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    CuriousonTruth's Avatar
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    Mohammad Morsi has passed away

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    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2019/...155322012.html

    May Allah forgive his shortcomings and accept his martyrdom.

    Egypt's former President Mohamed Morsi has died after appearing in court in Cairo, according to state media.
    The 67-year-old died after fainting during the court session in the Egyptian capital on Monday, state TV reported.
    "He was speaking before the judge for 20 minutes then became very animated and fainted. He was quickly rushed to the hospital where he later died," a judicial source said.

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    Abz2000's Avatar
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    Re: Mohammad Morsi has passed away

    Innaa li Allaahi wa innaa ilaihi raaji'oon

    May Allah's curse be upon those who unjustly harm the believing Muslim men and women and do not repent, and also upon those who take the lead role from behind the scenes.
    Mohammad Morsi has passed away













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    Ahmed.'s Avatar
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    Re: Mohammad Morsi has passed away

    Inna lillahi wa inna ilayhi raji'un

    May Allah(SWT) grant him maghfirah, illuminate his grave, and enter him into Jannat-ul-Firdaus. Ameen ya Rabbil 'alamin.

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    Re: Mohammad Morsi has passed away

    May Allah have mercy on us all, Ameen!
    Mohammad Morsi has passed away


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    Junon's Avatar
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    Re: Mohammad Morsi has passed away

    Salaam

    May Allah have mercy on his soul. To confirm what has happened.

    Blurb

    Egypt's former President Mohamed Morsi has died after appearing in court in Cairo, according to state media. The 67-year-old died after fainting during the court session in the Egyptian capital on Monday, state TV reported. "He was speaking before the judge for 20 minutes then became very animated and fainted.

    He was quickly rushed to the hospital where he later died," a judicial source said. Morsi became Egypt's first democratically elected president in 2012, one year after the Arab Spring uprising saw the end of President Hosni Mubarak's 30-year rule.


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    anatolian's Avatar
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    Re: Mohammad Morsi has passed away

    May Allah forgive his sins and accept him in His heaven. He left people a light.
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    Mohammad Morsi has passed away

    “Either seem as you are or be as you seem” Rumi

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    Saira Khan's Avatar
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    Re: Mohammad Morsi has passed away

    May Allah SWT accept his struggles against the cruels.
    May Allah shower his curse on those who illegitimately overthrew his just and Islamic regime.

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    Junon's Avatar
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    Re: Mohammad Morsi has passed away

    Salaam

    Reaction to his death.



















    BBC being the BBC.





    President Erdogan reacts quickly.







    The Clown princes, Sisi and western powers are no doubt pleased.









    Blurb

    The death of Egypt’s first democratically elected president, Mohamed Morsi, has attracted widespread media coverage. But Egyptian media have been spreading misinformation about his death and the medical care he received in prison.



    Finally.





    Last edited by Junon; 06-20-2019 at 09:41 PM.

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    Junon's Avatar
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    Re: Mohammad Morsi has passed away

    Salaam

    Another update


    Mohamed Morsi buried as detention conditions denounced as torture

    Egyptian former president’s burial takes place under heavy security in remote area of Cairo


    Egypt’s former president Mohamed Morsi has been buried in a remote area of Cairo as his treatment in custody before his death was denounced as torture.

    Morsi, the only democratically elected civilian leader in Egypt’s history, fainted in court on Monday and was pronounced dead on arrival in hospital. He was prosecuted on numerous charges after his one-year rule was brought to an end by a military coup in 2013.

    His burial in the outlying Nasser City district took place under heavy security. Morsi’s son Ahmed told the Associated Press that Egyptian authorities had refused to allow a burial at the family grounds in Sharqiyah province.

    The UN called for an independent investigation into Morsi’s death and his treatment in custody.

    Crispin Blunt, the former chair of the foreign affairs select committee in the UK parliament, also called for an investigation.

    Blunt led an independent review by British MPs in March last year which concluded that the conditions in which Morsi was being kept were likely to lead to his premature death, and which condemned his treatment as cruel, inhumane and degrading.

    Speaking after Morsi’s death, Blunt said: “We found that his detention could meet the threshold for torture in accordance Egyptian and international law. We found that the conditions of Dr Morsi’s detention would be of such continuing interest to the whole chain of command that the current president [the former army chief Abdel Fatah al-Sisi] could in principle be responsible for the crime of torture, which is a crime of universal jurisdiction.”

    Blunt said his main concern was that Morsi’s liver disease and diabetes were not being treated. “Dr Morsi’s death in custody is representative of Egypt’s inability to treat prisoners in accordance with both Egyptian and international law,” he said.

    Morsi was elected president in 2012 after the ousting of the dictator Hosni Mubarak during in the Arab spring. Morsi was a divisive ruler during his year in office, a symbol of Egyptian democracy to some and a conservative authoritarian in the eyes of his opponents, who feared he was putting his Islamist Muslim Brotherhood group before the good of the country.

    Military officials arrested Morsi in July 2013, followed by dozens of the Muslim Brotherhood’s top leadership. The former president received a 20-year sentence for the murder of protesters and a life sentence for passing state secrets to Qatar. A death sentence for charges connected to a mass jailbreak in 2011 was overturned in a 2016 retrial.

    In 2017 he was sentenced to a further two years in prison for insulting the judiciary. At the time of his death he was being retried on charges of spying for the Palestinian Islamist group Hamas.

    News of his death received scant coverage in the Egyptian media, with little mention of his time as president.

    International observers and supporters say Morsi’s death was caused by deliberately negligent medical care in prolonged solitary confinement, and that other members of the Muslim Brotherhood’s former leadership risk the same fate. Under the rule of Sisi there have been systematic efforts to crush the group.

    Two months of unrest in the summer of 2013 were marked by bursts of extreme violence against Muslim Brotherhood supporters. Human Rights Watch reported that at least 1,150 people were killed in five incidents in which security officials opened fire on demonstrators.

    Many of the survivors were arrested and the majority remain in prison. Egypt holds an estimated 60,000 political prisoners, many of them accused of being members of the Brotherhood.

    Egypt now considers the Muslim Brotherhood a terrorist organisation and has encouraged western nations such as the US to accept this definition. The head of Egypt’s State Information Service, Diaa Rashwan, was not available for comment when contacted by the Guardian.

    Rights groups say political prisoners including accused members of the Muslim Brotherhood are targeted for mistreatment while in mass incarceration. According to the US state department, this includes deliberate prolonged solitary confinement lasting almost six years in some cases, where prisoners are forbidden to leave their cells for more than an hour a day. Authorities have denied accused Brotherhood members and supporters full access to legal assistance, visits from their families and medical treatment.

    Hussein Baoumi, of Amnesty International, said members of the Brotherhood were among the political prisoners targeted for particularly intense solitary confinement, a form of torture. He said Egyptian authorities had tightened the noose even further on the Brotherhood in 2015 after the assassination of a former public prosecutor, Hisham Barakat.

    Family members of other prominent Muslim Brotherhood figures imprisoned in the maximum-security wing of Cairo’s Tora prison complex fear their relatives could suffer the same fate as Morsi. Relatives and supporters of Dr Essam Haddad, a former representative for international affairs under Morsi, and his son Gehad, a former Muslim Brotherhood spokesman, are concerned that their poor health and a sustained lack of medical treatment could lead to their deaths.

    “Both have been held in solitary confinement for six years. My father has suffered four heart attacks and he urgently needs medical attention. My brother Gehad was detained and tortured,” said Abdulla Haddad. “There are many others who are on the verge of death, and unless the international community speak out, many more will die, including my own father and brother.”

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...ced-as-torture







    Last edited by Junon; 06-20-2019 at 09:46 PM.

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    Junon's Avatar
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    Re: Mohammad Morsi has passed away

    Salaam

    More perspectives on his death.



    The tragic tale of Mohamed Morsi.

    Not even the MB’s first choice for presidency. He only ran as a substitute for the group’s most popular and bizarrely disqualified main candidate, Khairat El-Shater.

    Many agree that the group’s decision to take part in the election after Mubarak, made by Khairat, after promising not to, was perhaps its most fatal decision. But to run/end up with Morsi was a whole level of ineptitude and bankruptcy.

    Previously a parliamentarian in the Mubarak era and not one of the group’s top leadership, he was mocked endlessly for being put forward as an uninspiring spare إستبن

    The shafik/morsi election was brutal. It was poised as the final showdown of Mubarak’s state vs the fragile revolution. Everyone was swept in the divide and there was little to no one in the grey area. It was a question of who you despised more.

    I, along with many, voted for Morsi. I always think about that.

    I had never seen Cairo hold its breath collectively as it did the day the results were announced. There were rumors of forging the result. It was nasty. Everything was on the line.

    Morsi won 51% of the votes in what was the most dramatic but also only fair presidential election Egypt had seen. I doubt there’ll be anything ever like it.

    Here is a video of Tahrir square shot by @Eva nchill off a rooftop as we covered the official announcement. Hundreds of thousands jumped in celebration. You could literally feel the city shake. There was a sense of victory. https://youtu.be/h7grlfg0K2s

    Looking back at my personal reaction to this, it was a huge sigh of relief more than anything else. I thought we’d avoided a disaster by voting out Shafik. I was hopeful. Little did I know..

    It could be argued that doom was looming either way. That Morsi, in his troubled and short lived term, had no hand in the failure he was set up for. But every decision he took seemed worse than the other.

    His presidency seemed guided by greed and the benefit of his group rather than one of finding common ground. It was messy, bloody, and unstable. The army watched as people, many who voted him, asked for the military to step in.

    In fact, the middle ground he tried finding was with the military state, police and salafists. He appointed Sisi and Mohamed Ibrahim, who would later depose him.

    Morsi had no clear ideas, lacked charisma, and inspired no confidence. He faced an uphill of challenges and he failed at tackling them. He would become an easy and prime target for sisi.

    Morsi was removed a year later, on July 3, 2013, and would be charged in many farcical cases. None of which had to do with his mistakes but with vengeance of Mubarak state against the brotherhood. He died today during a trial for one of these cases.

    I don’t know where I’m going with this but it’s impossible not to be saddened by his death. It is cruel and vile. It was facilitated by the horrific conditions of his imprisonments. But it’s what Sisi’s regime is about: revenge.

    That revenge was extracted on Morsi supporter in Rabaa, the signal of death to the rule of law and sacredness of life in current Egypt. It is the era many continue to live in and for some lucky ones, observe from far.

    Revenge has since extended to other presidential candidates (including shafik), human rights activists, artists, journalists, students, footballers.

    So that is the tragic tale of Morsi, of the country he briefly ruled, and the people who briefly believed.

    Edit - Sorry missed this, more solidarity shown.



    Protests.





    How times change, 'a weeks a long time in politics' and all that, An example of the Saudis 'new' politcal direction.



    From the Egyptian regime.

    Last edited by Junon; 06-24-2019 at 11:05 PM.
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  14. #11
    Dr.Nurul Ameen.'s Avatar
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    Re: Mohammad Morsi has passed away

    May Allah, Peace be upon his departed soul.

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    anatolian's Avatar
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    Re: Mohammad Morsi has passed away

    This was taken only 40 days before the coup in Egypt

    DB631240-5A4D-4D09-9A1E-DB4792B348DE.jpeg
    Last edited by anatolian; 06-22-2019 at 12:39 PM.
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    Mohammad Morsi has passed away

    “Either seem as you are or be as you seem” Rumi

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    Insaanah's Avatar
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    Re: Mohammad Morsi has passed away


    It is not very often that mosques worldwide hold funeral prayers in absentia for someone. Allah honours whom he wills, even if they are being held in a metal cage and being deprived of basic humanitarian needs.
    | Likes Junon liked this post
    Mohammad Morsi has passed away


    Stunningly beautiful adhaan from the Dome of the Rock in Masjid ul Aqsa
    Download (right click and choose "save target/link as").


    This is a clear message for mankind in order that they may be warned thereby, and that they may know that He is only One God, and that those of understanding may take heed (14:52)


    Indeed Allah knows, and you know not (16: 74, part)

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    CuriousonTruth's Avatar
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    Re: Mohammad Morsi has passed away

    Quote Originally Posted by anatolian View Post
    This was taken only 40 days before the coup in Egypt

    DB631240-5A4D-4D09-9A1E-DB4792B348DE.jpeg
    I think you need to stop the "I hate Erdogan" act. It's getting quite annoying.

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    anatolian's Avatar
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    Re: Mohammad Morsi has passed away

    Quote Originally Posted by CuriousonTruth View Post
    I think you need to stop the "I hate Erdogan" act. It's getting quite annoying.
    Excuse me if it annoys you but I do hate Erdoğan and I have reasons for it.
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    Mohammad Morsi has passed away

    “Either seem as you are or be as you seem” Rumi

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    CuriousonTruth's Avatar
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    Re: Mohammad Morsi has passed away

    Quote Originally Posted by anatolian View Post
    Excuse me if it annoys you but I do hate Erdoğan and I have reasons for it.
    Including dishonest propaganda it seems. Morsi had appointed Sisi as defense minister and basically second in command of Egypt, what a surprise Erdogan talked with him in a State visit.

    Let's forget that Turkey is the only country that backed MB and helped some it's members escape Egypt. Oh and let's forget the spiritual leader of the Muslim Brotherhood Shaykh Yusuf Qaradawi is a massive Erdogan supporter.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by anatolian View Post
    Excuse me if it annoys you but I do hate Erdoğan and I have reasons for it.
    And one of the reasons you mentioned is that he uses religion.

    But I didn't see you complaining when "Imam"oglu shared pictures of him praying and kissing the Quran. And he is candidate of CHP a party that worked 70 years to brutally suppress and persecute Muslims.

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    anatolian's Avatar
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    Re: Mohammad Morsi has passed away

    Quote Originally Posted by CuriousonTruth View Post
    Including dishonest propaganda it seems. Morsi had appointed Sisi as defense minister and basically second in command of Egypt, what a surprise Erdogan talked with him in a State visit.

    Let's forget that Turkey is the only country that backed MB and helped some it's members escape Egypt. Oh and let's forget the spiritual leader of the Muslim Brotherhood Shaykh Yusuf Qaradawi is a massive Erdogan supporter.

    - - - Updated - - -
    In fact that wasnt a propaganda bc I didnt make a comment about it. I just informed you that Erdoğan met with sisi only 40 days before the coup. He is a very sneaky person and I dont want to disregard any possibility.

    What changes if entire MB support him? Any one can be fooled. Also I dont blame non-Turkish Erdoğan supporters so much. They are not directly effected by the filth he does in Turkey and they dont have right to vote him either. They (you) are concerned only in his Islamist policies. But we must discuss what Islamism is either..

    Quote Originally Posted by CuriousonTruth View Post
    And one of the reasons you mentioned is that he uses religion.

    But I didn't see you complaining when "Imam"oglu shared pictures of him praying and kissing the Quran. And he is candidate of CHP a party that worked 70 years to brutally suppress and persecute Muslims.
    My concern is not İmamoğlu. He is not erdoğan’s equaveliance either. My concern is only this capitalist parasite who appears to be the “Sultan Khalifa “.. Also I dont remember İmamoğlu sharing these kind of photos of his own. He prays in masjeeds and people may record him and publish in the media. He is not responsible of that. Erdoğan on the other hand is directly using Islam in his speaches to fool people. These two are different.
    Mohammad Morsi has passed away

    “Either seem as you are or be as you seem” Rumi

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    Junon's Avatar
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    Re: Mohammad Morsi has passed away

    Salaam

    Another update

    EXCLUSIVE: Egyptian officials threatened Morsi days before death

    Deposed former president was told to disband Muslim Brotherhood or face consequences in secret talks with top officials, sources tell Middle East Eye


    Mohamed Morsi and Muslim Brotherhood leaders in prison in Egypt were given an ultimatum by top officials to disband the organisation or face the consequences, Middle East Eye has learned.

    They had until the end of Ramadan to decide. Morsi refused and within days he was dead.

    Brotherhood members inside and outside Egypt now fear for the lives of Khairat el Shater, a former presidential candidate, and Mohammed Badie, the supreme guide of the Brotherhood, both of whom refused the offer.

    The demand to Morsi and Brotherhood leaders to close the organisation down was first outlined in a strategy document written by senior officials around President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi which was compiled shortly after his re-election last year.

    Middle East Eye has been briefed about its contents by multiple Egyptian opposition sources, one of whom had sight of it and who spoke about it on condition of anonymity.

    The sources told MEE they were aware of the document and the secret negotiations with Morsi before his sudden death in prison last Monday.

    'Closing the file of the Muslim Brotherhood'

    Some details of the protracted contacts between Egyptian officials and Morsi over the last few months have been withheld for fear of endangering the lives of prisoners.

    Entitled “Closing the file of the Muslim Brotherhood”, the government document argued that the Brotherhood had been delivered a blow by the military coup in 2013, which was unprecedented in its history and bigger than the crackdowns the Islamist organisation faced under former presidents Nasser and Mubarak.

    The document argued that the Brotherhood had been fatally weakened and there was now no clear chain of command.

    It stated that the Brotherhood could no longer be considered a threat to the state of Egypt, and that the main problem now was the number of prisoners in jail.

    The number of political prisoners from all opposition factions, secular and Islamist, is estimated to be about 60,000.

    The government document envisaged closing the organisation down within three years.

    It offered freedom to members of the Brotherhood who guaranteed to take no further part in politics or “dawa”, the preaching and social activities of the movement.

    Those who refused would be threatened with yet further harsh sentences and prison for life. The document thought that 75 percent of the rank and file would accept.

    If they agreed to close the movement down the leadership would be offered better prison conditions.

    https://www.middleeasteye.net/news/e...als-days-death

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    Junon's Avatar
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    Re: Mohammad Morsi has passed away

    Salaam

    Another update.





    Random example



    In the wake of the death of former Egyptian president Mohammad Morsi, there has been a wave of solidarity among the Muslim Brotherhood and its supporters in Egypt and abroad. Competing groups, beset by a deep divide caused by two strands of leadership each claiming legitimacy and a widening generation gap among its members, have come together temporarily.

    But in the long run, the fallout from Morsi’s death will deepen the crises afflicting the Brotherhood, namely the lack of a political vision and the quiet wave of radicalization among the youth.

    The Guidance Bureau, the top executive body of the Brotherhood, has failed to formulate a coherent strategy since Morsi’s ousting from government in July 2013. Initially leaders chose to mobilize their supporters in large peaceful demonstrations every Friday to counter the measures taken by the Egyptian armed forces against Morsi.

    These demonstrations continued on a weekly basis in many governorates between 2013 and 2014, before beginning to fade in the first half of 2015 as younger members began to question the effectiveness of this approach. They called on their leadership to present a clear opposition strategy with which to face the incumbent political regime and to not push them to join demonstrations without a clear set of goals and demands.

    One strand of the leadership led by Mohammed Kamal, a member of the Guidance Bureau, responded to these calls by proposing a new strategy based on the use of limited violence to undermine the stability of state institutions. This approach was rejected by the historic leadership led by Deputy Supreme Guide Mahmoud Ezzat. Both groups failed to offer an alternative approach, leaving the movement with no effective strategy with which to deal with the political situation at hand.

    Given this lack of strategy, the demand to bring Morsi back to power appeared to be the only aim that the different groups within the organization could agree on, albeit an unrealistic one. In light of Morsi’s death, the movement’s lack of strategy is more exposed than ever, leaving it with nothing to hide behind.

    At the grassroots’ level, the youth of the Brotherhood has undergone a profound but quiet wave of radicalization over the past few years. The same individuals who in January 2011 believed in nonviolent action as a means to introduce political change now openly call this naïve and are questioning the efficacy of non-violence as one of the ideological pillars of the Muslim Brotherhood. Although they still reject the idea of excommunicating members of state institutions, the stance of Salafi jihadism, they believe that violence should be considered as a political option and should not be dismissed ideologically.

    Unlike Salafi jihadist groups, who believe in armed struggle for its own sake, this young generation of the Brotherhood see violent resistance more as a means to an end, which means that few are advocating for violence now. The see that under the current balance of power between the movement and the Egyptian state, they would have no chance of winning in armed conflict against the security forces.

    But disappointed by the leadership and the lack of strategy, many of the younger generation have taken a step back from the movement. They are simultaneously becoming more passive and more radical in their views about how to conduct political change. Morsi’s death has laid bare the void of political strategy afflicting the leadership and will deepen the process of quiet radicalization among the youth.

    https://www.chathamhouse.org/expert/...im-brotherhood
    Last edited by Junon; 06-27-2019 at 11:19 PM.

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    Junon's Avatar
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    Re: Mohammad Morsi has passed away

    Salaam

    More comment

    Morsi, did he die or was he assassinated?

    The Egyptian state TV announced, Monday, the death of the former Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi during the trial on espionage with Hamas. It reported that he asked the judge to speak, he spoke for 20 minutes and then raised his head and fell unconscious and passed away.

    In fact, Morsi’s real death was in 2013, Dr Amira abo el-Fetouh argues when he was removed through a military coup and was sent to prison. The death of the first-ever freely elected Egyptian president was when his legitimacy was killed and the will of millions of Egyptians – who were happy that Egypt ended a military dictatorship – died.

    Since the time when he was ousted, the military has been looking for a way to get rid of him, because his being alive ment that he remained the legitimate leader of the country in the eyes of millions who elected him. In addition, he would remain a symbol for free Egypt as long as he is alive because he was freely elected and unleashed the reign for all freedoms during the one year he was in office. Therefore, I believe he did not die but was assassinated.

    Regardless to the solitary confinement, psychological and physical torture under which tens of Muslim Brotherhood members and leaders perished, and the intentional medical negligence for an old man who suffered from kidney failure, diabetes and hypertension, there are many other pieces of evidence that suggest he was assassinated.

    The judiciary claimed he spoke for about 20 minutes and then raised his head and collapsed and State TV reported claims that he had received proper medical treatment during his detention and when he was in the courtroom. How can the Egyptian authorities prove their claims? Why do the Egyptian authorities not release documents about the history of his medical tests and follow up and the footage of his last moments when he was in the court?

    Someone might say that the authorities might release footage of him from previous hearings, but this could be judged by an impartial international investigative committee. Would Egyptian authorities accept an international investigation committee to probe his death and access such footage?

    A spokesman for the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), Rupert Colville said: “Any sudden death in custody must be followed by a prompt, impartial, thorough and transparent investigation carried out by an independent body to clarify the cause of death.”

    If Morsi was not assassinated, why did the Egyptian authorities not release his body to be seen by his relatives and the public? Why did they insist that he must be buried in the dark? If they claimed they did so in order to undermine any massive funeral which could turn violent or trigger a wave of protests against the leader of the military coup in the country, I say that putting off the funeral for a couple of days until the body is seen by the family and loved ones or allowed to be buried in the family grave would not cause a problem as long as the military services are in control of all the alleyways across the country and even have given directions to the Imams not to perform the funeral prayer at the mosques.

    Why did the Egyptian authorities not let professionals perform an autopsy to the body in order to identify the real reason for his death? If they are sure they did not assassinate him, the findings of the autopsy would let people trust their narrative and would quell any potential plan to protest against them.

    Then, I do not believe it is a mere coincidence that he died on the anniversary of the same day he was elected president. On 16 and 17 June 2012, the Egyptians voted for him and on 17 June 2019 he died. No, this is a significant reason to doubt the claim of natural death.

    Another suggestion that he was assassinated is the lesson which the Egyptian coup regime wanted to teach to the people who plan to fulfil the dreams of the Egyptians about having a free country run by a civil ruler that this is his end.

    Head of Egyptian Institute for Studies Amro Darraj told Al-Jazeera TV on Monday that Morsi did not die, but was assassinated by the military because they knew that the international community would not seek justice against him. I say, the military assassinated Morsi because the international community which demonise Islam, Muslims and Muslim Brotherhood had encouraged them to.

    https://www.middleeastmonitor.com/20...-assassinated/


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