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asad1
05-26-2008, 11:53 PM
Are Muslims allowed to drink non alcoholic wine?
I've never drunk alcohol in my life and never will do so before I buy I would just like to know if I can even drink it
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medlink student
05-27-2008, 12:00 AM
:sl:

plz read this fatwa
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جوري
05-27-2008, 12:00 AM
nonalcoholic is still alcoholic.. pls read how it is made...
:w:


How are nonalcoholic beer and wine made?

Put simply, you make alcoholic beer or wine, and then remove the alcohol. You do this by distilling the beverage, as if you were going to make liquor. But rather than save the booze and throw out the rest, you throw out the booze.

When you make alcohol, you typically heat up whatever it is you’re distilling to boil off the alcohol (which you collect in vapor form, then cool back into liquid). It doesn’t matter all that much if the water, syrups, herbs, and whatever else that’s in your base get a little cooked in the process, because you’re tossing out most of that in the end anyway. When making nonalcoholic beverages, though, maintaining the flavor of the base is important, because you’ll save that part, and you want it to taste as much like real beer or wine as possible. So you don’t want to cook it.

There are two ways to get the booze out that don’t require high heat. The first is a process called vacuum distillation. The beer or wine is put under a vacuum. The change in atmospheric pressure allows the producer to boil the liquids at a lower temperature, or in some cases with no heat at all, and distill off the alcohol.

The second process is called reverse osmosis, and is the same method often used to purify drinking water. It doesn’t require any heating. The wine or beer is passed through a filter with pores so small that only alcohol and water (and a few volatile acids) can pass through. The alcohol is distilled out of the alcohol-water mix using conventional distillation methods, and the water and remaining acids are added back into the syrupy mixture of sugars and flavor compounds left on the other side of the filter. Bingo—a nonalcoholic (or dealcoholized, as winemakers call it) brew.

But do nonalcoholic beers and wines taste the same as alcoholic ones? Almost. Most of the flavor of real beer and wine comes from the grain or grapes, plus flavor compounds from the fermentation and aging process. Nonalcoholic beers and wines still have all that. Alcohol in the real stuff contributes mouthfeel and a small amount of flavor. It actually makes wine taste sweeter, says Jeff Meier, vice president of winemaking for J. Lohr Vineyards & Wines, which makes Ariel nonalcoholic wines. This means that a dealcoholized wine needs about 2.5 percent residual sugar content to best match a completely dry (no residual sugar) alcoholic wine.

“Nonalcoholic” beverages still contain some alcohol, because it’s difficult and prohibitively expensive to get every single bit of it out. In order to be called nonalcoholic under federal laws, a beverage can contain up to half a percent of alcohol by volume. (Something with no alcohol at all is called alcohol-free.) So people who are forbidden to drink alcohol, like devout Muslims, can’t partake in so-called nonalcoholic beer and wine. Nor can people under the age of 21, according to the law. It takes about 10 nonalcoholic malt beverages to equal the alcohol in one American-style lager, says George Reisch, a veteran brewer with Anheuser-Busch and the former brewmaster of O’Doul’s.

One last point, about carbonation: When making nonalcoholic sparkling wine, producers do a secondary fermentation just like they do with regular sparkling wine. But the alcohol it produces is less than .5 percent, so the wine is still considered nonalcoholic. As for the carbonation in beer, like in most alcoholic beer, it’s “forced” with a charge of carbon dioxide at the brewery.


http://www.chow.com/stories/10519
Reply

جوري
05-27-2008, 12:01 AM
nonalcoholic is still alcoholic.. pls read how it is made...
:w:


How are nonalcoholic beer and wine made?

Put simply, you make alcoholic beer or wine, and then remove the alcohol. You do this by distilling the beverage, as if you were going to make liquor. But rather than save the booze and throw out the rest, you throw out the booze.

When you make alcohol, you typically heat up whatever it is you’re distilling to boil off the alcohol (which you collect in vapor form, then cool back into liquid). It doesn’t matter all that much if the water, syrups, herbs, and whatever else that’s in your base get a little cooked in the process, because you’re tossing out most of that in the end anyway. When making nonalcoholic beverages, though, maintaining the flavor of the base is important, because you’ll save that part, and you want it to taste as much like real beer or wine as possible. So you don’t want to cook it.

There are two ways to get the booze out that don’t require high heat. The first is a process called vacuum distillation. The beer or wine is put under a vacuum. The change in atmospheric pressure allows the producer to boil the liquids at a lower temperature, or in some cases with no heat at all, and distill off the alcohol.

The second process is called reverse osmosis, and is the same method often used to purify drinking water. It doesn’t require any heating. The wine or beer is passed through a filter with pores so small that only alcohol and water (and a few volatile acids) can pass through. The alcohol is distilled out of the alcohol-water mix using conventional distillation methods, and the water and remaining acids are added back into the syrupy mixture of sugars and flavor compounds left on the other side of the filter. Bingo—a nonalcoholic (or dealcoholized, as winemakers call it) brew.

But do nonalcoholic beers and wines taste the same as alcoholic ones? Almost. Most of the flavor of real beer and wine comes from the grain or grapes, plus flavor compounds from the fermentation and aging process. Nonalcoholic beers and wines still have all that. Alcohol in the real stuff contributes mouthfeel and a small amount of flavor. It actually makes wine taste sweeter, says Jeff Meier, vice president of winemaking for J. Lohr Vineyards & Wines, which makes Ariel nonalcoholic wines. This means that a dealcoholized wine needs about 2.5 percent residual sugar content to best match a completely dry (no residual sugar) alcoholic wine.

“Nonalcoholic” beverages still contain some alcohol, because it’s difficult and prohibitively expensive to get every single bit of it out. In order to be called nonalcoholic under federal laws, a beverage can contain up to half a percent of alcohol by volume. (Something with no alcohol at all is called alcohol-free.) So people who are forbidden to drink alcohol, like devout Muslims, can’t partake in so-called nonalcoholic beer and wine. Nor can people under the age of 21, according to the law. It takes about 10 nonalcoholic malt beverages to equal the alcohol in one American-style lager, says George Reisch, a veteran brewer with Anheuser-Busch and the former brewmaster of O’Doul’s.

One last point, about carbonation: When making nonalcoholic sparkling wine, producers do a secondary fermentation just like they do with regular sparkling wine. But the alcohol it produces is less than .5 percent, so the wine is still considered nonalcoholic. As for the carbonation in beer, like in most alcoholic beer, it’s “forced” with a charge of carbon dioxide at the brewery.


http://www.chow.com/stories/10519
Reply

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asad1
05-27-2008, 12:06 AM
Originally Posted by Skye Ephémérine
nonalcoholic is still alcoholic.. pls read how it is made...
:w:


How are nonalcoholic beer and wine made?

Put simply, you make alcoholic beer or wine, and then remove the alcohol. You do this by distilling the beverage, as if you were going to make liquor. But rather than save the booze and throw out the rest, you throw out the booze.

When you make alcohol, you typically heat up whatever it is you’re distilling to boil off the alcohol (which you collect in vapor form, then cool back into liquid). It doesn’t matter all that much if the water, syrups, herbs, and whatever else that’s in your base get a little cooked in the process, because you’re tossing out most of that in the end anyway. When making nonalcoholic beverages, though, maintaining the flavor of the base is important, because you’ll save that part, and you want it to taste as much like real beer or wine as possible. So you don’t want to cook it.

There are two ways to get the booze out that don’t require high heat. The first is a process called vacuum distillation. The beer or wine is put under a vacuum. The change in atmospheric pressure allows the producer to boil the liquids at a lower temperature, or in some cases with no heat at all, and distill off the alcohol.

The second process is called reverse osmosis, and is the same method often used to purify drinking water. It doesn’t require any heating. The wine or beer is passed through a filter with pores so small that only alcohol and water (and a few volatile acids) can pass through. The alcohol is distilled out of the alcohol-water mix using conventional distillation methods, and the water and remaining acids are added back into the syrupy mixture of sugars and flavor compounds left on the other side of the filter. Bingo—a nonalcoholic (or dealcoholized, as winemakers call it) brew.

But do nonalcoholic beers and wines taste the same as alcoholic ones? Almost. Most of the flavor of real beer and wine comes from the grain or grapes, plus flavor compounds from the fermentation and aging process. Nonalcoholic beers and wines still have all that. Alcohol in the real stuff contributes mouthfeel and a small amount of flavor. It actually makes wine taste sweeter, says Jeff Meier, vice president of winemaking for J. Lohr Vineyards & Wines, which makes Ariel nonalcoholic wines. This means that a dealcoholized wine needs about 2.5 percent residual sugar content to best match a completely dry (no residual sugar) alcoholic wine.

“Nonalcoholic” beverages still contain some alcohol, because it’s difficult and prohibitively expensive to get every single bit of it out. In order to be called nonalcoholic under federal laws, a beverage can contain up to half a percent of alcohol by volume. (Something with no alcohol at all is called alcohol-free.) So people who are forbidden to drink alcohol, like devout Muslims, can’t partake in so-called nonalcoholic beer and wine. Nor can people under the age of 21, according to the law. It takes about 10 nonalcoholic malt beverages to equal the alcohol in one American-style lager, says George Reisch, a veteran brewer with Anheuser-Busch and the former brewmaster of O’Doul’s.

One last point, about carbonation: When making nonalcoholic sparkling wine, producers do a secondary fermentation just like they do with regular sparkling wine. But the alcohol it produces is less than .5 percent, so the wine is still considered nonalcoholic. As for the carbonation in beer, like in most alcoholic beer, it’s “forced” with a charge of carbon dioxide at the brewery.


http://www.chow.com/stories/10519
Thank you very much for the above information, so is alcohol free wine allowed?
Reply

noorseeker
05-27-2008, 12:09 AM
you can have plenty of wine in jannah bro inshallah
Reply

جوري
05-27-2008, 12:09 AM
No akhi did you read the article? there is no such thing as alcohol free wine, it is made with alcohol distilled then evaporated, you can't remove all the alcohol from it...as is said in Islam ma askar katheeroho fa qaleeloho 7ram.. i.e that which will cause a stupor in large amount is forbidden in low amounts...

the only time you can have alcohol is for medicinal reasons if no other substitute is found on the account that necessity overrides prohibition..

And Allah knows best

:w:
Reply

Mikayeel
05-27-2008, 12:37 AM
Originally Posted by Skye Ephémérine
No akhi did you read the article? there is no such thing as alcohol free wine, it is made with alcohol distilled then evaporated, you can't remove all the alcohol from it...as is said in Islam ma askar katheeroho fa qaleeloho 7ram.. i.e that which will cause a stupor in large amount is forbidden in low amounts...

the only time you can have alcohol is for medicinal reasons if no other substitute is found on the account that necessity overrides prohibition..

And Allah knows best

:w:
:sl: sister, so u no them flavoured beers, that you can buy in Halal arab shops are haram aswell then?

Shukran
Reply

MKE Brother
05-27-2008, 12:45 AM
Before my "reversion" alcohol had been a part of my life and I can tell you that not even people who drink regular beer and wine regularly want to touch the NA stuff :X and as everyone has said, there is still an ever so small amount of alcohol left in them. Example; if you get caught drinking the stuff while driving here you immediately get it for having an open container of alcohol.
Reply

جوري
05-27-2008, 12:46 AM
Originally Posted by raOnar
:sl: sister, so u no them flavored beers,
w3lykoum aslaam wr wb
I can't say that I know anything about flavoured beers no...

that you can buy in Halal arab shops are haram aswell then?

Shukran
Many Arab store owners are christian and I know for a fact that lebanese make their own wine from rice sort of like saki, but I digress.. what you need to do is grab the bottle and look at it, if it says 0% then it isn't 7aram
if it says 1-2% then it is..
and Allah knows best

:w:
Reply

Nσσя'υℓ Jαииαн
05-27-2008, 12:47 AM
Nonalcoholic drinks still contain some alcohol bro.

“Nonalcoholic” beverages still contain some alcohol, because it’s difficult and prohibitively expensive to get every single bit of it out. In order to be called nonalcoholic under federal laws, a beverage can contain up to half a percent of alcohol by volume. (Something with no alcohol at all is called alcohol-free.) So people who are forbidden to drink alcohol, like devout Muslims, can’t partake in so-called nonalcoholic beer and wine. Nor can people under the age of 21, according to the law. It takes about 10 nonalcoholic malt beverages to equal the alcohol in one American-style lager, says George Reisch, a veteran brewer with Anheuser-Busch and the former brewmaster of O’Doul’s.

Many Arab store owners are christian and I know for a fact that lebanese make their own wine from rice sort of like saki, but I digress.. what you need to do is grab the bottle and look at it, if it says 0% then it isn't 7aram
if it says 1-2% then it is..

and Allah knows best
:sl:
Reply

جوري
05-27-2008, 12:50 AM
^^^ lol perhaps that is what I should have done, highlighted the quote that mattered from the article...

I don't think anyone is interested in reading a long protracted article anymore :-[


:w:
Reply

Nσσя'υℓ Jαииαн
05-27-2008, 12:51 AM
Lol I did sis :-[ Since I'm doing a science major...I prefer reading it :)
Reply

جوري
05-27-2008, 01:00 AM
Originally Posted by MKE Brother
not even people who drink regular beer and wine regularly want to touch the NA stuff :X
:lol: yeah.. it is pretty nasty, and smells awful too!

:w:
Reply

------
05-28-2008, 08:34 AM
:salamext:

:| Wine, Alcohol, Bacon = HARAAM!!
Reply

asad1
05-28-2008, 08:29 PM
oh ok

but would something like this be allowed, especially as it is 0% beer and is also vegetarian:

http://www.alcoholfree.co.uk/product...roducts_id=184
Reply

جوري
05-28-2008, 08:34 PM
alcohol free and non-alcoholic are different.. non-alcoholic is made by process of fermentation, condensation and evaporation, they can't remove all alcohol from it... but seeing the price of that maybe they have...

I have always enjoyed this hadith when it comes to matters of doubt

On the authority of Al-Numan bin Basheer, who said : I heared the messenger of Allah say :

"That which is lawful is plain and that which is unlawful is plain and between the two of them are doubtful matters about which not many people know. Thus he who avoids doubtful matters clears himself in regard to his religion and his honor, but he who falls into doubtful matters falls into that which is unlawful, like the shepherd who pastures around a sanctuary, all but grazing therein. Truly every king has a sanctuary, and truly Allah's sanctuary is His prohibitions. Truly in the body there is a morsel of flesh which, if it be whole, all the body is whole and which, if it be diseased, all of it is diseased. Truly it is the heart."


and Allah knows best

:w:
Reply

MKE Brother
05-28-2008, 08:50 PM
An interesting thread from another forum regarding that Cobra 0.0% beer; http://forum.mpacuk.org/showthread.php?t=30390
Reply

Umar001
05-28-2008, 08:55 PM
Just wondering, would there also be an issue of imitating non believers, I mean, we are buying something they only buy but just trying to make it halal?

I really think you should ask scholars bro.
Reply

north_malaysian
05-29-2008, 05:03 AM
luckily I love Milo...:D I am a Milo-person
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