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GuestFellow
10-26-2009, 01:17 PM
Children as young as seven are to be offered careers guidance under a government scheme in England.

^ Click above to read the rest of the article.

I'm not very fond of this scheme. It is better to find out what children are interested in and hopefully encourage them to build on top of those interests. Indirectly this may give the child an idea of what they like to do in the future. The school should offer children with a range of activities to keep options open just in case they might be interested in something else.
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Woodrow
10-26-2009, 01:23 PM
Career advice for kids???????

What ever happened to the concept of letting kids be kids and not needlessly expose them to adult decisions? A child's work is play, let them be concerned with the work of childhood and from there grow into the age of making adult decisions.
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~Raindrop~
10-26-2009, 01:23 PM
Wernt they talking about moving up the school age to six????
and now this. Unbelievable.
One year of school and the ickle kiddies are already choosing their ideal careers.....
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Mysterious Uk
10-27-2009, 02:49 PM
I think it's a good idea, if it is done in the right way.. I wouldn't force the children to pick a job, but rather have fun activities relating to the various fields there are, such as health or education. In uni we did a fun day for primary schools where we took a group of children around university and they did enjoy it. The goal is to show children they are capable of having the future they want no matter where they come from and i promote that. Good old media making it out like it's the worst thing ever.
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Snowflake
10-27-2009, 03:02 PM
:sl: That sounds really silly. How many kids at that age know what they want to do as adults? They change their minds a hundred times about what they want to be. How can you advise a 7 year old about his future? :?

Why don't they start advising kids on manners and respect for others before anything else seeing as parents are failing to do their jobs properly. At least poor kids will have learnt something useful for life.
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Woodrow
10-27-2009, 03:35 PM
Just my opinon this seems to a return to the medieval guilds. By disrupting a small childs normal curiosity through guided imaginary future role, we will be leading them into specific jobs. (Shades of 1984!!)

The end result would result in families being locked into specific fields and this would lessen the actual choices of a career. Return to guild mentality.

Let children have free reign with their imaginations, they will develope their likes and as they age move towards the careers they have genuine natural aptitude for. We live in a time when a single career no longer suffices for a lifetime. Children need to have the freedom to discover their own natural abilities (People will normally love the career they have the most aptitude for)

To begin guiding children into career choices at an early age seems more like we would be setting our selves up to making a government guided society and forgetting self responsibility in life choices.
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Alim Apprentice
10-31-2009, 10:01 PM
Hold your horses, my friends.

The department stresses the scheme is not about helping children decide what job they want to do, but showing them what can be possible so they fulfil their potential.

There will also be more help for disadvantaged and disabled young people in accessing work experience and every young person is to get a careers mentor.
This might be a good thing. Its not necessarily about limiting ones imagination. Showing possibilities will still encourage curiosity, especially for those who do not have access to information. In addition, why are we assuming the way the information to be disserted to children is the same as those to 18 year olds?
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kamran javed
11-20-2009, 05:53 PM
I'm not very fond of this scheme. It is better to find out what children are interested in and hopefully encourage them to build on top of those interests. Indirectly this may give the child an idea of what they like to do in the future. The school should offer children with a range of activities to keep options open just in case they might be interested in something else.
and must b a islamic study
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