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جوري
05-08-2010, 07:31 PM


How much can one person fit in a few hundred square feet? How much does one want to?

Architect Gary Chang calls his 330-square-foot apartment in Hong Kong the "domestic transformer", but we think that moniker is better suited for the architect himself. By designing a system of sliding walls and innovations -- like the guest bed that folds down over the bathtub -- Chang transformed his childhood home into a 24-room apartment. While his renovations are wildly inspired, here at ShelterPop we couldn't shake the feeling that this metamorphosing home was better in concept than in reality.



We checked in with the impeccably organized and notorious neat-freak Robert Verdi to see if he could see himself living here. Well, let's just say his honest and opinionated response doesn't quite align with mine but hey, practicality is in the eye of the beholder, right? So, who's side are you on? Read on then cast your vote below!



Robert Verdi: There's your lifestyle goal and there's your lifestyle reality. My goal is to be a minimalist, but in fact I'm a maximalist. So while this apartment is a little antithetical to my actual life, it does turn me on. First off, you're taking up less space on the planet, which is great. Rich and famous people get these 50,000 square-foot homes, and then a second home on top of that, but when you read a lot of the sociological studies about how much space people actually use, it's 1,500 square feet for two people. That raises your awareness and in turn you keep less stuff. If you watch "The Story of Stuff" (an online film created to expose the "hidden environmental and social consequences of America's love affair with its stuff"), it illustrates why you want to keep less and how we're destroying and corrupting the planet at a rapid rate.

This apartment takes a little more motivation than just walking into the guestroom; you first have to turn the tub off and flip the bed down for your guest. But I don't think it's that stressful to do. It's brilliantly economical in terms of space management and money management. Me, I live in a space that's just over 1,500 square feet after trading down from a bigger place – 2,800 square feet. I didn't need three bathrooms. And I think it's actually easier to have less. It's interesting how your tastes change when you grow up -- my old place was very homey, with big comfy sofas. But it was easier to maintain because it had an easy elegance to it. My new place is like a high class *****'s house. It's very shiny, very polished, very mirrored. A complete nightmare to maintain.

With Chang's apartment, everything is articulate. The complete wall moves to open the kitchen -- it's one move only, like opening a cabinet. And remember, things like sleeper sofas are just product versions of what he did. I have a friend who lives on 5th Avenue in Manhattan and she's looking for new place. I said "Why are you moving? You have a great location!" She said: "I just want to be able to stand up in my bedroom." And you know what? Chang would have made that happen.

Amy Preiser of ShelterPop: This home is a real feat of beauty, ingenuity and eco-consciousness -- virtues I admire and strive towards, but ones that ultimately don't sync up with my lifestyle. This apartment is for someone with a streamlined, effortlessly-organized way of living, not someone who drops their grocery bags on the floor immediately upon entering.

The person who lives here probably always bikes to the store and remembers to bring reusable bags. They make their bed in the morning. They lay out their clothes the night before. Me? I lay out a few outfits the night before, and come morning, toss them on the floor once I've decided on something different. My motto is less "everything in its place", more "there's space for everything!" That's how many a curbside-found chairs made their way into my living room, how all the vases (and vases and vases) crept onto my bookshelves. In terms of square footage per person, my situation is not so different from Chang's. With two people in my 700-square-foot one-bedroom, I occupy all 350 square-feet of my space comfortably. While all his rooms take turns as the main event, mine all live in harmony -- or at least, a sort of jumbled, laundry-on-the-sofa, harmony. My kitchen/living room/office/dining room is all one big space where I can float from activity to activity without officially shutting down the one before. In the middle of cooking, I stop to watch some TV or answer emails. While eating dinner I might get up ,mid-meal, to walk into the bedroom and change into something warmer. There's an uninterrupted flow to my home, a type of sprawl that keeps it comfortable, easy and personal, one that allows for bags on the floor at the entrance and a bathtub that's not always so clean that I'd welcome guests to sleep atop it.

Then again, this version of Chang's apartment is the fourth iteration of the space -- and his book about the processes dips into biographical territory, citing the fact that the apartment's changes are a reflection of the architect's wants and needs. So who knows -- maybe with some time I'll want a dramatic change, a place that's a total Chang-clone. But that's not to say that my current life disagrees with 100% of his masterful ideas. In a word: hammock. Who can argue with that?

http://www.shelterpop.com/2010/05/07/24-rooms-in-330-square-feet-could-you-live-here/?icid=main|htmlws-main-w|dl3|link3|http%3A%2F%2Fwww.shelterpop.com%2F2010 %2F05%2F07%2F24-rooms-in-330-square-feet-could-you-live-here%2F
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جوري
05-08-2010, 08:20 PM
I admire the man but his apt. is positively horrifying and I am not sure his guests would want to sleep on top of the bathtub in fact I hazard question how his bathing habits are like.. maybe like a hospital sponge bath out of a can...

nonetheless I admire his engineering.. I can only imagine what he'd do if he had the space.. although I don't like the look of steel architecture doesn't at all speak to my design aesthetics.. in fact I enjoy the look of stuffy old homes with fire-places and huge library walls, tea pots, biscuits and the works!
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Soulja Girl
05-08-2010, 09:24 PM
:sl:

Woah! Now that's somefin =) Hong Kong's got talent eh?

:wa:
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جوري
05-08-2010, 09:32 PM
I think it is the most expensive city to rent in, even more so than London or NY.. I was really shocked by that when I first read it.. but I don't understand why for such a bustling rich city a family in general would choose to live in a cramped apt. in lieu of a more suburban home and simply commute to work.. (I am an urban girl myself) but if the apt. is this crammed, there is no point to city living at all..

do we have any members from Hong Kong here?

:w:
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shuraimfan4lyf
05-08-2010, 09:32 PM
I heard in Japan people live in similar types of apartments. Where everything is folded etc..
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جوري
05-08-2010, 09:36 PM
Originally Posted by shuraimfan4lyf
I heard in Japan people live in similar types of apartments. Where everything is folded etc..
so true.. but I'd take crammed living in Japan over Hong Kong :lol:

:w:
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aadil77
05-08-2010, 09:53 PM
thats crazy, reminds me of that film tokyo drift where the guy has to sleep in a closet and when he opens his curtains he ends up looking directly into the living room of the house next door
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Ramadhan
05-09-2010, 02:23 AM
Wow. Ths architect is truly innovative and this would solve problems of living in those tiny hong kong apartments.

We often hear how New yorkers (well, manhattanites to be precise) live in such tiny apartments, but one should go to Hongkong to see the true definition of "tiny apartments".
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Dagless
05-09-2010, 02:41 AM
But what happens if his guest is asleep and he wants to use the toilet in the middle of the night? Does he wake him or just go? Its quite the dilemma.
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Ramadhan
05-09-2010, 03:14 AM
Originally Posted by Dagless
But what happens if his guest is asleep and he wants to use the toilet in the middle of the night? Does he wake him or just go? Its quite the dilemma.
That's only a bathtub underneath the guest bed, right?

I'm sure the toilet is in separate room.
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Ramadhan
05-09-2010, 03:35 AM
Originally Posted by τhε ṿαlε'ṡ lïlÿ
I think it is the most expensive city to rent in, even more so than London or NY.. I was really shocked by that when I first read it.. but I don't understand why for such a bustling rich city a family in general would choose to live in a cramped apt. in lieu of a more suburban home and simply commute to work.. (I am an urban girl myself) but if the apt. is this crammed, there is no point to city living at all..

do we have any members from Hong Kong here?

:w:

There is just absolutely no land available in hongkong. Only the richest of the rich live in houses.
I had a classmate from hongkong and he and his family (of 6) lived in an apartment of only around 40 meter square. Space is an absolute luxury in hongkong, thats why you get so many hongkongers move and enjoy living in large countries such as Canada and Australia.
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shuraimfan4lyf
05-09-2010, 04:57 AM
Yeah it reminded me of Tokyo Drift lol..Tokyo is one of most expensive cities in the world.
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Ğħαrєєвαħ
05-09-2010, 11:02 AM
Aslaamu alaaykum
lol SubhaanAllah this quite weird...

I thought everything was kool untill he said hes lazy..What is the world getting to? theyre making life easy for them so that they dont have to walk a metre or 2..These things are making people really lazy and eventually unhealthy...

Next he`ill build a town centre next to his room or something,,,"oh because im lazy, i cant be bothered to walk the mile and get some exercise and buy some foods for me live on"..SubhaanAllaah theyre not good exaamples to follow, so its better to stay away from this garbage...

And Remember Laziness is from the Shaaytaaan....

So yeahh
Wa Alaaykum Salaam
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جوري
05-09-2010, 03:09 PM
Originally Posted by naidamar
There is just absolutely no land available in hongkong. Only the richest of the rich live in houses.
I had a classmate from hongkong and he and his family (of 6) lived in an apartment of only around 40 meter square. Space is an absolute luxury in hongkong, thats why you get so many hongkongers move and enjoy living in large countries such as Canada and Australia.

but it seems like such a rich city.. if they can't go wide can't they go tall? It was horrifying to learn that he and his parents, two sisters and a guest lived in that ridiculous space .. I wonder how their parents managed to have them at all :lol: God forgive me...

:w:
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tango92
05-24-2010, 06:59 PM
^small apartments rule

i used to live in a flat with two sisters and my mum and dad, best times of my life - but then i was only 6 so it would be, regardless
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