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  1. #1
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    Missing Saudi journalist's fiancee asks for Trump's help (OP)


    https://www.yahoo.com/news/missing-s...035124244.html


    World
    Missing Saudi journalist's fiancee asks for Trump's help
    AFP AFP 11 hours ago
    Hatice Cengiz says her missing fiance Jamal Khashoggi did not doubt his safety inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul (AFP Photo/OZAN KOSE)
    Washington (AFP) - The fiancee of missing Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi on Tuesday asked President Donald Trump to help uncover what happened to the Riyadh critic who she said had "been fighting for his principles".


    Hatice Cengiz made the appeal in an opinion piece for The Washington Post newspaper, where Khashoggi was a columnist and an outspoken critic of some of Riyadh's policies.


    A veteran journalist, Khashoggi disappeared on October 2 after entering Saudi Arabia's consulate in Istanbul to arrange paperwork for his wedding to Cengiz, a Turk.


    Government sources in Turkey said police believe the 59-year-old was killed inside the consulate, claims which Riyadh dismissed as "baseless".


    Cengiz wrote that she was "confident in the abilities of Turkish government officials."


    "At this time, I implore President Trump and first lady Melania Trump to help shed light on Jamal's disappearance," she said.


    "I also urge Saudi Arabia, especially King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, to show the same level of sensitivity and release CCTV footage from the consulate," Cengiz wrote.


    Trump on Monday expressed concern about Khashoggi's case and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo called for a thorough investigation.


    Turkish police were also looking into the possibility that Khashoggi was kidnapped, local media reported.


    Riyadh has said Khashoggi left the consulate after his visit.


    Although Khashoggi knew that his opinions had angered certain people, he entered the consulate "without doubting he would be safe there," his fiancee wrote, but after three hours of waiting "fear and concern" overcame her.


    Khashoggi had fled his homeland in September last year and had been living in self-imposed exile in the United States, where he had applied for US citizenship, Cengiz said.


    A former Saudi government advisor, Khashoggi has been openly critical of Prince Mohammed, accusing him of introducing a new era of "fear, intimidation, arrests and public shaming."


    Cengiz wrote she remains confident that the "great man" is still alive, "although my hope slowly fades away each passing day."

  2. #21
    Junon's Avatar
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    Re: Missing Saudi journalist's fiancee asks for Trump's help

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    Salaam

    Looks like 'MBS' new best friend 'Bibi' is going to come to his rescue.

    Blurb

    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Jamal Khashoggi's murder must not risk Saudi Arabia's "stability"

    Last edited by Junon; 1 Week Ago at 11:35 PM.

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  4. #22
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    Re: Missing Saudi journalist's fiancee asks for Trump's help

    Salaam

    Another update

    Some Saudis want to boycott Amazon in response to The Washington Post's coverage of Jamal Khashoggi's murder

    • Saudis are calling for a boycott of Amazon and its regional subsidiary, Souq.com, in response to The Washington Post's coverage of journalist Jamal Khashoggi's murder.
    • Thousands of people on Twitter in Saudi Arabia echoed those calls for a boycott in order to jab Jeff Bezos, who owns The Post and is the founder and biggest shareholder in Amazon.
    • People were apparently angry about The Post's ongoing coverage of Khashoggi's murder, viewing it as an attack on the kingdom.


    Saudis are calling for a boycott of Amazon and its regional subsidiary, Souq.com, in response to The Washington Post's coverage of journalist Jamal Khashoggi's murder.

    Thousands of people on Twitter in Saudi Arabia echoed those calls for a boycott in order to jab Jeff Bezos, who owns The Post and is the founder and biggest shareholder in Amazon.

    Khashoggi, who was murdered in the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey, last month, was a columnist at The Post.

    "Boycott Amazon" was the top trending hashtag on Twitter in Saudi Arabia for several hours Sunday, according to Bloomberg.

    Users appeared to be angry at The Post's ongoing coverage of Khashoggi's murder, viewing it as an attack on their kingdom's policies.

    Many were notably upset by a recent op-ed from Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who blasted Saudi officials for trying to "cover up" Khashoggi's killing.

    The Post's editorial board has repeatedly called for transparency in the investigations surrounding Khashoggi's October death and has published gruesome details about the murder citing information from Turkish officials.

    While Saudi Arabia’s description of what happened to the 59-year-old has shifted several times, Turkish authorities said he was strangled shortly after he entered the consulate and his body was dismembered. The Post previously reported that Turkish officials were pursuing a theory that Khashoggi’s remains were dissolved in acid in the consulate or at the nearby consul general’s home.

    His remains have not been recovered.

    Saudi users shared videos and photos of themselves deleting the Amazon and Souq applications from their phones.

    Some also posted about canceling their Amazon or Souq accounts. Influential users referred to Western media coverage of Khashoggi's case as a "media war," Bloomberg reported, while other tweets appeared to be automated or copied and pasted.

    Some users mocked the boycott campaign against Amazon, which recently became the second US company to achieve a $1 trillion market cap.

    The Post cited an anonymous Turkish official as saying authorities found biological evidence in the consulate garden that supported the theory.

    “Khashoggi’s body was not in need of burying,” the official said, according to The Post.

    Earlier theories floated that Khashoggi’s body was wrapped up in some kind of fabric and given to a local Turkish coconspirator.

    http://uk.businessinsider.com/saudis-to-boycott-amazon-over-washington-post-jamal-khashoggi-coverage-2018-11

  5. #23
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    Re: Missing Saudi journalist's fiancee asks for Trump's help

    No body cares about this guy how about the kids in Iraq, Syria and Burma killed daily, I'd like to see this much attention for the Iraqi boy run over by a tank by Hezbollah thugs on video for their entertainment then I would ever care to hear about this guy. I want to know which Rafidi Mobilization Gangsters were responsible and I would like for Iran to be questioned on an international scale for it as well as the fake government of Iraq and I would like for BBC, Al-Jazeera and the rest of the media circus to give attention to him, until then no one needs to hear about this man he is unimportant and insignificant.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Junon View Post
    Salaam

    Looks like 'MBS' new best friend 'Bibi' is going to come to his rescue.

    Blurb

    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Jamal Khashoggi's murder must not risk Saudi Arabia's "stability"

    Better than Khamenei the scum of the Majoos or Bashar the dog of the Rafida
    https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-...-iraqi-9261323
    Last edited by JustTime; 1 Week Ago at 01:24 AM.
    Missing Saudi journalist's fiancee asks for Trump's help


    يا قافلة الخير
    "The Persian aggression against Iraq was a result of the arrogant, racialist and evil attitudes of the ruling clique in Iran."
    -Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid at-Tikriti -
    العراق جمجمة العرب ورمح الله في الأرض



  6. #24
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    Re: Missing Saudi journalist's fiancee asks for Trump's help

    Salaam

    Oh dear seems the Oligarchs are displeased with MBS

    Crown Prince’s wings clipped as Khashoggi death rattles Riyadh

    Fallout from killing has weakened Prince Mohammed and given second wind to old guard of elders

    Six weeks after Jamal Khashoggi was murdered by Saudi agents, the decision-making process in Riyadh is slowly starting to change. Fallout from the assassination in Istanbul has wounded Mohammed bin Salman, the heir to the throne, and given a second wind to an old guard of elders, whose views are once more being heard.

    Publicly, the kingdom’s leaders appear chastened and contrite in the wake of Khashoggi’s gruesome killing inside the Saudi consulate. In private though, senior members of the House of Saud, including the crown prince, are partly blaming Turkey for the global revulsion, which they say could have been contained if Ankara had played by “regional rules”.

    Central to the resentment, according to sources close to the royal court in Riyadh, is a view that the Turkish president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, betrayed the kingdom by disclosing details of the investigation and refusing all overtures from Saudi envoys, including an offer to pay “significant” compensation.

    “They say they were betrayed by the Turks,” a regional source said. “That’s where they are in their most private thoughts.”

    The extraordinary ramifications of Khashoggi’s death continue to reverberate through the halls of power in Riyadh, where some decisions are now being made away from the ubiquitous crown prince, who Turkey alleges directly ordered the assassination, and has since tried to deflect blame to fall guys, including his most prominent domestic aide. Ankara has been aiming to isolate Prince Mohammed through weeks of pointed rhetoric that has appealed to the Saudi king to rein in his son, and restore more conventional ways of doing business.

    The return to Riyadh earlier this month of Ahmed bin Abdulaziz, the sole surviving full brother of King Salman, has been widely interpreted as a first step in the restoration of an old order, in which decision making was made after extensive consultation among elders. Another senior figure, Khalid al-Faisal, led the Saudi delegation to meet Erdoğan in October, and the king himself - who has taken more of a chairman role since appointing Prince Mohammed as his heir - has been more visible and vocal in meetings, a second senior source says.

    “MbS [the common acronym for the crown prince] has had his wings clipped,” the source said. “There’s no doubt about it. He doesn’t have the same swagger, and he’s just as scared of a mis-step as the next guy. That’s a big change.”

    In the days after Khashoggi was killed, as the official Saudi reaction shifted from outright denial that it had played a role, to a begrudging admission that Khashoggi had been killed in a fight, Prince Mohammed struggled to comprehend the scale of the reaction – and even the reason for it.

    “He was blaming the Americans for betraying him initially,” said the regional source. “He’d seen Abu Ghraib, renditions, death penalties, and he felt comforted by Trump. He could not understand why this was happening to him.”

    Since then, western leaders’ once enthusiastic embrace of Prince Mohammed has been replaced by wariness and a view that some of the regional feuds launched in his name need to be brought to an end.

    “We saw [the US secretary of state Mike] Pompeo talk strongly about Yemen,” said a British diplomat, who like other senior officials contacted by the Guardian, declined to be named. “That was not a ‘we’re working with you’ tone. It was something very different.”

    Pompeo on 31 October had demanded a 30-day ceasefire in Yemen, where Saudi-led forces had been fighting Houthi rebel groups, who it alleges are backed by Iran. The US defence secretary, James Mattis, added his voice on Friday, and urged the start of peace talks between Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Iran.

    They were the strongest remarks yet by a US official in the two-year war on the kingdom’s eastern border. Also on Friday, the US said it would no longer refuel Saudi fighter jets conducting missions in Yemen – a further sign that Riyadh’s most important ally, and supplier of most of its weapons, is losing faith in the campaign.

    The Saudi-led blockade of Qatar is also facing renewed scrutiny, with US officials believed to be newly energised in finding ways to force a climbdown which would not further diminish Prince Mohammed in the eyes of his critics or domestic stakeholders.

    There is little appetite in London or Washington for Prince Mohammed to be removed, and Ankara – which is strongly opposed to the crown prince, but not at odds with King Salman – is being lobbied heavily by Riyadh’s allies to accept the fact that Prince Mohammed will not be ousted.

    A Whitehall assessment is that a risk exists of a slide back towards the religious establishment, revocation of social change and a plunge in the Saudi economy if a palace coup was launched. “It’s in everyone’s interests to find a way forward that world leaders can just about live with,” an official with responsibility for Saudi security policy said.

    Erdoğan is understood to remain unconvinced about Prince Mohammed remaining in power. On Saturday, the Turkish leader claimed Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Britain, France and Germany had been given audio tapes that recorded the killing of Khashoggi by a team of 15 security officials who had flown to Istanbul and waited for him to enter the Saudi consulate to sign marriage papers on 2 October. Canada’s prime minister, Justin Trudeau, confirmed Canadian spies had listened to audio depicting the last moments of Khashoggi’s life. Germany later followed suit, in what appeared to be a co-ordinated effort to maintain pressure on Riyadh.

    What was recorded on the tapes remains the centrepiece of the case against the kingdom, and could help answer whether the crown prince himself was incriminated in the conversations. His chief domestic aide, Saad al-Qahtani, was sacked two weeks after the assassination, as was a deputy intelligence chief. Mohammed bin Salman insists he played no role and his defenders have insisted the hitmen over-reached in a bid to please their masters. Intelligence officials in the region and in Europe remain incredulous at the claim.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/nov/12/saudi-arabia-crown-prince-mohammed-wings-clipped-as-khashoggi-death-rattles-riyadh

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  8. #25
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    Re: Missing Saudi journalist's fiancee asks for Trump's help

    Salaam

    Another update

    Letter from Riyadh

    We all grieve for our brother Jamal Khashoggi, may be peace be upon him. Indeed, may peace be upon all the pieces of him, wherever they may be interred.


    Our own exhaustive inquiry into this affair has concluded that our government may have accidentally killed Jamal on purpose. According to our evolving PR strategy, he appears to have died while resisting torture and extra judicial beheading, itself a serious offence punishable by torture and beheading.

    Alas, we cannot help our Turkish cousins locate the remains of our dear brother. It appears they may well have been mislaid in all the excitement. Infidels have accused our loveable crown prince, Muhammed bin Salman, aka ‘MBS’, may Allah preserve His Royal Highness. But the real culpability seems to lie elsewhere.

    You westerners have overlooked the role of our dear sheikh, His Excellency Saud al-Qahtani, who has been accused of overseeing the whole of this most unfortunate incident. Although not physically present in Istanbul, al-Qahtani was beamed into the interrogation room via skype to hurl insults at Khashoggi. Indeed, it is al-Qahtani who appears on the Turks secret recordings inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul – clearly taking a keen interest in Jamal’s ‘cross examination’. At one point he was heard to shout: ‘Bring me the head of the dog’.

    Al Qahtani may appear to be a pudgy, unprepossessing sheikh of some 40 years with spaghetti western designer stubble, but he was widely considered to be the dark power behind MBS, Saudi officials familiar with his ‘methods’ have quietly tried to brief western journalists and diplomats about this shadowy figure – unkindly dubbed ‘the Goebbels of the sands’. The Sheikh has been at the heart of most of our recent scandals and fiascos.

    A law graduate, His Excellency first came to notice in 2003 as a legal adviser to our departed brother, His Majesty King Abdullah bin Abulaziz. But his career really took of in 2012 when he became court adviser and soon came to the attention of MBS. Nominally al-Qathani ran the crown princes social media sites, quickly gathering some 1.3 million personal followers and legions of bots which he has mercilessly deployed against the Qatari dogs. Al-Qahtani rapidly became invaluable in a whole series of initiatives carried out at the behest of MBS.

    These included the so-called ‘Great Sheikh-down’ of late 2017 when more than 200 of our most corrupt prices and sheikhs were incarcerated in the Ritz Carlton here in Riyadh. Al-Qathani led several of the ‘interrogations’ himself and played a key role in relieving many of the inmates of their ill-gotten gains. He also helped out in the kidnapping of the Lebanese prime minster Saad Hariri, who we felt had failed to stand up to the Shite infidels of Iran and Hezbollah.

    Al-Qahtani oversaw the interrogation and thrashing of Hariri, whom he then forced to sign a letter of resignation. The intercession of French President Emmanuel Macron made it clear there had been a regrettable misunderstanding and our brother Harari was soon released to continue being prime minster.

    Following the latest, ahem, regrettable incident in Istanbul, it seems our rulers have decided that al-Qahtani has delighted them long enough. King Salman has ‘let go’ him and four other officials over the Khashoggi affair, leaving our dear and greatly respected crown prince MBS looking as serene as ever.

    Private Eye Issue 1483

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    Re: Missing Saudi journalist's fiancee asks for Trump's help

    Salaam

    Another update.

    What Turkey Stands to Gain From the Khashoggi Investigation

    President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan might not be able to permanently sideline the Saudi crown prince, but he could extract other concessions that bolster his own position.


    Saudi authorities said Thursday that they charged 11 people in connection with the killing of Jamal Khashoggi. Five of the 11 were charged with murder. Turkey’s response? It’s not enough.

    The journalist’s killing has cast Turkey, which under President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has stifled dissent, in an unusual role—that of a defender of human rights and a free press. So what does Turkey hope to get out of this? Two main things: the undermining of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and an end to the Riyadh-led blockade of Qatar.

    Since Khashoggi disappeared last month, Erdoğan has put on a masterful performance: He has ensured that the specter of culpability for the killing looms over MbS; maintained deference toward Saudi King Salman, MbS’s father; and reset relations with President Donald Trump through the release of a jailed American pastor.

    The Saudi prosecutors’ narrative could diminish some of Turkey’s pressure on the crown prince. According to the version of events they laid out on Thursday, a 15-man team sent to the Saudi consulate in Istanbul had orders to return Khashoggi to the kingdom. But he resisted, resulting in his murder and dismemberment, the prosecutors said. This action, they said, was not authorized by top Saudi officials. The version of events contradicts almost every previous account offered by the Saudis, who had said the death was accidental. But it is also at odds with the Turkish narrative that Khashoggi’s killing on October 2 was premeditated.

    “We find all those steps positive, but insufficient,” Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu said Thursday following the Saudi announcement. That pronouncement is hardly shocking, but there is irony in Turkey assuming the role of champion of press freedom and human rights. This week, a Turkish court dismissed the case against Ayla Albayrak, a former Wall Street Journal reporter who had previously been accused of promoting terrorist propaganda. More than two-dozen journalists have been jailed by the Turkish government.*

    Under Erdoğan, the government has crushed dissent and dismantled the free press. Yet on the Khashoggi case, it has emerged as the clearest voice for justice—clearer even than the West, which traditionally has championed such causes but in this case is standing by its ally MbS. The Trump administration announced economic sanctions on 17 Saudis with alleged links to the killing shortly after the Saudi announcement. A French foreign-ministry spokeswoman called the Saudi announcement a step “in the right direction.”

    Following Thursday’s charges, Erdoğan’s primary goal of sidelining MbS appears to have stalled. “I think he overplayed his hand aiming to undermine MbS,” Soner Cagaptay, who studies Turkey at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, said.

    Still, the Turkish president has cards left to play: Saudi Arabia’s Western allies are so keen on the Khashoggi story going away that they are likely to offer Ankara incentives to stop pointing the finger at MbS and accept the results of the Saudi inquiry. (Turkey itself has called for an international investigation into the incident.)

    Ankara can also extract major political concessions from the Arabs. Erdoğan, who has portrayed himself as a leader of the Muslim world, has another goal: that of Islamic unity. “If he gets this as part of the bargain with MbS, he might let him walk away,” Cagaptay, the author of The New Sultan: Erdoğan and the Crisis of Modern Turkey, said.

    One way to achieve that unity is through an end to the Saudi-led Arab blockade of Qatar. Turkey, along with Iran, has supported Doha during the more-than-year-long embargo imposed on Qatar by its fellow Arab states for, among other things, its alleged support of Islamist groups. Many of those groups are linked to the Muslim Brotherhood, which most Arab states regard as a terrorist organization, but which Erdoğan openly supports because of its espousal of political Islam. Qatar, which remains one of Turkey’s major financial benefactors, says it supports all groups in the region because it takes into account political realities on the ground.

    Foreign Minister Çavuşoğlu’s remarks that the Saudi prosecutor’s actions were “positive, but insufficient” leaves the door open for a compromise—one that ends the blockade of Qatar and includes a tacit understanding from Arab states that Ankara will continue to support groups like the Muslim Brotherhood and its allies. Any such agreement would almost certainly boost Erdoğan’s standing in the region. For a country that is struggling economically and, until recently, was feuding with all its major allies, this is no small thing.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/internat...salman/575962/

    More analysis.

    Blurb

    Press TV interviews E. Michael Jones, editor of Culture Wars magazine, on the implications of the U.S. indication it will hold accountable those involved in the Khashoggi murder.

    Last edited by Junon; 1 Day Ago at 12:08 AM.

  10. #27
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    Re: Missing Saudi journalist's fiancee asks for Trump's help

    The CIA came out this morning and said they believed the Crown Prince ordered Khashoggi's killing

    That is VERY unusual for them to do --directly implicating a US ally before statements from the president.

    This is going to get very ugly ....

  11. #28
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    Re: Missing Saudi journalist's fiancee asks for Trump's help

    Salaam

    As horrible as this murder is (and it is) usually an incident like this would be hushed up. (Erdogan himself locks up dissidents and look whats happening to Julian Assange). Also note the lack of concern for the lives lost in Yemen, Syria and Ive heard another Saudi journalist died that didn't make the headlines.

    Usually Western powers quick to defend or at least deflect criticism directed towards the Sauds.

    Hmmmm theres something else going on.

    Edit:

    Interesting speculation.







    Last edited by Junon; 9 Hours Ago at 06:40 AM.

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