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north_malaysian
11-23-2008, 11:23 AM
Fatwa Council deems ancient form of exercise from India 'haram' for Muslims

BY MAZWIN NIK ANIS

PUTRAJAYA: The National Fatwa Council has declared that yoga is haram (prohibited) in Islam and Muslims are banned from practising it.

Its chairman Datuk Dr Abdul Shukor Husin said yoga had been practised by the Hindu community for thousands of years and incorporated physical movements, religious elements together with chants and worshipping, with the aim of “being one with God”.

“Because of this, we believe that it is inappropriate for Muslims to do yoga. The council is declaring that practising yoga, when it comes together with the three elements, is haram,” he told a press conference here yesterday.

He noted that while merely doing the physical movements of yoga without the worshipping and chanting might not be against religious beliefs, Muslims should avoid practising it altogether as “doing one part of yoga would lead to another”.

Muslims, he said, were discouraged from practising yoga even as a form of exercise as it would ultimately lead to worshipping and chanting, which is against Islam.

Inappropriate for Muslims?: A yoga practitioner going through the ‘crow’ asana, one of the more advanced postures, at a yoga centre in Kuala Lumpur Saturday. Malaysia’s top Islamic body has ruled that because the physical exercise contained elements of Hinduism, it could corrupt Muslims. — AP

“In Islam, a believer must not do things that can erode one’s aqidah or faith. Doing yoga, even just the physical movements, is a step towards erosion of one’s faith in the religion, hence Muslims should avoid it,” he said.

Shukor said that once the fatwa was gazetted, it would be up to the state governments to implement and enforce the ruling as religious affairs come under their purview.

“Malaysia is not the only country which prohibits Muslims from doing yoga. Singapore and Egypt have come out with the same edict,” he pointed out.
The council, he said, came up with an edict on yoga as the matter was referred to it following growing concerns whether it would be against the religion if Muslims continued with the exercise.

Recently, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia’s Islamic Studies Centre lecturer Prof Zakaria Stapa advised Muslims who had taken up yoga to stop practising it for fear that they could deviate from the teachings of Islam.

Shukor said the declaration of yoga as haram was done after serious and in-depth discussions among the council members who met last month.
He said that after studying the matter, including the history and purpose of yoga, the council decided that it was inappropriate for Muslims as it could affect one’s faith.

Asked if the decision would draw flak within the Malaysian community, including the non-Muslims, he said the ruling was only meant for Muslims. The rest were free to practise yoga.

He said Muslims must be careful not to do anything that could erode their faith, adding the religion strongly advocates “prevention is better than cure”.

“There are many other forms of exercise that Muslims can partake in, especially when the religion promotes healthy living and lifestyle.

Performing prayers, for example, is a good form of exercise,” he said.

Source: http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp...876&sec=nation
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north_malaysian
11-23-2008, 11:29 AM
Mixed reactions to yoga ban

PETALING JAYA: Sisters in Islam (SIS) and several yoga practitioners have expressed disappointment with the National Fatwa Council’s edict yesterday prohibiting Muslims from practising yoga.

They maintained that yoga was just a form of exercise.

Other individuals, however, said they would adhere to the edict.

Sisters in Islam (SIS) programme manager Norhayati Kaprawi said many Muslims in Malaysia practised it as a form of exercise to stay healthy.

“I don’t think it has caused any Muslim to convert to Hinduism, neither has it weakened their faith. It’s just an exercise like qigong or taichi which has its roots in Buddhism.

Norhayati said that by issuing the edict, the council had acted as if yoga was a widespread threat to Islam.

“I hope they can focus their attention on bigger and more pressing issues, such as money politics and corruption. Isn’t that more serious?” she asked.

She noted that SIS had been holding weekly yoga classes for their staff for the past year, adding that it had no problems continuing with it.

The council declared that yoga, which involves elements of physical movements, worshipping and chanting as haram in Islam and Muslims are banned from practising it.

Yoga teacher Datin Siti Suheila Merican agreed that while yoga practice should not involve worshipping and chanting, the physical movements were good for improving health.

Siti Suheila, who has been teaching yoga for the past 30 years, said the issue should not be blown out of proportion as many Muslims in the Middle East were doing it without any fuss.

“Worldwide it has been accepted as an exercise for health benefits.

“It is a science of health that is time-tested and proven scientifically to be extremely effective. Many doctors in the West recommend yoga as an alternative therapy to medication,” she said.

M. Revathi, 40, who has been teaching yoga part-time for about 10 years, said some people mistook the names of the asanas (postures) as religious verses as they were in Sanskrit “but there’s nothing religious about the names.”

“As for the meditation part, it’s not religious either. I tell my students to relax and free their minds, and they can meditate in whatever language they like,” she said.

A doctor, who only wanted to be identified as Rafidah, said she had been attending yoga lessons once or twice a week for the past six months but would quit her classes now to adhere to the edict.

“I still don’t feel that it has changed my faith in Islam at all. My faith as a Muslim is the same as before,” the disappointed 27-year-old said.

However, she believed that the council had conducted the necessary research and knew more about Islam than she did.

Another yoga practitioner, who only identified herself as Siti, said she would stop doing yoga.

“I think it’s fine for beginners but as I went for more advanced classes, I did not feel comfortable. I think I’ll take up pilates now instead as it is purely exercise,” she said.

http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp...368&sec=nation
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north_malaysian
11-23-2008, 11:33 AM
Hindu Sangam urges Fatwa Council to ‘be more sensitive’

PETALING JAYA: The National Fatwa Council must respect the sensitivities and feelings of other religions in Malaysia while giving guidance to Muslims on the religion’s practices and tenets.

“Many Hindus have been deeply disturbed by the Fatwa Council’s announcement,” Malaysia Hindu Sangam president Datuk A. Vaithilingam said in a statement Sunday.

He said it was regrettable that the Council had not consulted with the Malaysia Hindu Sangam first so that the religious and non-religious aspects of yoga could have been explained.

The Fatwa Council on Saturday issued an edict banning Muslims from practising yoga on grounds that it involved chants and acts of worship in order to be one with the god of another religion.

“To call this ancient practice ‘haram’ and saying that it can ‘corrupt’ a person is very hurtful and demeaning,” said Vaithilingam.

He added that as many Hindus and non-Hindus practised yoga together in a non-religious manner, the fatwa could drive a wedge between those of different religions.

National Fatwa Council chairman Datuk Dr Abdul Shukor Husin on Saturday said yoga had been practised by the Hindu community for thousands of years and incorporated physical movements, religious elements together with chants and worshipping, with the aim of “being one with God”.

“Because of this, we believe that it is inappropriate for Muslims to do yoga. The council is declaring that practising yoga, when it comes together with the three elements, is haram,” he told a press conference.

http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp...330&sec=nation
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syilla
11-24-2008, 02:09 AM
:salamext:

“To call this ancient practice ‘haram’ and saying that it can ‘corrupt’ a person is very hurtful and demeaning,” said Vaithilingam.
It is haraam because of muslims aqeedah... nothing to do about physical or harming anyone... *sigh.

If any muslims really learn the YOGA the significance and the name of YOGA they'll understand... just watching the tamil movies you can also understand why it is haram.
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north_malaysian
11-24-2008, 04:02 AM
Muslims can change yoga to pilate ...
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Muslim Knight
11-24-2008, 08:14 AM
Originally Posted by north_malaysian
Muslims can change yoga to pilate ...
or Qi Gong. No mantra or chanting there. Only concentrating on internal energy.

The National Fatwa Council can do Muslims a favor by explaining in detail for its decision to ban Yoga, and Hindu Sanggam can shut it's rattle trap for commenting on a decision that only concerns Muslims.
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K.Venugopal
11-24-2008, 12:09 PM
Yoga that is universally taught and practiced is of the entry level, properly called hatha-yoga, which are exercises and callisthenics for the benefit of the body. But if you go deeper into yoga, it unfolds the science of self-discovery. Islam would be uncomfortable with anything to do with self-discovery because Islam is about discovery of Allah and Allah is considered separate from the self. Therefore from the Islamic point of view, if Yoga is restricted to hatha-yoga, it would in no way contradict Islam. If the poses are named in Sanskrit, they can always be translated into Arabic, to be more Islamic friendly. And mantras, which is yet another Hindu science, need not be recited at all while doing Yoga. Last but not least - would someone from this Forum please come up with an Arabic name for yoga? Might be difficult, for Yoga means – uniting with God.
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K.Venugopal
11-24-2008, 12:20 PM
Originally Posted by Muslim Knight
or Qi Gong. No mantra or chanting there. Only concentrating on internal energy.

The National Fatwa Council can do Muslims a favor by explaining in detail for its decision to ban Yoga, and Hindu Sanggam can shut it's rattle trap for commenting on a decision that only concerns Muslims.
Surely, if the Fatwa is about Yoga, which is a Hindu heritage, it is only natural for Hindus to comment. Using phrases like "shut it's rattle trap" is undignified language.
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doorster
11-24-2008, 12:36 PM
Originally Posted by K.Venugopal
Surely, if the Fatwa is about Yoga, which is a Hindu heritage, it is only natural for Hindus to comment. Using phrases like "shut it's rattle trap" is undignified language.
http://www.islamicboard.com/1051018-post9.html
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Muslim Knight
11-24-2008, 01:51 PM
Originally Posted by K.Venugopal
Last but not least - would someone from this Forum please come up with an Arabic name for yoga? Might be difficult, for Yoga means – uniting with God.

So you see, that's exactly the justification for the Malaysian National Fatwa Council to ban Yoga from being practiced by Muslims! You can argue for all it's worth that Yoga is good for health et cetera et cetera but from your own explanation, Yoga = uniting from God, is against core principle of Islam, that is, though we are all created by Allah, He stands separate from His creations!


Originally Posted by K.Venugopal
Surely, if the Fatwa is about Yoga, which is a Hindu heritage, it is only natural for Hindus to comment. Using phrases like "shut it's rattle trap" is undignified language.
So busying oneself into the affairs of other religion is "dignified"? Like I said before, this decision only affects Muslims (and in particular, in Malaysia) and not any Hindu the slightest.
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suffiyan007
11-24-2008, 04:29 PM
i had read bout muslim prohibited yoga in generals...if practice Qi Qong...mean there maintain our yin and yang...but in Yoga either form of execise or form of meditation...which mean actually no harm,you dont need to recite the mantras or what...is that practise yoga mean that the people will curse by syaitan...cause the yoga inside has been recite the mantras even we dont recite mantras..why we have lotsa form of exercise like YoGa,pilate and Qi Qong,is to balanced our yin and yang..and we concentrated the breaths and relax our nervous...practise traditional exercise doesnt harm...and even Tai chi...! why will yoga will be haram...? is just how to stretch your muscle and tendon exercise and be calm when u learn how to do Yoga.i know yoga is part of india traditional exercise but doesnt mean to be haram....lotsa people wanna practise Yoga in Yoga Classes is because the Yoga is unique exercise which mean no one can do yoga if they dont attend the classes...is how to learn how to make our body to become flexibility and be able do all kind of body stretching..and well being.
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doorster
11-24-2008, 05:34 PM
Originally Posted by Suffiyan007
i had read bout muslim prohibited yoga in generals...if practice Qi Qong...mean there maintain our yin and yang...but in Yoga either form of execise or form of meditation...which mean actually no harm,you dont need to recite the mantras or what...is that practise yoga mean that the people will curse by syaitan...cause the yoga inside has been recite the mantras even we dont recite mantras..why we have lotsa form of exercise like YoGa,pilate and Qi Qong,is to balanced our yin and yang..and we concentrated the breaths and relax our nervous...practise traditional exercise doesnt harm...and even Tai chi...! why will yoga will be haram...? is just how to stretch your muscle and tendon exercise and be calm when u learn how to do Yoga.i know yoga is part of india traditional exercise but doesnt mean to be haram....lotsa people wanna practise Yoga in Yoga Classes is because the Yoga is unique exercise which mean no one can do yoga if they dont attend the classes...is how to learn how to make our body to become flexibility and be able do all kind of body stretching..and well being.
5 daily salats are not enough of an alternative for you to mantain bodily flexibility?

"there are many other forms of exercise that Muslims can take part in to promote healthy lifestyle,You can go cycling, swimming and eat less food to stay slim"

and there are better forms of Martial Arts too where you do not need to worship the instructors
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Amadeus85
11-24-2008, 10:21 PM
The Pope warned catholics not to read Harry Potter, so I understand the decision of malay muslim council. Its the job of the religious authorities to say such things.
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north_malaysian
11-25-2008, 01:43 AM
I am wondering about one thing.... this is banned for MUSLIMS only... why the OTHERS are so OVER-REACTED....

Muslims are banned from eating pork because God says so... any non-Muslims want to go against this decision too?
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north_malaysian
11-25-2008, 01:45 AM
in fact, 2 states (Selangor, Perak) are studying whether they would gazzette this fatwa and the Mufti of Perlis said that the secular yoga should be excluded from this fatwa...
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north_malaysian
11-25-2008, 01:48 AM
Yoga fatwa on hold

PETALING JAYA: The implementation of the fatwa (edict) banning the practice of yoga by Muslims has been put on hold in two states.

> The Sultan of Selangor said the fatwa could not be implemented in the state yet as it had not been presented to the state Fatwa Committee,

> Perak Islamic Religious Department director Datuk Jamry Sury withdrew his earlier statement that Perak would adopt the fatwa, saying that several procedures including seeking the consent of the Sultan, had to be carried out first,

> Perlis Mufti Dr Asri Zainal Abidin spoke out against the edict, saying yoga with the non-Muslim elements removed should be allowed,

> Most other states said they would take the necessary steps to enable the edict to be implemented,

> However, Sisters in Islam said the fact that the states had differing views on the matter seemed to suggest that there was no consensus on the ban.

http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp...425&sec=nation
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north_malaysian
11-25-2008, 01:50 AM
Give alternative version of yoga, says Perlis Mufti

KUALA LUMPUR: Perlis Mufti Dr Asri Zainul Abidin said the National Fatwa Council should have offered an alternative version of yoga instead of banning Muslims from practising the ancient form of exercise.

He pointed out that many other sports activities like tai chi, judo and taekwondo were picked up from other cultures.

“These sports did not have anything to do with Islam but have been practised because of its known health benefits,” he said in a telephone interview with Mstar yesterday.

“Yoga practitioners who are Muslims should be given an alternative by practising a version of yoga that does not resemble the version practised by other religions,” he said, adding that chanting while practising the exercise should also be stripped.

He maintained that yoga was a good exercise to maintain a healthy lifestyle if done minus the extra bits that are against Islamic teachings.

Dr Asri is believed to have not attended the National Fatwa Council’s meeting on the edict on yoga because he felt uncomfortable with the discrimination by Department of Islamic Development Malaysia (Jakim) and its director against his views on an alternative solution.

“The fatwa (edict) announced in this day and age should not be too rigid. The human movement does not necessarily have a connection with religion,” he said.

http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp...011&sec=nation
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doorster
11-25-2008, 05:19 AM
Originally Posted by north_malaysian
Give alternative version of yoga, says Perlis Mufti
tell him that there already is an alternative in existence, it is known as Salat!

:w:
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north_malaysian
11-25-2008, 05:49 AM
Originally Posted by doorster
tell him that there already is, it is known as Salat!

:w:
that's what being commented by many religious figures... :D
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suffiyan007
11-25-2008, 04:07 PM
if yoga is in fatwa, but how about china...like acrobatic...similar to yoga..! and the gymnastic....????
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Danah
11-25-2008, 04:20 PM
okay I have question: if there are elements that go against Islam, cant we remove them and still practice Yoga?
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K.Venugopal
11-25-2008, 04:21 PM
What gave Yoga the honour of a fatwa is that it is connected to Hinduism. No other forms of exercise are connected to a religion as yoga is. Yoga has been proscribed by some Christian denominations or communities. This only indicates that yoga is gaining popularity and some people feel threatened. Somewhat misplaced, I would say.
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suffiyan007
11-25-2008, 04:54 PM
Yoga
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For other uses, such as Hatha Yoga or Yoga postures, see Yoga (disambiguation)
Statue of Shiva performing Yogic meditation in the Padmasana posture.

Yoga (Sanskrit: योग, IAST: yóga, IPA: [joːgə]) refers to traditional physical and mental disciplines originating in India; to the goal achieved by those disciplines; and to one of the six orthodox (āstika) schools of Hindu philosophy.[1][2]

Major branches of yoga include Raja Yoga, Karma Yoga, Jnana Yoga, Bhakti Yoga, and Hatha Yoga.[3][4][5] Raja Yoga, compiled in the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, and known simply as yoga in the context of Hindu philosophy, is part of the Samkhya tradition.[6] Many other Hindu texts discuss aspects of yoga, including the Vedas, Upanishads, the Bhagavad Gita, the Hatha Yoga Pradipika, the Shiva Samhita and various Tantras.

The Sanskrit word yoga has many meanings,[7] and is derived from the Sanskrit root yuj, meaning "to control", "to yoke" or "to unite".[8] Translations include "joining", "uniting", "union", "conjunction", and "means".[9][10][11] Outside India, the term yoga is typically associated with Hatha Yoga and its asanas (postures) or as a form of exercise. A practitioner of Yoga is called a Yogi (gender neutral) or Yogini (feminine form).
Contents
[hide]

* 1 History of yoga
o 1.1 Yoga Sutras of Patanjali
o 1.2 Bhagavad Gita
o 1.3 Hatha Yoga
* 2 Yoga practices in other traditions
o 2.1 Yoga and Sufism
o 2.2 Yoga and Buddhism
+ 2.2.1 Yogacara Buddhism
+ 2.2.2 Ch'an (Seon/Zen) Buddhism
+ 2.2.3 Tibetan Buddhism
o 2.3 Yoga and Islam
o 2.4 Yoga and Tantra
* 3 Goal of yoga
* 4 See also
* 5 References
* 6 Further reading
* 7 External links

[edit] History of yoga

Main article: History of yoga

While the most ancient mystic practices are vaguely hinted at in the Vedas, the ascetic practices (tapas) are referenced in the Brāhmaṇas (900 BCE and 500 BCE),[12] early commentaries on the Vedas. The Rig Veda, earliest of the Hindu scripture mentions the practice.[13] Certainly breath control and curbing the mind was practiced since the Vedic times.[14] Popular yoga writer Georg Feuerstein believes that yoga was fundamental to Vedic ritual, especially to chanting the sacred hymns.[15]

In the Upanishads, an early reference to meditation is made in Brihadaranyaka Upanishad,[16] one of the earliest Upanishads (approx. 900 BCE). The main textual sources for the evolving concept of Yoga are the middle Upanishads, (ca. 400 BCE), the Mahabharata (5th c. BCE) including the Bhagavad Gita (ca. 200 BCE), and the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali (300 BCE-200 BCE). Several seals discovered at Indus Valley Civilization (c. 3300–1700 BC) sites depict figures in a yoga- or meditation-like posture, "a form of ritual discipline, suggesting a precursor of yoga" that point to Harappan devotion to "ritual discipline and concentration", according to Archaeologist Gregory Possehl.[17]

[edit] Yoga Sutras of Patanjali

Main articles: Raja Yoga and Yoga Sutras of Patanjali

In Indian philosophy, Yoga is the name of one of the six orthodox philosophical schools.[18][19] The Yoga philosophical system is closely allied with the Samkhya school.[20] The Yoga school as expounded by Patanjali accepts the Samkhya psychology and metaphysics, but is more theistic than the Samkhya, as evidenced by the addition of a divine entity to the Samkhya's twenty-five elements of reality.[21][22] The parallels between Yoga and Samkhya were so close that Max Müller says that "the two philosophies were in popular parlance distinguished from each other as Samkhya with and Samkhya without a Lord...."[23] The intimate relationship between Samkhya and Yoga is explained by Heinrich Zimmer:

These two are regarded in India as twins, the two aspects of a single discipline. Sāṅkhya provides a basic theoretical exposition of human nature, enumerating and defining its elements, analyzing their manner of co-operation in a state of bondage (bandha), and describing their state of disentanglement or separation in release (mokṣa), while Yoga treats specifically of the dynamics of the process for the disentanglement, and outlines practical techniques for the gaining of release, or 'isolation-integration' (kaivalya).[24]

The sage Patanjali is widely regarded as the founder of the formal Yoga philosophy.[25] Patanjali's yoga is known as Raja yoga, which is a system for control of the mind.[26] Patanjali defines the word "yoga" in his second sutra,[27] which is the definitional sutra for his entire work:

योग: चित्त-वृत्ति निरोध:
( yogaś citta-vṛtti-nirodhaḥ )
- Yoga Sutras 1.2

This terse definition hinges on the meaning of three Sanskrit terms. I. K. Taimni translates it as "Yoga is the inhibition (nirodhaḥ) of the modifications (vṛtti) of the mind (citta)".[28] Swami Vivekananda translates the sutra as "Yoga is restraining the mind-stuff (Citta) from taking various forms (Vrittis)."[29]
A sculpture of a Hindu yogi in the Birla Mandir, Delhi

Patanjali's writing also became the basis for a system referred to as "Ashtanga Yoga" ("Eight-Limbed Yoga"). This eight-limbed concept derived from the 29th Sutra of the 2nd book, and is a core characteristic of practically every Raja yoga variation taught today. The Eight Limbs are:

(1) Yama (The five "abstentions"): non-violence, non-lying, non-covetousness, non-sensuality, and non-possessiveness.
(2) Niyama (The five "observances"): purity, contentment, austerity, study, and surrender to god.
(3) Asana: Literally means "seat", and in Patanjali's Sutras refers to the seated position used for meditation.
(4) Pranayama ("Lengthening Prāna"): Prāna, life force, or vital energy, particularly, the breath, "āyāma", to lengthen or extend. Also interpreted as control of prana.
(5) Pratyahara ("Abstraction"): Withdrawal of the sense organs from external objects.
(6) Dharana ("Concentration"): Fixing the attention on a single object.
(7) Dhyana ("Meditation"): Intense contemplation of the nature of the object of meditation.
(8) Samādhi ("Liberation"): merging consciousness with the object of meditation.

[edit] Bhagavad Gita

Main article: Bhagavad Gita

The Bhagavad Gita ('Song of the Lord'), uses the term yoga extensively in a variety of ways. In addition to an entire chapter (ch. 6) dedicated to traditional yoga practice, including meditation,[30] it introduces three prominent types of yoga:[31]

* Karma yoga: The yoga of action
* Bhakti yoga: The yoga of devotion
* Jnana yoga: The yoga of knowledge

Madhusudana Sarasvati (b. circa 1490) divided the Gita into three sections, with the first six chapters dealing with Karma yoga, the middle six with Bhakti yoga, and the last six with Jnana (knowledge).[32] Other commentators ascribe a different 'yoga' to each chapter, delineating eighteen different yogas.[33]

[edit] Hatha Yoga

Main articles: Hatha yoga and Hatha Yoga Pradipika

Hatha Yoga is a particular system of Yoga described by Yogi Swatmarama, compiler of the Hatha Yoga Pradipika in 15th century India. Hatha Yoga differs substantially from the Raja Yoga of Patanjali in that it focuses on shatkarma, the purification of the physical body as leading to the purification of the mind (ha), and prana, or vital energy (tha).[34][35] Compared to the seated asana, or sitting meditation posture, of Patanjali's Raja yoga,[36] it marks the development of asanas (plural) as full body 'postures' now in popular usage.[37]

Hatha Yoga in its many modern variations is the style that many people associate with the word "Yoga" today.[38] Because its emphasis is on the body through asana and pranayama practice, many western students are satisfied with the physical health and vitality it develops and are not interested in the other seven limbs of the Raja Yoga tradition.[citation needed]

[edit] Yoga practices in other traditions

Although Yoga has basically been a Hindu practice, its elements have crept throughout the world and major religions like Buddhism, Jainism, Sufism, all being mystic religions, have embraced the practice as being a holy one.

[edit] Yoga and Sufism

The development of Sufism was considerably influenced by Indian yogic practises, where they adapted both physical postures (asanas) and breath control (pranayama).[39] The ancient Indian yogic text, Amritakunda, ("Pool of Nectar)" was translated into Arabic and Persian as early as the 11th century. [40]

[edit] Yoga and Buddhism

Main article: Yoga and Buddhism

Yoga is intimately connected to the religious beliefs and practices of the Indian religions.[41] The influence of Yoga is also visible in Buddhism, a descendant of Hinduism, which is distinguished by its austerities, spiritual exercises, and trance states.[42][43]

[edit] Yogacara Buddhism

Yogacara (Sanskrit: "Practice of Yoga [Union]"[44] ), also spelled yogāchāra, is a school of philosophy and psychology that developed in India during the 4th to 5th centuries.

Yogacara received the name as it provided a yoga, a framework for engaging in the practices that lead to the path of the bodhisattva.[45] The Yogacara sect teaches yoga in order to reach enlightenment.[46]

[edit] Ch'an (Seon/Zen) Buddhism

Zen (the name of which derives from the Sanskrit "dhyana" via the Chinese "ch'an"[47]) is a form of Mahayana Buddhism. The Mahayana school of Buddhism is noted for its proximity with Yoga.[43] In the west, Zen is often set alongside Yoga; the two schools of meditation display obvious family resemblances.[48] This phenomenon merits special attention since the Zen Buddhist school of meditation has some of its roots in yogic practices.[49] Certain essential elements of Yoga are important both for Buddhism in general and for Zen in particular.[50]

[edit] Tibetan Buddhism

Yoga is central to Tibetan Buddhism. In the Nyingma tradition, practitioners progress to increasingly profound levels of yoga, starting with Mahā yoga, continuing to Anu yoga and ultimately undertaking the highest practice, Ati yoga. In the Sarma traditions, the Anuttara yoga class is equivalent. Other tantra yoga practices include a system of 108 bodily postures practiced with breath and heart rhythm. Timing in movement exercises is known as Trul khor or union of moon and sun (channel) prajna energies. The body postures of Tibetan ancient yogis are depicted on the walls of the Dalai Lama's summer temple of Lukhang. A semi-popular account of Tibetan Yoga by Chang (1993) refers to Dumo, the generation of heat in one's own body, as being "the very foundation of the whole of Tibetan Yoga" (Chang, 1993, p7). Chang also claims that Tibetan Yoga involves reconciliation of apparent polarities, such as prana and mind, relating this to theoretical implications of tantrism.

[edit] Yoga and Islam

Malaysia's top Islamic body has passed a fatwa against Muslims practicing yoga, saying it had elements of "Hindu spiritual teachings" and could lead to blasphemey and therefore haraam. Muslim yoga teachers in Malaysia have criticized this decision and the fatwa as "insulting". [51] The fatwa was reportedly applied based on the conclusion that terms like asanas used in Yoga are "Hindu" in nature. [52] Ironically, the fatwa actually states that yoga practiced only in its physical exercise form to be permissible; however as explained in the official position paper, yogic spiritual teachings and goals such as annihilation of self and uniting of a human with God is not consistent with Islamic philosophy and faith. [53]. News of the yoga ban prompted criticism from activists and outrage from Yoga practitioners.[54][55]

[edit] Yoga and Tantra

Main article: Tantra

Tantrism is a practice that is supposed to alter the relation of its practitioners to the ordinary social, religious, and logical reality in which they live. Through Tantric practice an individual perceives reality as maya, illusion, and the individual achieves liberation from it.[56] This particular path to salvation among the several offered by Hinduism, links Tantrism to those practices of Indian religions, such as yoga, meditation, and social renunciation, which are based on temporary or permanent withdrawal from social relationships and modes.[56]

During tantric practices and studies, the student is instructed further in meditation technique, particularly chakra meditation. This is often in a limited form in comparison with the way this kind of meditation is known and used by Tantric practitioners and yogis elsewhere, but is more elaborate than the initiate's previous meditation. It is considered to be a kind of Kundalini Yoga for the purpose of moving the Goddess into the chakra located in the "heart," for meditation and worship.[57]

[edit] Goal of yoga

The goal of yoga may range from anywhere between improved health and reaching Moksha.[58] Within the monist schools of Advaita Vedanta and Shaivism the goal of yoga takes the form of Moksha, which is liberation from all worldly suffering and the cycle of birth and death (Samsara), at which point there is a realisation of identity with the Supreme Brahman. In the Mahabharata, the goal of yoga is variously described as entering the world of Brahma, as Brahman, or as perceiving the Brahman or Atman that pervades all things.[59] For the bhakti schools of Vaishnavism, bhakti or service to Svayam bhagavan itself is the ultimate goal of the yoga process, wherein perfection culminates in an eternal relationship with Vishnu, Rama or Krsna.[60]
Reply

doorster
11-25-2008, 05:06 PM
Originally Posted by Suffiyan007
if yoga is in fatwa, but how about china...like acrobatic...similar to yoga..! and the gymnastic....????
first and foremost read and accept or refute >>
http://www.islamicboard.com/general/...ml#post1051104
and
http://www.islamicboard.com/general/...ml#post1051342 only then will I reply to your new questions
Reply

north_malaysian
11-26-2008, 12:54 AM
Yoga had been prohibited by religious authorities in Singapore and Egypt... why no body ever bothered... but when Malaysia did it... it has become everyone's matter...
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AntiKarateKid
11-26-2008, 01:16 AM
I wonder if they can practice it using Islamic mantras instead?
Reply

Takumi
11-26-2008, 01:18 AM
What if the movement in yoga is adapted and we call it another name, say, "silat badan". Is it okay then?

I know that the Malaysian government also had banned many "silat" forms in malaysia.

Other alternatives: Tai chi maybe? Or skateboarding is cool too. :-)
Reply

doorster
11-26-2008, 05:25 AM
what part of "Yoga is synonymous with Hinduism", some of you people are having trouble grasping?
"A Yogi is either one who wants liberation from all worldly suffering and the cycle of birth and death, at which point there is a realisation of identity with the Supreme Brahman (the ultimate Reality or supreme self). In the Mahabharata, the goal of yoga is described as entering the world of Brahma.
or
It is a service to svayam bhagavān (Sanskrit for "The Lord" or Lord Himself),which is the ultimate goal of the yoga process, wherein perfection culminates in an eternal union with hindu trinity or gods Vishnu, Rama or Krsna"
BTW. In Hinduism every living being is Brahman and It is said:"Any one who knows the supreme Brahman becomes Brahman indeed" what better way to find him than to become a yogi? You can read all about it in > Bhagavad-gītā
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Woodrow
11-26-2008, 05:52 AM
Originally Posted by doorster
what part of yoga is synonymous with Hinduism, some of you people are having trouble with grasping?

I agree. Yoga as practiced in it's meaning is an act of devotion and as such would be worshiping a God other then Allaah(swt). Shirk for us Muslims.

The physical aspects of yoga may be beneficial, but to be yoga it extends beyond simple exercise. It is a religious act.

I can see the attraction of it as an exercize. But, true Salat would also give the same benefits. I doubt if any of our Hindu members would substitute our salat for yoga, by the same token we should not substitute yoga for salat or shorten our salat to make time for yoga.

Therein lies the conflict. Not because yoga is wrong, but because it would easily become a path to interfere with our practice of Islam.
Reply

north_malaysian
11-26-2008, 06:42 AM
Originally Posted by Takumi
What if the movement in yoga is adapted and we call it another name, say, "silat badan". Is it okay then?

I know that the Malaysian government also had banned many "silat" forms in malaysia.

Other alternatives: Tai chi maybe? Or skateboarding is cool too. :-)
Silat badan? LOL:D and for every "aum" is substituted with "Allah"? Sounds so sufistic...

One of the famous silat banned in Malaysia is Nasrul Haq.

Tai Chi - cool.....

Skateboarding? Almost all Muslim yoga practicioners are middle age urban women... you want them to skateboarding? :exhausted
Reply

Grace Seeker
11-26-2008, 05:20 PM
I'm enjoying reading this discussion. I see it as an internal matter to the Ummah. You don't need me as an outsider saying this is right or this is wrong for Islam. I guess that is the Council's job and they have done so. But it is also apparent from the discussion that not every Muslim agrees with the council.


Originally Posted by doorster
what part of "Yoga is synonymous with Hinduism", some of you people are having trouble grasping?
I suspect it is the word "synonymous" that people are disputing. At least that is what I read in the above posts. While you may think that because something comes out of a Hindu culture and has elements of Hindu philosophy attached to it at advanced stages that it is therefore synonymous with Hinduism, to use the word "synonymous" means Yoga and Hinduism "have the same or nearly the same meaning." And it seems that many Muslims, faithful Muslims I believe, don't see them as being so synonymous. Thus they may be related, but not being the same, they can also be differentiated. And if they can be differentiated, the question that I see being asked by Muslims of their leadership, why link them? Why not differentiate them and help Muslims be sure not to inappropriately link them.

All Muslims might recognize the importance of not uniting anything with Allah, and perhaps because of Yoga's associations with Hinduism some people might see this as a risk. But one can deal with that risk in two different ways: (1) identifying the risk of assimilating Hindu philosophy that are parts of advanced Yoga practices and teaching people the proper way to practice Yoga as a physical exercise only without any accompanying philosophy; (2) Dismissing the whole practice as being an unnecessary risk. The Fatwa makes it clear that the second way is that which has been chosen by the Muslim leadership in Malaysia.

My only personal comment is that when faced with similar issues, which of the two ways of dealing with a problem I adopt often depends on the people I am dealing with. With adults capable of receiving and processing complex ideas and thoughts, I share the important issues for them to consider with them and then trust them to make decisions appropriate for their own lives. With children I typically decided for them and then try to educate them as to why. The National Council appears to have chosen to treat the entire Muslim population of Malaysia in a way similiar to how I treat children. It doesn't surprise me that some of them are upset.
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north_malaysian
11-27-2008, 04:02 AM
If the Muslims who practice yoga claiming that their yoga thingy has nothing to do with Hinduism, they can meet the various state religious councils and ask for exemptions...

But, when non-Muslims started to protest it... it's way so weird... it has nothing to do with them...
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K.Venugopal
11-27-2008, 04:38 PM
It must also be added here that the word Yoga in Hindu culture is one of its two most important words, the other being Dharma. Dharma means harmony and points to the natural harmony in existence, the maintenance of which in human affairs is taught to be of paramount importance. Yoga means 'integrity' and Hinduism aims at creating wo/men of integrity to ensure that social harmony is capable of being upheld by the members of society. Therefore Yoga is not just one of the key words in Hindu parlance, but is at the very soul of Hinduism alongside the word Dharma.
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doorster
11-27-2008, 04:51 PM
Originally Posted by K.Venugopal
It must also be added here that the word Yoga in Hindu culture is one of its two most important words, the other being Dharma. Dharma means harmony and points to the natural harmony in existence, the maintenance of which in human affairs is taught to be of paramount importance. Yoga means 'integrity' and Hinduism aims at creating wo/men of integrity to ensure that social harmony is capable of being upheld by the members of society. Therefore Yoga is not just one of the key words in Hindu parlance, but is at the very soul of Hinduism alongside the word Dharma.
finally!

Thank you very much!

these are the very words I have been in search of past few day; Yoga is at the very soul of Hinduism.
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alcurad
11-27-2008, 05:18 PM
Originally Posted by Grace Seeker
The National Council appears to have chosen to treat the entire Muslim population of Malaysia in a way similiar to how I treat children. It doesn't surprise me that some of them are upset.
heh, nail on head.
but i don't get how some bros/sis's are comparing yoga to muslim prayer? our prayer I think means much more than yoga, no?
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K.Venugopal
11-27-2008, 05:20 PM
Originally Posted by doorster
finally!

Thank you very much!

these are the very words I have been in search of past few day; Yoga is at the very soul of Hinduism.
Yes, this is a fact. Therefore I understand the fatwa against Yoga following, obviously, its increasing popularity among Malaysian Muslims. But where the fatwa might have erred is probably in supposing that Yoga is a belief system, which Yoga is not. In Yoga you don't have to believe anything. You only have to expose yourself to a knowledge that can transform you into an individual of integrity.

If today a fatwa has been issued against Yoga because of its Hindu connotations, tomorrow a fatwa might be issued against Ayurveda. Ayurveda is a time tested and proven alternative medical system that is gaining popularity throughout the world. Ayurveda is based on the Vedas and its texts are all in Sanskrit.
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doorster
11-27-2008, 05:23 PM
Originally Posted by alcurad
heh, nail on head.
(I never thought that I'll see the day when I start questioning you again after resolving our last argument somewhat amicably)

do you believe that there is room for yoga in Islam when it is at the very soul of another religion?

<Edit>
but i don't get how some bros/sis's are comparing yoga to muslim prayer? our prayer I think means much more than yoga, no?
and likewise to a Hindu yoga is much more than our salat!
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alcurad
11-27-2008, 05:27 PM
bro doorster, I don't think some stretching is harmful to our religion, do you?
now I don't practice it, and I do understand if you think the mantra's/beliefs could get in somehow, but again, if some people want to stretch without the beliefs etc, none of my business.
also, the council said that if yoga is practiced along with the chants and religious elements it is haram, not the physical activity alone.
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doorster
11-27-2008, 05:48 PM
Originally Posted by alcurad
bro doorster, I don't think some stretching is harmful to our religion, do you?
now I don't practice it, and I do understand if you think the mantra's/beliefs could get in somehow, but again, if some people want to stretch without the beliefs etc, none of my business.
also, the council said that if yoga is practiced along with the chants and religious elements it is haram, not the physical activity alone.
It is not the act of stretching that is in dispute but Yoga
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alcurad
11-27-2008, 05:56 PM
meh what's with the signature all ava sudden:)
yeah I get you, stretching is good , the chants and whatnot not so good. what i don't get is how we seem to 'flare up' then kind of agree:)
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doorster
11-27-2008, 05:58 PM
Originally Posted by alcurad
meh what's with the signature all ava sudden:)
yeah I get you, stretching is good , the chants and whatnot not so good. what i don't get is how we seem to 'flare up' then kind of agree:)
what i don't get is how we seem to 'flare up
may be because English is not my first language?
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