israeli boasts of hitting similar targets, the Indian adventure into Pakistan might owe more to the imagination than military success. The “300-400 terrorists” supposedly eliminated by the Israeli-manufactured and Israeli-supplied GPS-guided bombs may turn out to be little more than rocks and trees.

    But there was nothing unreal about the savage ambush of Indian troops in Kashmir on 14 February which the JeM claimed, and which left 40 Indian soldiers dead. Nor the shooting down of at least one Indian jet this week.

    India was Israel’s largest arms client in 2017, paying £530m for Israeli air defence, radar systems and ammunition, including air-to-ground missiles – most of them tested during Israel’s military offensives against Palestinians and targets in Syria.

    Israel itself is trying to explain away its continued sales of tanks, weapons and boats to the Myanmar military dictatorship – while western nations impose sanctions on the government which has attempted to destroy its minority and largely Muslim Rohingya people. But Israel’s arms trade with India is legal, above-board and much advertised by both sides.

    The Israelis have filmed joint exercises between their own “special commando” units and those sent by India to be trained in the Negev desert, again with all the expertise supposedly learned by Israel in Gaza and other civilian-thronged battlefronts.

    At least 16 Indian “Garud” commandos – part of a 45-strong Indian military delegation – were for a time based at the Nevatim and Palmachim air bases in Israel. In his first visit to India last year – preceded by a trip to Israel by nationalist Indian prime minister Narendra Modi, Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu recalled the 2008 Islamist attacks on Mumbai in which almost 170 civilians were killed. “Indians and Israelis know too well the pain of terrorist attacks,” he told Modi. “We remember the horrific savagery of Mumbai. We grit our teeth, we fight back, we never give in.” This was also BJP-speak.

    Several Indian commentators, however, have warned that right-wing Zionism and right-wing nationalism under Modi should not become the foundation stone of the relationship between the two countries, both of which – in rather different ways – fought the British empire.

    Brussels researcher Shairee Malhotra, whose work has appeared in the Israeli newspaper Haaretz, has pointed out that India has the world’s third largest Muslim population after Indonesia and Pakistan – upward of 180 million people. “The India-Israel relationship is also commonly being framed in terms of a natural convergence of ideas between their ruling BJP and Likud parties,” she wrote last year.

    Hindu nationalists had constructed “a narrative of Hindus as historically victims at the hands of Muslims”, an attractive idea to those Hindus who recall partition and the continuing turbulent relationship with Pakistan.

    In fact, as Malhotra pointed out in Haaretz, “Israel’s biggest fans in India appear to be the ‘internet Hindus’ who primarily love Israel for how it deals with Palestine and fights Muslims.”

    Malhotra has condemned Carleton University professor Vivek Dehejia for demanding a “tripartite” alliance between India, Israel and the US – since they have all suffered “from the scourge of Islamic terrorism”.

    In fact, by the end of 2016, only 23 men from India had left to fight for Isis in the Arab world, although Belgium, with a population of only half a million Muslims, produced nearly 500 fighters.

    Malhotra’s argument is that the Indian-Israeli relationship should be pragmatic rather than ideological.

    But it is difficult to see how Zionist nationalism will not leach into Hindu nationalism when Israel is supplying so many weapons to India – the latest of which India, which has enjoyed diplomatic relations with Israel since 1992, has already used against Islamists inside Pakistan.

    Signing up to the “war on terror” – especially “Islamist terror” – may seem natural for two states built on colonial partition whose security is threatened by Muslim neighbours.

    In both cases, their struggle is over the right to own or occupy territory. Israel, India and Pakistan all possess nuclear weapons. Another good reason not to let Palestine and Kashmir get tangled up together. And to leave India’s 180 million Muslims alone.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/voices...-a8800076.html

  9. #86
    Junon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    UK
    Gender
    Male
    Religion
    Islam
    Posts
    3,454
    Threads
    319
    Reputation
    5935
    Rep Power
    71
    Likes (Given)
    459
    Likes (Received)
    525

    Re: It looks like Imran Khan is about to become Pakistan's prime minister

    Salaam

    Another update

    Keir Starmer moves Labour closer to India over Kashmir

    Keir Starmer has moved Labour closer to India on the issue of the Kashmir after meeting with an India lobby group this morning.

    Following his meeting with Labour Friends of India (LFIN) Starmer said the conflict was a “bilateral issue for India and Pakistan.”

    At Labour’s 2019 conference, Labour delegates passed a motion criticising the actions of India in the Kashmiri conflict, and said Kashmiris should have self-determination.
    The policy motion approved by the conference also called for international monitors to be admitted to the region.

    Ex Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn had also made his views clear, tweeting in August 2019: “The situation in Kashmir is deeply disturbing. Human rights abuses taking place are unacceptable. The rights of the Kashmiri people must be respected and UN resolutions implemented.”

    But following his meeting with Labour Friends of India, the new Labour leader said: “We must not allow issues of the sub-continent to divide communities here. Any constitutional issues in India are a matter for the Indian Parliament, and Kashmir is a bilateral issue for India and Pakistan to resolve peacefully. Labour is an internationalist party and stands for the defence of human rights everywhere.”

    Pledging to promote UK-India ties, Starmer added: “A Labour government under my leadership will be determined to build even stronger business links with India and to co-operate on the global stage on issues such as climate change.

    “I look forward to meeting the Indian High Commissioner in due course to open a renewed dialogue between the Labour Party and the people of India.”

    Meanwhile, Rajesh Agrawal, LFIN co-chair, said: “I really welcome his commitment to rebuilding strong links between the Labour Party and the Indian community. This has been a great start and Keir has achieved a lot in the short span of couple of weeks. Labour Friends of India will work closely with him and will continue to promote UK-India ties as well as continuing to raise any issues from the community to the leadership.”

    While pro-India groups had strained relations with Labour in the Corbyn era, they seem happy with the direction of the new Labour leadership.

    However, Starmer’s comments on the Kashmiri conflict will be divisive among party members, and particularly controversial on the party’s Left. The Labour Party also has several MPs of Kashmiri heritage.

    Kashmir has been placed under a security lockdown since last August when India’s Hindu nationalist government stripped the Muslim-majority Himalayan region’s limited autonomy. Low-speed internet was revived in March after more than six months of communication blackout.

    India and Pakistan claim divided Kashmir in its entirety. Most Kashmiris support the rebel cause that the territory be united either under Pakistani rule or as an independent country while also participating in civilian street protests against Indian rule.

    Rebels have been fighting Indian control since 1989. India accuses Pakistan of arming and training the rebels, a charge Pakistan denies. Nearly 70,000 people have been killed in the uprising and the ensuing Indian military crackdown.

    https://5pillarsuk.com/2020/04/30/ke...-over-kashmir/


  10. Hide
Page 5 of 5 First ... 3 4 5
Hey there! It looks like Imran Khan is about to become Pakistan's prime minister Looks like you're enjoying the discussion, but you're not signed up for an account.

When you create an account, we remember exactly what you've read, so you always come right back where you left off. You also get notifications, here and via email, whenever new posts are made. And you can like posts and share your thoughts. It looks like Imran Khan is about to become Pakistan's prime minister
Sign Up

Similar Threads

  1. If you were Prime Minister
    By JohnnyEnglish in forum World Affairs
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 09-30-2015, 05:04 PM
  2. New British Prime Minister is Jewish !!
    By Nirvana in forum World Affairs
    Replies: 49
    Last Post: 05-20-2010, 01:40 PM
  3. HARDTALK with ex Malaysian prime minister
    By aadil77 in forum World Affairs
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-25-2008, 10:15 PM
  4. If you was Prime Minister...
    By England in forum General
    Replies: 71
    Last Post: 02-09-2007, 05:07 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
create