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glo
08-28-2008, 06:21 PM
Today I gave blood - and it got me to wonder whether giving blood was Islamically permitted/encouraged?

Foe anybody in the UK, who is interested, here is the official website: http://www.blood.co.uk/

(Foolishly I had not eaten or drunk for several hous before (silly thing to do!), which resulted in me passing out when I sat up after the domantion. One moment I was sitting there, applying pressure to the inside of my elbow ... thinking 'ooh oh, I am feeling a little lightheaded' ... the next moment I am lying back on the stretcher, with three female attendance fluttering around me, patting my cheek, asking my name, wiping up blood. How embarrassing! :-[ That's never happened to me before)
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bewildred
08-28-2008, 06:38 PM
I give my blood on a very regular basis. I don't think it's forbidden, to the contrary......
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Afifa
08-28-2008, 06:43 PM
Iv always thought and wanted to give blood but never have
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Uthman
08-28-2008, 06:48 PM
Hi glo,

I believe it is permissible provided two conditions are met:

1. There is no serious harm to the donator.
2. It will be of great benefit to the receiver.

That is what I have heard the people of knowledge say.

And Allah knows best
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Uthman
08-28-2008, 08:58 PM
By the way, I must take this opportunity to commend you on your decision to donate blood. That's a very commendable deed.
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BintAmjad
08-28-2008, 09:29 PM
Peace to all I've never given blood but have always wanted to

According to Islam there is no problem with giving blood to anyone if someone is in urgent need of it. As long as they are not hostile towards Islam or are in a state of war against us. It's just like giving charity so whoever gives it is rewarded.

Check out the following link for more detail:

http://www.islam-qa.com/en/ref/12729/giving%20blood

Hope that answers your question
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glo
08-29-2008, 06:07 AM
Originally Posted by x-Afifa-x
Iv always thought and wanted to give blood but never have
Originally Posted by BintAmjad
Peace to all I've never given blood but have always wanted to
If you are thinking about it, then just go and do it!

It may not be the most pleasant experience, but it is over quite quickly - and a person in need will benefit from it.
It could even save somebody's life, and that's surely a wonderful deed! :)

Salaam
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glo
08-29-2008, 06:09 AM
Originally Posted by BintAmjad
According to Islam there is no problem with giving blood to anyone if someone is in urgent need of it. As long as they are not hostile towards Islam or are in a state of war against us. It's just like giving charity so whoever gives it is rewarded.
Are you saying only Islam-friendly deserve to have their life saved?? :?

Is that what Muhammed (PBUH) would have done?
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coddles76
08-29-2008, 06:18 AM
Originally Posted by glo
Are you saying only Islam-friendly deserve to have their life saved?? :?

Is that what Muhammed (PBUH) would have done?
I think what the brother is trying to say is that you would not give blood to an enemy who is out to kill or destroy you. Would you give someone a knife in which he/she could attack and kill you?

You can donate blood to anybody as long as the person who is recieving your blood will not use it against you to further down the track return and perform a set of voilent acts upon you.
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glo
08-29-2008, 06:51 AM
Originally Posted by coddles76
You can donate blood to anybody as long as the person who is recieving your blood will not use it against you to further down the track return and perform a set of voilent acts upon you.
But how could you possibly have that guarantee?
You donate your blood to be given to a stranger in need - no way of telling whether that stranger is friend and foe ...

Would this discourage Muslims from giving blood, you think?
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north_malaysian
08-29-2008, 07:09 AM
Originally Posted by glo
Today I gave blood - and it got me to wonder whether giving blood was Islamically permitted/encouraged?

Foe anybody in the UK, who is interested, here is the official website: http://www.blood.co.uk/

(Foolishly I had not eaten or drunk for several hous before (silly thing to do!), which resulted in me passing out when I sat up after the domantion. One moment I was sitting there, applying pressure to the inside of my elbow ... thinking 'ooh oh, I am feeling a little lightheaded' ... the next moment I am lying back on the stretcher, with three female attendance fluttering around me, patting my cheek, asking my name, wiping up blood. How embarrassing! :-[ That's never happened to me before)
They dont give food or drink to you? When I was in the Malaysian Red Crescent Society, we gave cakes, biscuits and hot chocolate drinks to blood donors...
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Fazl Ahmad
08-29-2008, 07:34 AM
Assalamu alaikum

Giving blood is definitely a merituous act and should be encouraged. However, I was wandering that if someone is diabetic or has high level of sugar in their blood if it is healthy for them to give blood, and if so if it is healthy for the recipient to receive that donor's blood?
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syilla
08-29-2008, 08:04 AM
Originally Posted by north_malaysian
They dont give food or drink to you? When I was in the Malaysian Red Crescent Society, we gave cakes, biscuits and hot chocolate drinks to blood donors...
they even get special treatment (vip card) when they go for treatment in any government hospital.

Did you know that in Malaysia...the malaysian only pay rm5 for specialist checkup at the fully government hospital? and did you know that you only pay max rm50 (i think 3rd class room) for surgery (it depends on the complication but still it is very cheap)
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north_malaysian
08-29-2008, 08:54 AM
Originally Posted by syilla
they even get special treatment (vip card) when they go for treatment in any government hospital.

Did you know that in Malaysia...the malaysian only pay rm5 for specialist checkup at the fully government hospital? and did you know that you only pay max rm50 (i think 3rd class room) for surgery (it depends on the complication but still it is very cheap)
In Brunei and Cuba...100% of your healthcare is being sponsored by the government... I wonder when Malaysia could do that...
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glo
08-29-2008, 09:44 AM
Originally Posted by north_malaysian
They dont give food or drink to you? When I was in the Malaysian Red Crescent Society, we gave cakes, biscuits and hot chocolate drinks to blood donors...
You are given biscuits and drinks after the donation, but not before.

You are advised not to skip meals before donating blood, and to have plenty to drink ... which I forgot to do. :-[
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manaal
08-29-2008, 05:27 PM
:X Errrm, about not giving blood to your enemies. Think about this, would a Georgian refugee donate blood to a Russian soldier right now?
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جوري
08-29-2008, 05:52 PM
That is how the U.S sets up its bivouacs.. soldiers with the same blood type in each unit, so they may donate to one another when wounded right away..
that is intelligent warfare.. perhaps we too should give some thought to battle before we jump in head first..

:w:
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glo
08-29-2008, 06:08 PM
Originally Posted by manaal
:X Errrm, about not giving blood to your enemies. Think about this, would a Georgian refugee donate blood to a Russian soldier right now?
Would s/he? Probably not.
But should /she? I think yes.

Here is why:

Love for Enemies
"But I tell you who hear me: Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, bless those who curse you, pray for those who mistreat you. If someone strikes you on one cheek, turn to him the other also. If someone takes your cloak, do not stop him from taking your tunic. Give to everyone who asks you, and if anyone takes what belongs to you, do not demand it back. Do to others as you would have them do to you.

"If you love those who love you, what credit is that to you? Even 'sinners' love those who love them. And if you do good to those who are good to you, what credit is that to you? Even 'sinners' do that. And if you lend to those from whom you expect repayment, what credit is that to you? Even 'sinners' lend to 'sinners,' expecting to be repaid in full. But love your enemies, do good to them, and lend to them without expecting to get anything back. Then your reward will be great, and you will be sons of the Most High, because he is kind to the ungrateful and wicked. Be merciful, just as your Father is merciful.

(Luke 6:27-36)
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جوري
08-29-2008, 06:10 PM
we are sold on sanctimony indeed, as we see it employed by the west every day
thanks
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crayon
08-29-2008, 07:12 PM
GIVING blood is permissible while SELLING blood is not.

http://www.islamonline.net/fatwa/eng...hFatwaID=46068
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coddles76
09-01-2008, 05:57 AM
Originally Posted by glo
But how could you possibly have that guarantee?
You donate your blood to be given to a stranger in need - no way of telling whether that stranger is friend and foe ...

Would this discourage Muslims from giving blood, you think?
When you are in the state of War, you clearly know who your enemies are. This is what the rule stands for. In normal circumstances when you are not in a state of battle and war then I'm sure you may give blood as required.
And Allah SWT knows best!
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Abdul Fattah
09-01-2008, 10:12 AM
I have a rare bloodtype B- (about 15 out of 1000 people).
I went twice a couple months ago to donate. The first time they as they put in the needle, they put it to deep and pushed it out the other side. Since red-cross protocol says they can only sting once, I didn't get to donate that day. Then the second time I went they put the needle just fine, but after a minute or so my blood started to cloth and it blocked the blood so they didn't get enough for a donation. Now I have to wait 6 months before I can go again...
^_^
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جوري
09-01-2008, 05:47 PM
What are the odds, I have your blood type too B-..
There are minor RBC antibodies known as immunoglobulins and are associated with RBC antigens other than ABO and RH.. Duffy, kell antigens etc located on the red blood cell membrane and lead to a delayed typed ransfusion reaction..
and it is a very expansive topic that I thought I'd link to it on this page, if anyone is interested in the molecular biology of it. Usually every hospital blood bank deals with this.. I have seen pts after a transfusion reaction develop antibodies to about 99% of blood types including auto-immune to their own.. which is really very unfortunate

here is a great article on this

BLOOD TYPING SYSTEMS OTHER THAN ABO
BLOODBOOK.COM






BLOOD TYPES AND LISTS OF 'OTHER' VALUABLE BLOOD TYPING SYSTEMS USED FOR BLOOD TYPES AND BLOOD TYPING REFERENCE AND BLOOD TEST TYPE RESEARCH - DIFFERENCES IN BLOOD TYPES.

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First A Word About ABO Incompatibility.
Transfusing a patient with the incorrect ABO group Blood may have fatal consequences. Donor red cells may be destroyed by an antibody in the recipient's plasma. The rapid intravascular hemolysis which occurs in ABO incompatible transfusions can precipitate severe disseminated coagulation (DIC), prolonged hypotension, acute uraemia and even death. It has also been recognized that a potent anti-A or anti-B in donor Blood of group O may destroy the A or B red cells of a non-O recipient. This, together with the discovery of other red cell group systems, has completely altered the significance of the term 'universal donor' which is often applied to Blood of group O.





Group O Blood has neither A nor B Antigens. In the past, type O Blood was given to anyone. Donors of Blood group O were, in years past, referred to as 'universal donors.' Today, because of a better understanding of the complex issues regarding immune reaction related to incompatible donor Blood cells, type O Blood is no longer automatically seen as being suitable in most every case. Group AB Blood has neither anti A nor anti B antibodies, so any Blood can be transfused into it. Hence, persons with Blood group AB have often been seen as 'universal recipients.' [view full text HERE]





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In 1901 Karl Landsteiner discovered that when the Blood of one human being was transfused with that of another human being, differences in their Blood might well be the cause of shock, jaundice, and the Blood disorder hemoglobinuria that had resulted through earlier Blood transfusions.
Landsteiner classified human Blood into A, B, and O groups and demonstrated that transfusions between humans of group A or B did not result in the destruction of new Blood cells and that this catastrophe occurred only when a person was transfused with the Blood of a person belonging to a different group. A fourth main Blood type, AB was found in 1902 by A. Decastrello and A. Sturli.

From that time, differing Blood typing systems have been devised. Historically the naming of Blood grouping systems has been disorganized. The common conventions stipulating that dominant traits be given capital letters and recessive traits be designated with lower case letters have not been followed. Also by tradition, red cell antigens were given alphabetical designations or were named after the family of the antibody producer.

The International Society of Blood Transfusion (ISBT) has instituted a numerical system of nomenclature to help standardize red cell Blood group terminology. This convention mandates that each system and collection has been given a number and letter designation, and each antigen within the system is numbered sequentially in order of discovery. As of this writing, over 20 Blood group systems and seven antigen collections have been defined. High-prevalence or "public" antigens and low-prevalence or "private" antigens that are not associated with known systems or collections also are delineated in numbered series.

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Some systems (i. e. H, Ii, Lewis) delineate naturally occurring antibodies, but most of the other systems give rise to iso-antibodies, which result from incompatible transfusions and pregnancy. Following here is an ISBT Type/Class Chart.



CONVENTIONAL NAME ISBT SYMBOL ISBT NUMBER ANTIGENS
BLOOD GROUP SYSTEMS

ABO ABO 001 4
MNSs MNS 002 37
P P1 003 1
Rh RH 004 47
Lutheran LU 005 18
Kell KEL 006 21
Lewis LE 007 3
Duffy FY 008 6
Kidd JK 009 3
Diego DI 010 2
Cartwright YT 011 2
Xg XG 012 1
Scianna SC 013 3
Dombrock DO 014 5
Colton CO 015 3
Landsteiner-Wiener LW 016 3
Chido/Rogers CH/RG 017 9
Hh H 018 1
Kx XK 019 1
Gerbich GE 020 7
Cromer CROMER 021 10
Knops KN 022 5
Indian IN 023 2
Ok OK 024 - -

Raph RAPH 025 - -

JMH JMH 026 - -

ANTIGEN COLLECTIONS

Cost COST 205 2
Ii I 207 2
Er ER 208 2
P, P1, LKE GLOBO 209 3
Lewis-like: Le-c, Le-d - -
210 2
Wright WR 211 2
Low Prevalence

Low Prevalence - -
700 36
High Prevalence

High Prevalence - -
911 11




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The MNSs System
This system was discovered by injecting animals with human red cells. There are two loci: M/N and S/s. The antigens are M, N, S, and s. There are naturally occurring (IgM) antibodies to all these antigens. Anti-S and anti-s commonly develop immune characteristics (IgG class) as a result of pregnancy or transfusion.


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The P System
This system was also discovered by injecting animals with human red cells. P1 is the most common antigen which has variable strength of expression. Anti-P1 may be naturally occurring. It is most often an IgM antibody.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Lutheran (Lu) System
This system is a single locus system, with antigens Lua and Lub. The Lu(a) negative phenotype is very rare. Antibodies to Lutheran antigens are IgG. The genes of the Lutheran group are linked to the genes responsible for the secretion of ABH substances.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Kell System
In this system there are four antigens at two loci: K (Kell) and k (cellano), and Kpa and Kpb. The Kp(a+) phenotype and the Kp(a-b-) phenotype are both rare. The Knull phenotype K- k- Kp(a-b-) is associated with chronic granulomatus disease (CGD), an inherited defect in the bacterial capacity of neutrophils. Antibodies to Kell system antigens are IgG. Named for the family of the antibody producer Mrs. Kellacher.


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The Lewis System
This system was focuses on a single locus with two antigens, Le a and Le b. These antigens do not form an integral part of the red cell membrane, but are soluble antigens which may be present in body fluids and secretions. They are adsorbed on to the surface of red cells if they are present in the plasma in sufficient amounts. There are only three phenotypes: Le(a-b-); Le(a+b-); and Le(a-b+). Lewis phenotypes may change during pregnancy. Examples of Le(a+b+) are only transient. Lewis antibodies are only found in Le(a-b-) individuals, and are almost entirely IgM. They are the only Blood group antibodies which have never been implicated in HDN (hemolytic disease of the newborn.)


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The Duffy System
The Duffy system is also a single locus with two antigens, Fy a and Fy b. The only rare phenotype is Fy(a-b-), which has a higher frequency in countries where there is a high incidence of Plasmodium falciparium malaria. This phenotype gives a degree of immunity to the disease because the malarial parasite requires Duffy antigens to enter the red cells. Duffy antibodies are almost exclusively IgG. This system is named after the family of the antibody producer, Duffy.


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The Kidd (Jk) System
Another single locus system, two antigen system (Jka and Jkb). There are four possible phenotypes: Jk(a-b-); Jk(a+b-); Jk(a-b+); Jk(a+b+). Jk(a-b-) is a rare phenotype. Antibodies to the Kidd antigens are almost exclusively IgG.
Incompatible transfusion or pregnancy can lead to the formation of antibodies to all these Blood groups, if the recipient/mother lacks the relevant antigen. It is possible to detect all red cell antibodies using an antibody detection panel and different detection techniques. (Some antibodies, usually IgM class, react best at room temperature or cooler, and some work best at 37 degrees entigrade). If an antibody is detected in a serum the red cells from that patient are tested for the presence of the antigen. Antigen detection techniques also vary according to the nature of the antibody-antigen interaction. The presence of a particular antibody specifically excludes the patient from carrying that antigen.


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The Rhesus (Rh) System
The Rhesus system is the most important of the other commonly utilized Blood grouping systems. It was discovered by Landsteiner and Weiner in 1940. Their experiment was to produce an antibody to the red cells of the Rhesus monkey in rabbits and guinea pigs, but they discovered that not only did the antibody in the rodents' serum agglutinate the Rhesus monkey red cells, it also agglutinated the red cells of 85% of the human population. If an individual's red cells were clumped together by this antiserum, they were said to have the Rhesus factor on their red cells (i. e. Rh positive). If an individual's cells were not agglutinated by the antiserum, they were said to lack the Rhesus factor (i. e. Rh negative).


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The Fisher System
It is now known that the Rh system is very complex, and our present understanding is based on the Fisher system. There are three genes making up Rhesus antigens: C, D, and E, found on chromosome 1. There are two possible alleles at each locus: c or C; d or D; and e or E. One haplotype consisting of c/C, d/D, e/E is inherited from each parent, and the resulting Rhesus type of the individual depends on their inherited genotype. The haplotypes are given a code as follows in the table below.

Haplotype Fisher System
CDe R1
cDE R2
CDE Rz
cDe Ro
Cde r'
cdE r"
CdE Ry
cde r

If an individual's Rh genotype contains at least one of the C, D, E antigens, they are Rhesus positive. Only individuals with the genotype cde/cde (rr) are Rhesus negative. For Blood transfusion purposes, donors possessing C or E, even in Rh types r'r and r''r are classed as Rh positive. Recipients of Blood transfusions with Rh types r' and r'' should receive Rh negative (rr) Blood. This is to prevent sensitization to Rh antigens and subsequent Rh antibody formation. The most common Rh antibody is anti-D, but it is possible to form antibodies to c, C, e, and E as well, and to form combinations of antibodies. There is no anti-d
http://www.bloodbook.com/type-sys.html
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Pk_#2
09-04-2008, 06:14 PM
Originally Posted by glo
Today I gave blood - and it got me to wonder whether giving blood was Islamically permitted/encouraged?

Foe anybody in the UK, who is interested, here is the official website: http://www.blood.co.uk/

(Foolishly I had not eaten or drunk for several hous before (silly thing to do!), which resulted in me passing out when I sat up after the domantion. One moment I was sitting there, applying pressure to the inside of my elbow ... thinking 'ooh oh, I am feeling a little lightheaded' ... the next moment I am lying back on the stretcher, with three female attendance fluttering around me, patting my cheek, asking my name, wiping up blood. How embarrassing! :-[ That's never happened to me before)
Hi,

What blood type are you?

:thumbs_up & Good girl Lol.
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youngsister
09-10-2008, 10:14 AM
:sl: I would love to give blood but i am scared of needles. :w:
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wildkat
09-11-2008, 01:05 PM
I want to give blood, only thing is I doubt they'd take mine since I'm anaemic and now have to have get my vit D levels checked out... sigh.
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rehmanmajestic
09-11-2008, 03:10 PM
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glo
09-25-2008, 08:15 PM
Originally Posted by wildkat
I want to give blood, only thing is I doubt they'd take mine since I'm anaemic and now have to have get my vit D levels checked out... sigh.
They screen quite carefully before they let you give blood, wildkat.

Don't worry if you cannot give blood. It is probably for your best! If your haemoglobin and vitamin D levels are low, then you probably don't want to lose any more of it. :)
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Grofica
02-06-2010, 02:26 PM
I usually give plasma because you can donate it a lot more often then blood...

(thats where they take out your blood and then put the blood cells back in and just keep the clear stuff....) you can do it twice a week or every 3 days or soemthing like that.... unfortunatly the needles are a little bigger.... i have huge holes in my arm from them. fortuatly i have huge veins... :-)
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sunmonkey
02-17-2010, 01:53 AM
Everyone should give blood if they can. :)
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smile
02-17-2010, 03:28 PM
i give blood
most of the blood is given to mother who gave birth!!!!
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