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cooterhein
10-17-2016, 10:29 AM
It's now in the very earliest stages of beginning to commence, it will be multi-phased and multi-pronged. The Qayyarah airbase will serve as an important base of operation, 4,000 Kurdish forces are to the east and clearing outlying areas but have been asked to cut off retreat and not enter the city. What we're looking at is the beginning of a slow advance by 30,000 pro-government troops from the south.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-37674693

This could take months, it might go into next year, and the humanitarian crisis that follows will be fairly unmanageable for a very long time. But it has officially begun. Any news and insight, sources and details, things that you feel are valuable and want to pay attention to, let's put that here.
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Born_Believer
10-20-2016, 04:58 PM
The Battle for a separate Kurdish state is almost over.
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anatolian
10-20-2016, 05:59 PM
The battle for Great Middle-east Project had already begun

Attachment 5761
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cooterhein
10-21-2016, 01:48 AM
Originally Posted by Born_Believer
The Battle for a separate Kurdish state is almost over.
That is something I've been following, I've seen things going back quite a few months that quote Kurdish and pro-Kurdish sources who believe a decisive conclusion at Mosul will trigger the next steps in that process. Specific details have been a little hard for me to find though, especially with any kind of certainty. If you have any further details on that I'd be interested in seeing them.
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cooterhein
10-21-2016, 02:15 AM
This is a report from Amnesty International, released a few days ago. There's a PDF to download. It goes through pretty much the whole narrative, I haven't read through all of it word for word but it appears to focus on what Mosul civilians have been going through more than anything else.

https://www.amnesty.org/en/documents.../4962/2016/en/
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anatolian
10-21-2016, 08:32 AM
Originally Posted by cooterhein
That is something I've been following, I've seen things going back quite a few months that quote Kurdish and pro-Kurdish sources who believe a decisive conclusion at Mosul will trigger the next steps in that process...
You Americans care the Kurds so much, don't you? :)
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cooterhein
10-21-2016, 10:58 AM
Originally Posted by anatolian
You Americans care the Kurds so much, don't you? :)
I suppose we do. The battle for Mosul is only partly about Kurdish implications of course, and there are a few other angles to the story that deserve plenty of attention- not least of which is the story of the people who literally live in Mosul (or did until recently), that's got to be the primary story. But the whole thing with the Kurds is a bit tricky, isn't it? There's quite a bit going on there.

Turkey has some significant interest in the Kurds as well, but I think that works a bit differently from the American interest.
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cooterhein
10-28-2016, 10:10 AM
This is a report from BBC on what Daesh is publicly saying claiming and presenting in its own coverage of the battle.
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-37780443

The battle for Raqqa will most likely be more difficult than Mosul, but that is expected to begin before the battle for Mosul is over. There's no definite timetable.
http://www.defense.gov/News/Article/...-to-begin-soon

This one is a Turkish news source, it says the residents of Mosul would like for the coalition forces to move faster.
http://www.yenisafak.com/en/world/mo...i-army-2555105

And finally, this one is an Indian news source that highlights the emerging tensions between Iraq and Turkey. Some of the quotes may be mildly surprising.
http://www.deccanherald.com/content/...aq-turkey.html
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Born_Believer
10-30-2016, 03:59 PM
Originally Posted by cooterhein
That is something I've been following, I've seen things going back quite a few months that quote Kurdish and pro-Kurdish sources who believe a decisive conclusion at Mosul will trigger the next steps in that process. Specific details have been a little hard for me to find though, especially with any kind of certainty. If you have any further details on that I'd be interested in seeing them.
The fact that the media is highlighting Kurdish fighters as great warriors and the increased help provided to them by the US and other so called "allies" should suffice. The process of tearing apart yet another Muslim nation is almost over.
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TheMirza
10-30-2016, 04:11 PM
I am sorry, I dont have any idea about this battle, but is this some way related to the end of times? Just curious.
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anatolian
10-30-2016, 07:04 PM
Originally Posted by cooterhein
I suppose we do. The battle for Mosul is only partly about Kurdish implications of course, and there are a few other angles to the story that deserve plenty of attention- not least of which is the story of the people who literally live in Mosul (or did until recently), that's got to be the primary story. But the whole thing with the Kurds is a bit tricky, isn't it? There's quite a bit going on there.

Turkey has some significant interest in the Kurds as well, but I think that works a bit differently from the American interest.
Originally Posted by Born_Believer
The fact that the media is highlighting Kurdish fighters as great warriors and the increased help provided to them by the US and other so called "allies" should suffice. The process of tearing apart yet another Muslim nation is almost over.
Actually I am not a racist nor a silly nationalist and I have a sympathy for all nations especially the Muslim ones but Kurds must wake up from this hallucination. They are a problem in every country they live in. They are a problem in Turkey, in Iran, in Iraq and finally in Syria. Why? Because their American masters gave them the role of the pupets of the American imperialism in the middle-east. And they enjoy this role for now although they also suffer from it a lot. A separate Kurdish state will be a base for America in the middle of middle-east to control the region easier.

Turkey has a significant interest for Kurds of course because Turkey itself has the largest Kurdish population in the reigion and our interest come from a sincere worry..
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cooterhein
10-30-2016, 07:53 PM
Originally Posted by Born_Believer
The fact that the media is highlighting Kurdish fighters as great warriors and the increased help provided to them by the US and other so called "allies" should suffice. The process of tearing apart yet another Muslim nation is almost over.
If you look at the comparative numbers, the Kurdish Peshmerga have been responsible for killing terrorists at a higher rate than any other regional force fighting Daesh by close to 50%, and they've had less casualties than anyone else too, by a similar sort of margin. There are a number of factors that go into these results- for one, the Peshmerga have been asked, in certain situations, to avoid full engagement of a city center. Leave that for a different fighting force, due to concerns over a superabundance of sectarian hostilities. And to my knowledge, they have been cooperating with these sorts of requests. Additionally, however, this may also be the sort of thing that puts their forces in harm's way to a lesser extent than some others, in relative terms.

And for another thing, the Peshmerga forces, from what I understand, are unique in a couple of other ways. They're willing to have US forces embedded with them, side by side and in the closest possible form of cooperation. Other coalition forces are unwilling to do this sort of thing due to their interpretation of certain religious prohibitions (that religion is Islam of course), and quite frankly, this is comparatively detrimental to their fighting forces and advantageous to the Peshmerga. Ah, yes, one other thing that makes the Peshmerga unique is that they have women fighting on the front lines. Not just support, not just for medical purposes, but actual soldiers doing all the same sort of fighting as anyone else. This is a truly unique thing in the region....it doesn't necessarily make the Kurdish forces better, automatically, but it certainly is unique and in this particular situation, it may also provide a strategic advantage against Daesh. From what I understand of how Daesh interprets their religion (which is a toxic interpretation of Islam), they believe that for any of their fighters who are martyred in the cause of jihad, their sexual rewards in the afterlife will be nullified if they are killed by a woman. So in some particular situations where Daesh knows that they are dealing specifically with Peshmerga forces, that sort of belief would pose a strategic disadvantage for Muslims waging jihad while seeking reward in the afterlife.

Additionally, may I also point out that some forces in the region simply have a lot of fighting experience compared to others. The core of the fighting force for Daesh basically consists of Saddam's guys. Of course they did some terrible things when he was in charge, and I obviously like them even less now that they are Daesh, but they do have military backgrounds and a history of professionalism that is useful in a fight. The Kurdish Peshmerga have a similar sort of history (while being far less evil) and the rest of the coalition forces from Iraq (excluding the forces sent in from Iran) have less of a military history, are less experienced, and have less professionalism in a fight. These are the people who threw down their weapons and ran away from Daesh fighters, surrendering territory and weapons to them in the first place. Compared to just about anything, that's not anyone's idea of professionalism in a fight.

Now, that's my overall assessment of how the Kurdish Peshmerga fit in with the rest of the fighters around them. I don't think I would describe them as "great warriors," I would simply say they have a level of experience and professionalism that is equal to that of some other actors in the conflict and significantly better than that of some others. But I would also suggest that the success they're able to have has as much to do with overwhelming US air support than anything else, and with the degree to which they've been cooperating with US forces. The only people in this fight that truly deserve to be called "great warriors" are the US troops. You can compare them to anyone else you want- this is the greatest fighting force in the world.

I will add one other thing. A friend of mine did three tours in Iraq, and I've asked him about the Kurds on several occasions, in slightly different ways. The one word he always comes back to is "honorable." He keeps saying they're honorable people. Nobody told him to say that, this is just a personal idiosyncracy of his. He values honor in people, he has a particular way of assessing it, and he makes a point of talking about it when he sees it in others. And yes, he has told me that the Kurds (in particular their fighting forces) are the most honorable people that he was able to work with in Iraq.

Now, as to the "tearing apart" of a Muslim nation, it's been the stated position of the US that we want to try and preserve the unity of Iraq while perhaps elevating the degree to which certain regions have autonomy. But from my standpoint, I personally think that the Kurdish people got screwed over more than anyone else during the post-WWII partitioning. I also think that the borders of these countries were determined arbitrarily by external forces, and as nice as it would have been for there to be some large countries that functioned well with religious and ethnic diversity inside their borders, that doesn't look like it's going to work out in the long term. Maybe Iraq and Syria will wind up being failed states, maybe not. I would put most of the blame on the initial partitioning if it comes to that; as of right now though I would expect the US and the rest of NATO to try and preserve the present borders just out of a bias for Westphalian sovereignty. We're probably going to be Westphalian just for the sake of being Westphalian. But if the people who actually live there wind up reaching a peacemaking arrangement where new borders are drawn, I would be happiest for the Kurds if they're able to have a state for themselves. To your point though, I think it would be inaccurate to suggest that outside forces, in this instance, are working on tearing the country apart. Daesh has been responsible for effectively dissolving the border between Iraq and Syria, and these outside forces that you have such a negative bias against are working to keep existing borders in place as much as they possibly can, and if those borders are redrawn it will be the result of negotiations and agreements between the people who actually live there. The US, in its official capacity, has a bias in favor of the present borders. I have a personal bias against the process that put those borders where they are in the first place, and I would personally like for some of them to be determined by people who live there, and that may be what winds up happening in the next few years. But that isn't the stated goal of actual US foreign policy at this time, and I don't believe that's what the US and its allies are actively trying to accomplish.
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Born_Believer
10-30-2016, 10:27 PM
Originally Posted by anatolian
Actually I am not a racist nor a silly nationalist and I have a sympathy for all nations especially the Muslim ones but Kurds must wake up from this hallucination. They are a problem in every country they live in. They are a problem in Turkey, in Iran, in Iraq and finally in Syria. Why? Because their American masters gave them the role of the pupets of the American imperialism in the middle-east. And they enjoy this role for now although they also suffer from it a lot. A separate Kurdish state will be a base for America in the middle of middle-east to control the region easier.

Turkey has a significant interest for Kurds of course because Turkey itself has the largest Kurdish population in the reigion and our interest come from a sincere worry..
Pretty much agreed.

They used the Bengalis in the Asian subcontinent, they've used the shias across Lebanon, Syria and now Yemen and so on. They used various tribal and religious factions in Sudan and Somalia. Kurdish are being used and have been for a long time throughout Turkey and the middle east for decades now.

In fact, I was talking to a Kurdish girl, from Turkey who doesn't like being called Turkish. So I asked her why and she responded by saying because the Turks were oppressing the Kurds. I asked her how and she stuttered, unable to provide any info on it. She isn't the only one. It's the same way many other populations have been brain washed into believing right is wrong and wrong is right and being told they are oppressed, when the real oppressors are the ones telling them that.

Anyway, I guess time will prove us right when a new Kurdish state pops up.
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Mustafa16
10-31-2016, 12:17 AM
Originally Posted by Born_Believer
Pretty much agreed.

They used the Bengalis in the Asian subcontinent, they've used the shias across Lebanon, Syria and now Yemen and so on. They used various tribal and religious factions in Sudan and Somalia. Kurdish are being used and have been for a long time throughout Turkey and the middle east for decades now.

In fact, I was talking to a Kurdish girl, from Turkey who doesn't like being called Turkish. So I asked her why and she responded by saying because the Turks were oppressing the Kurds. I asked her how and she stuttered, unable to provide any info on it. She isn't the only one. It's the same way many other populations have been brain washed into believing right is wrong and wrong is right and being told they are oppressed, when the real oppressors are the ones telling them that.

Anyway, I guess time will prove us right when a new Kurdish state pops up.
while I, as a Turk, hate the PKK and want them to be crushed, the fact of the matter is the Kurds WERE oppressed for a long time.....they were banned from speaking in their language, from acknowledging that they were a separate ethnic group, from practicing their own culture, or even using the word "Kurd", and when the Turkish military fought the PKK they committed numerous war crimes in Southeastern Turkey....thousands of villages were destroyed, many civilians were killed, and many "disappearances" occurred.
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Born_Believer
10-31-2016, 08:16 PM
Originally Posted by Mustafa16
while I, as a Turk, hate the PKK and want them to be crushed, the fact of the matter is the Kurds WERE oppressed for a long time.....they were banned from speaking in their language, from acknowledging that they were a separate ethnic group, from practicing their own culture, or even using the word "Kurd", and when the Turkish military fought the PKK they committed numerous war crimes in Southeastern Turkey....thousands of villages were destroyed, many civilians were killed, and many "disappearances" occurred.
That may have happened, I haven't read up on much of it but how much of it is prevalent in todays Turkey and is a separate Kurdish state beneficial or harmful to Muslims? It is surely the latter as it will be nothing more than a satellite state in the region for the US and Israel, much like Bangladesh is for India and so on.

We've seen this play out time and time again. Sudan is another example.
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cooterhein
11-01-2016, 01:06 AM
Originally Posted by Born_Believer
That may have happened, I haven't read up on much of it but how much of it is prevalent in todays Turkey and is a separate Kurdish state beneficial or harmful to Muslims? It is surely the latter as it will be nothing more than a satellite state in the region for the US and Israel, much like Bangladesh is for India and so on.

We've seen this play out time and time again. Sudan is another example.
Sometimes you're looking at an alternative that involves a fairly credible attempt at genocide. And for what it's worth, when you see a "satellite state" I see a regional partner that deals with the West in a reasonable manner, unlike most of its neighbors. Yes it's different from all those neighbors, but not because it's the only one doing this the wrong way. Quite the opposite.
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cooterhein
11-09-2016, 06:40 AM
Evidence of mass graves written up here, more are expected to be discovered.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/world...351_story.html

Some details of the urban warfare, as it moves into the city proper. Iraqi forces are taking heavier losses, civilian death and displacement is increasing, the exact figures on Iraqi coalition casualties are apparently not available to the public.
http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/isi...combat-n678946
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islamirama
11-11-2016, 03:16 AM
Like i said before, iraqi shia militia and forces one side, kurdish militia another side, and US bombing from top. All to kill all sunnis, end autonomous state and kill all who citizens living under there.

Mosul: Iraqi forces have tortured and killed villagers, say rights groups


http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-37930402
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cooterhein
11-11-2016, 06:49 AM
Originally Posted by islamirama
Like i said before, iraqi shia militia and forces one side, kurdish militia another side, and US bombing from top.
This is somewhat accurate- not completely, since the Iraqi military is primarily involved, which is not the same thing as "Shia militia"- which is an actual thing, it's just a different thing that is quite distinct- but I can't argue with it too much, because Shia militias are also involved albeit in more of a secondary fashion. They do immediately invite concern however, and you are quite right to point out the things that have been reported about them.

It's also worth pointing out that the Kurdish Peshmerga (which is not the same thing as a militia) are staying outside the city proper, and as far as I'm aware, they have complied with requests to stay away from near-exclusively Sunni cities. I have seen some coverage of Kurdish forces liberating Christian towns though. It is worth pointing out that one of the main tasks being undertaken by the Kurds outside the city is to cut off an escape route for Daesh fighters, although assistance for refugees must be part of that as well. The process of deciding who is who must be rather difficult, however I"m not aware of any reports of potential war crimes by the Kurds, and they have definitely been staying out of the city center.

Turkey (in particular Erdogan) has also cause Iraqi leadership at all levels to become quite upset with their military presence in and around the city, for reasons pertaining to their historic sphere of influence or some other euphemism for "this used to be the Ottoman Empire." That is the main thing that triggered the involvement of Shia militia groups (which, again, is distinct from the actual military). It's also worth noting that Saudi Arabia is strategically involved in the key decision making process here, although the Saudi military is not properly engaged in the process.

All to kill all sunnis,
According to who, besides you? Is there some sort of charter or statement of intent, written by any entity remotely involved in the conflict that actually says they want to kill all Sunnis? Is there anything you can cite that lends support to this claim?

end autonomous state
Last I heard, the official US policy and intent is to preserve the Iraqi state while perhaps reworking some of how the autonomy works between states. And we all know what Turkey wants. I do know that the Kurds very much desire an autonomous state, but who besides them has said they definitely intend to try and make that happen for them? Seriously, who besides the actual Kurds officially supports their bid for an independent state, and can you cite this with a source? I would really like to know about this if it exists. I personally would like to see this happen, but random people with opinions on the Internet is not the sort of source or the kind of "official" that I am looking for here.

and kill all who citizens living under there.
According to who, besides you, source please?

Mosul: Iraqi forces have tortured and killed villagers, say rights groups

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-37930402
This is indeed a rather serious problem, and t is rather important to focus in on exactly which part of the Iraqi forces seems to be most at fault. It is a rather fractured group of disparate forces that is just barely cooperating for a relatively short amount of time, we're talking about a group of 50,000 fighting men (and a few women) that are wearing at least a half-dozen different types of uniforms. So who exactly is at fault in this particular report?

To the best of what I can tell, from my reading of your source, it would seem that all of the relevant incidents being referenced have to do with men wearing police uniforms, more specifically the Federal Police Forces of Iraq. Assuming they are indeed police officers who are indeed doing these things, they are employees of the state in a capacity that is supposed to be the exact opposite of sectarian, this is sectarian violence being carried out by exactly the same people that should be standing against it, and the source also indicates that the Command of the Federal Police Forces is reluctant to face up to any type of transparency or accountability at this time, voice concern, or acknowledge the possibility that these things happened and that members of this police force did them. That most certainly is cause for concern, which centers on Iraq's police force and on the future of law enforcement in this country long term.
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islamirama
11-11-2016, 07:43 PM
#Iraq - 13-year-old Sunni in #Mosul brutally tortured by Iraqi army. You won't see this in mainstream media!

Warning: Graphic

https://twitter.com/doamuslims/statu...85223578017793
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Zeal
11-11-2016, 09:02 PM
So sad
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islamirama
11-11-2016, 09:04 PM
ISIS commanders - Speak Hebrew, are IDF ex-generals. Need I say more?


https://www.facebook.com/nidal.sakr/...0393416368374/
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
11-11-2016, 10:01 PM
Originally Posted by islamirama
#Iraq - 13-year-old Sunni in #Mosul brutally tortured by Iraqi army. You won't see this in mainstream media!

Warning: Graphic

https://twitter.com/doamuslims/statu...85223578017793

We make Du`aa that Allaah Ta`aalaa makes it that they get captured by that group they fear and hate so much, and get tied up, and dressed in those orange jumpsuits, and laid on the floor, and get ridden over by tanks. Each and every one of them. Just as they have ridden over this child.

آمين يا رب العالمين

May Allaah Ta`aalaa make their mothers childless, their wives widows, and their children orphans. They, and all those who support them.
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cooterhein
11-12-2016, 07:41 AM
Originally Posted by islamirama
ISIS commanders - Speak Hebrew, are IDF ex-generals. Need I say more?


https://www.facebook.com/nidal.sakr/...0393416368374/
You could say they're Arab Muslims, and they speak Hebrew because they were raised in Israel where everyone learns to speak Hebrew.

Describing the number of people fitting that description as "many" is a good example of a weasel word, and quite frankly it's not really "many" by any reasonable standard. I can believe there's a small number of examples of Sunni Muslims from Israel who belonged to the IDF at one time and then left to join Daesh, but I have a hard time believing any former generals have done this particular thing.

Tell you what, name three. Three IDF generals who left Israel, joined Daesh, and are known to have fought with them at any given time. Remember, the main reason I doubt this is because of the claim that we have former IDF Generals, specifically Generals, that we can point to.

According to this source, 40 Palestinian citizens of Israel have left to join Daesh. This story specifically concerns one man who tried to do this, but was detained and prevented from doing so. http://aa.com.tr/en/middle-east/arab...n-daesh/600089

Out of those 40, I would venture to guess that exactly zero of them were IDF generals, although some small number of them probably volunteered for the IDF, for which Arab Muslims and Bedouins are not conscripted. But hey, if you can name someone who definitely was an IDF general who went on to join Daesh, fire away.
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anatolian
11-12-2016, 04:03 PM
Originally Posted by Mustafa16
while I, as a Turk, hate the PKK and want them to be crushed, the fact of the matter is the Kurds WERE oppressed for a long time.....they were banned from speaking in their language, from acknowledging that they were a separate ethnic group, from practicing their own culture, or even using the word "Kurd", and when the Turkish military fought the PKK they committed numerous war crimes in Southeastern Turkey....thousands of villages were destroyed, many civilians were killed, and many "disappearances" occurred.
Yes, you are right that Kurds were oppressed in Turkey for a while, most especially after the 1980 military coup but considering the fact that 1980 military coup was organized by CIA we musnt be so surprised. Both the oppression and the resistance were part of the same plan of American imperialism in the middle-east. But any consious human being can decide that terrorism is not an opsion againts oppression. PKK raided Kurdish villages and killed Kurds who dont support them as well. They are one of the worst terrorist group in the World, being the only one who specifically target and kill teachers. Also, Kurds are not oppressed in Turkey anymore for a long time and as far as I know Kurds were not oppressed anytime in Iran but we have a PJAK over there. We have evidences for the American militia supporting PKK and PJAK. Kurds must undersatnd that one day their American masters will leave them alone and they will have to face everything alone.

However, I separate my Muslim Kurdish brethren from those terrorists. I have many friends who are Kurd. They are aware of the plan and they support the union. They are the true decendents of Salahaddin..
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Serinity
11-12-2016, 04:24 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
We make Du`aa that Allaah Ta`aalaa makes it that they get captured by that group they fear and hate so much, and get tied up, and dressed in those orange jumpsuits, and laid on the floor, and get ridden over by tanks. Each and every one of them. Just as they have ridden over this child.

آمين يا رب العالمين

May Allaah Ta`aalaa make their mothers childless, their wives widows, and their children orphans. They, and all those who support them.
I hope these low life trash burn in Hell.

One can not even call them human who has the psychopathy to kill a 13-year old like that..

I am very mad, and I can’t believe my eyes how humans can be so low and dark. May Allah destroy them and whosoever supports these trash. Ameen.

I didn’t know people were this cold-hearted. SubhanAllah.
They are low scum who are worse than animals, imo.
Whosoever are with them and call themselves “muslim”, need to die. Cuz it is an insult.
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anatolian
11-12-2016, 04:35 PM
Originally Posted by islamirama
Like i said before, iraqi shia militia and forces one side, kurdish militia another side, and US bombing from top. All to kill all sunnis, end autonomous state and kill all who citizens living under there.

Mosul: Iraqi forces have tortured and killed villagers, say rights groups


http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-37930402
Kurds are an ethnic group. They are mostly Sunni and there are Shi'ites also. But we don't see the bigger map. It is the imperialist plan to divide people over there as Kurds, Sunnis, Shi'ites and make thme fight. It is a divide and control policy. Cant we live together?
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islamirama
11-12-2016, 05:55 PM
Originally Posted by cooterhein
You could say they're Arab Muslims, and they speak Hebrew because they were raised in Israel where everyone learns to speak Hebrew.

Describing the number of people fitting that description as "many" is a good example of a weasel word, and quite frankly it's not really "many" by any reasonable standard. I can believe there's a small number of examples of Sunni Muslims from Israel who belonged to the IDF at one time and then left to join Daesh, but I have a hard time believing any former generals have done this particular thing.

Tell you what, name three. Three IDF generals who left Israel, joined Daesh, and are known to have fought with them at any given time. Remember, the main reason I doubt this is because of the claim that we have former IDF Generals, specifically Generals, that we can point to.

According to this source, 40 Palestinian citizens of Israel have left to join Daesh. This story specifically concerns one man who tried to do this, but was detained and prevented from doing so. http://aa.com.tr/en/middle-east/arab...n-daesh/600089

Out of those 40, I would venture to guess that exactly zero of them were IDF generals, although some small number of them probably volunteered for the IDF, for which Arab Muslims and Bedouins are not conscripted. But hey, if you can name someone who definitely was an IDF general who went on to join Daesh, fire away.
No you could not say that. Arab Muslims speak arabic like natives not an israeli accent and hebrew like non-natives, not like zionist natives. The guy in the video is a isareli himself and the people he confirmed this with were israeli generals also. Why are you trying to deny the obvious ?

You don't know as much as you claim to, nor do I. But I do not deny it when I see something being exposed.
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Muhammad
11-14-2016, 02:09 PM
As far as I understand, this thread was supposed to be for the purpose of sharing news and analysis, to keep people informed about what is happening. It now seems to be turning into a conspiracy theory discussion which is unlikely to get us anywhere. For this reason, it will be closed.
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