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Grace Seeker
10-22-2008, 03:17 PM
I wasn't sure whether to post this here or in comparative religion, so if the mods think it is out of place here, please move it accordingly. But I decided on posting here as I wasn't interested in a debate between what is right or wrong, should or shouldn't be, but was more interested in learning just what is.




I would like to know how you see your faith or religion (whatever it is or isn't) impacting the way you vote (assuming you live in a democracy where you have the opportunity to vote. Do you consider a candidate's faith in determining whether to vote for the person or not, and how much weight do you give it?

Also, if you were to be president of the United States (laws are changed to make all of you eligible for that office, but the rest of the reality of the country remains as is) how would your religious views impact the way you would govern? Are there any specific things that you would do because of your religious views that are unrelated to your political views?
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Amadeus85
10-22-2008, 10:27 PM
I dont vote for the Left because they are destructive and nihilist and they destroy every western nation that they rule. Under the smooth words of division between state and church they fight with the religon indeed. They support abortion, euthanasia and legalization of gay/lesbian relationships. They open borders of our countries to let in hundred thousands of aliens to get their votes in future and to destroy the traditional structure of the nation. Yes, faith plays a role in my voting decision.
If I was a president of USA I would make a law which states that a marriage can be only between one man and one woman, I would also make abortion illegal. These are the things that came up to my mind just by now. Ok and now who's gonna vote for me huh?
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Woodrow
10-22-2008, 10:50 PM
I think it does. It may not seem that way but our decisions are based to a large extent upon our faith or lack of faith.

Just for example I think all people of any Abrahamic faith would not be able to enforce legislation that provided for abortion upon demand. While some faiths such as Shintoism would see no harm in it and be able to enforce such legislation with no problems.
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brotherinfaith
10-22-2008, 11:08 PM
i would say that i will consider faith to be the major thing in deciding for whom i will vote and that is just one side because not all faithfuls are good to be elected and become heads of nations so there are other factors which i will take into concideration but the most important factor is faith that's why i don't vote as the majority of those who say candidates are hypocrites and liars who want just fam and money.
in our religion any king or president is considered to be a servant of god and he should know that this earth belongs to god so he has to rule it with god's laws that's why i don't think i will accept most of man made laws if i am elected president so i don't expect to be elected lol
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Grace Seeker
10-27-2008, 07:05 PM
Beyond the invitation, or lack thereof, that they might get to speak at the annual meeting of the Christian Coalition, what difference do you think there would be between how a conservative Christian and a conservative Muslim (assuming both to be equally patriotic and of the same poltiical ideaology) might govern if elected President of the United States (or your own country's national leader if you are unfamiliar with the American system of government)?
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barney
10-30-2008, 01:31 PM
If the British political parties were to any significant extent affected by religion, I'd stay in bed on polling day.
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The Khan
10-30-2008, 03:12 PM
Isn't 45% of Britain irreligious?

My family used to keep switching votes between the Telegu Desam Party and Congress. We wanted nothing to do with the Majlis Ittehadul Muslimeen due to their roots from the Razakar movement, which led to the downfall of the Nizamate of Hyderabad. Although my family was highly supportive of the Razakar movement initially, they became against it later on as Hyderabad was annexed by India.

A while back, my father sought help from Asaduddin Owaisi, the MP of Hyderabad, who's now the leader of the Majlis Ittehadul Muslimeen. My father is involved in a lot of court cases, regarding property disputes (way too common here >_>). Mr Owaisi didn't hesitate to help us, and will immediately help any Muslim who seeks help from him. We immediately switched loyalty to the MIM, not because it's a Muslim party, but because they helped us when we were in need.

So no, religious ideology doesn't matter for me. What I want is a good leader. He must prove his worth before you decide to vote for him and not make false promises.
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IbnAbdulHakim
10-30-2008, 03:19 PM
i vote for anyone who sympathises most with islamic values even if he is not a muslim (this is due to the "lesser of the two evils" rule) and if i was in power Allah knows best what i would do, but i hope i would implement shariah law, and govern the world in that manner.
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czgibson
10-30-2008, 03:43 PM
Greetings,

I agree with barney. The British political parties know that if they make overt claims of religiosity large sections of the public will think they are crazy and not vote for them. Harsh, but that's the way it is.

Tony Blair was incredibly cautious with the way he publically talked about his own religious beliefs. His chief spin doctor, Alastair Campbell famously silenced interviewers with the phrase "We don't do God." However, shortly after Blair stepped down, he converted to Catholicism openly. It would have been politically damaging for him to have done that while still in office.

Originally Posted by The Khan
Isn't 45% of Britain irreligious?
It's very difficult to tell. Many people will say they are members of the Church of England if asked by pollsters, even if they never go to church or think about Jesus. Any religious statistic should be treated with the utmost caution.

Most of the people I know are not religious. I've even taught in supposedly 'Christian' schools where most of the staff did not believe in god. I'm pretty sure that levels of public religiosity are lower in the UK than in many parts of the US. The popularity of creationism over there is not something that I think is likely to happen in Britain.

Peace
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Keltoi
10-31-2008, 08:59 PM
Originally Posted by czgibson
Greetings,

Tony Blair was incredibly cautious with the way he publically talked about his own religious beliefs. His chief spin doctor, Alastair Campbell famously silenced interviewers with the phrase "We don't do God." However, shortly after Blair stepped down, he converted to Catholicism openly. It would have been politically damaging for him to have done that while still in office.
Is it still controversial to be Catholic in England? I know that the Howard family didn't confess they stayed Catholic until the 1960's.
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barney
10-31-2008, 10:11 PM
Originally Posted by czgibson
I've even taught in supposedly 'Christian' schools where most of the staff did not believe in god.
Peace
My son is in a Cof E school that takes its religion very seriously,even so the latest RE project is for the kids to put in their favorite superheros and they were encouraged to put Jesus in the list :rollseyes

My son managed a good un though. In the box where he was asked to comment on how all these superhero's were alike he put, "they dont exist":thumbs_up
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wth1257
11-01-2008, 04:59 AM
Originally Posted by Aaron85
I dont vote for the Left because they are destructive and nihilist and they destroy every western nation that they rule. Under the smooth words of division between state and church they fight with the religon indeed. They support abortion, euthanasia and legalization of gay/lesbian relationships. They open borders of our countries to let in hundred thousands of aliens to get their votes in future and to destroy the traditional structure of the nation. Yes, faith plays a role in my voting decision.
If I was a president of USA I would make a law which states that a marriage can be only between one man and one woman, I would also make abortion illegal. These are the things that came up to my mind just by now. Ok and now who's gonna vote for me huh?
The US President does not have the power to do any of those things by himself:D
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AntiKarateKid
11-01-2008, 05:45 AM
If faith plays such an important role in every decision I make, it would definitely be the major factor in politics too.


I honestly can't imagine any serious and practicing Jew, Christian, or Muslim agreeing with the whole "separation of Church and State" garbage.

Could anyone who really believes in their holy book actually say that they would not govern by it?

Governer: Thanks for the moral rules God, but I'm gonna have to pass on your legal rules. Dont get me wrong! I know that you are omnipotent and omnicient but I really think we should govern another way. No,no it's not you, its me. Still friends?
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KAding
11-01-2008, 11:11 AM
Originally Posted by AntiKarateKid
I honestly can't imagine any serious and practicing Jew, Christian, or Muslim agreeing with the whole "separation of Church and State" garbage.

Could anyone who really believes in their holy book actually say that they would not govern by it?
"Give to Caesar what belongs to Caesar, and give to God what belongs to God" (Matthew 22:21)

It's a bit of a stretch if you look at the context, but nevertheless that is why many believe the concept of separation of church and state was ever allowed to surface in the West.

Besides, there is no thing like "Christian Law", like there is Islamic law. Being "governed by it" is a more difficult exercise, which hasn't been a success when it was tried in the past.
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mediadave
11-01-2008, 05:38 PM
I agree with barney. The British political parties know that if they make overt claims of religiosity large sections of the public will think they are crazy and not vote for them. Harsh, but that's the way it is.
That is true, but I think the parties are more 'religious' than their spin doctors would try to project - probably the opposite of the situation in the US. The conservatives are openly saying faith/charity initiaties should take over much state welfare and generally moan about the decline of reliosity. On the labour side, christian socialism is a major part of the Labour coalition, especially in the 'old labour' contingent. Though Blair was -openly in private- religious, Gordon 'Son of the Manse' Brown has talked about his religion and what it means to his politics in speeches, including both conference speeches and his speech to the Israeli Knesset.
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Keltoi
11-01-2008, 07:32 PM
Originally Posted by KAding
"Give to Caesar what belongs to Caesar, and give to God what belongs to God" (Matthew 22:21)

It's a bit of a stretch if you look at the context, but nevertheless that is why many believe the concept of separation of church and state was ever allowed to surface in the West.

Besides, there is no thing like "Christian Law", like there is Islamic law. Being "governed by it" is a more difficult exercise, which hasn't been a success when it was tried in the past.
There has never been a Christian theocracy unless you consider the Puritan settlements in the New World to have been a theocracy, and you could make that case.

Christianity in Europe was used as a way for kings and queens to justify their legitimacy, but the law was the monarch.
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aamirsaab
11-07-2008, 09:36 AM
:sl:
Does your faith effect the way you would govern

If it governs every part of my life, then it would definitely affect the way I would govern. So, YES is my answer.

This being said, I don't particularly like politics as a whole so rest assured I won't be running for prime minister or president :)
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Trumble
11-08-2008, 08:42 AM
Originally Posted by aamirsaab
:sl:

If it governs every part of my life, then it would definitely affect the way I would govern. So, YES is my answer.
Quite true. There is a difference, though, between that and forcing your own moral opinions on others through legislation as is suggested in the context of abortion (which is a serious moral issue, unlike the homophobic nonsense regarding gay 'marriages'). I am opposed to abortion, but I do not believe that would give me the right to force that position on others by banning it. Partially that in itself is a 'religious' position, as I believe it inevitable that people must eventually experience the consequences of their own actions, good or bad.
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aamirsaab
11-08-2008, 08:49 AM
Originally Posted by Trumble
Quite true. There is a difference, though, between that and forcing your own moral opinions on others through legislation as is suggested in the context of abortion (which is a serious moral issue, unlike the homophobic nonsense regarding gay 'marriages'). I am opposed to abortion, but I do not believe that would give me the right to force that position on others by banning it. Partially that in itself is a 'religious' position, as I believe it inevitable that people must eventually experience the consequences of their own actions, good or bad.
That's exactly the reason I don't want to go into politics - I'd find it too difficult to seperate myself from Islam or to say ''no'' to Islam under those situations - especially in regards to abortion and stuff. (Though, I should say that there is a fair bit of leway given in Islamic rule)
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