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Vikings
05-06-2017, 09:43 PM
i have question

i want know muslim and viking was freinds in history or not
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Silas
05-06-2017, 11:56 PM
There was limited contact between the Norsemen (Viking is actually a verb, not a noun) and Muslim peoples (Turks, Persians, Arabs, etc.) between the 9th and 14th centuries.

There have been some archaeological discoveries made that reveal the Norse had artifacts from the Middle-East (rings, rugs, coins, etc.). Ahmad ibn Fadlan writes of meeting the Norsemen, and describes them as tall, powerful, but barbaric.

Recently, a 9th century ring was found in a Viking burial site with the inscription "For Allah" on it (in Arabic).

This is an interesting area of scholarship. There are even accounts of the Norsemen making it all the way down to Baghdad. The Varangian Guard was a group of elite Norse warriors that protected the Byzantine Emperor, and at times fought against the Turks and Saracens.
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Zafran
05-07-2017, 01:59 AM
salaam

check out the famous Muslim diplomat Ahmed Ibn Fadlan of the abbasid empire. There is also a bad flim called the 13th warrior about the travels starring antonio Bandres.
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Scimitar
05-07-2017, 02:32 AM
first world map was made by Sharif al Adrisi, who was a Muslim befriended by then King of Sicily, A norseman Viking - King Roger. they were close friends.

Scimi
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anatolian
05-07-2017, 08:14 AM
Vikings remained pagan until the 2nd millenia and Muslims themselves wanted to be friend with them against the Christendom. 13th warior tells us a story about it. My bro @Futuwwa may tell us some details I guess.
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Vikings
05-07-2017, 05:33 PM
Originally Posted by Scimitar
first world map was made by Sharif al Adrisi, who was a Muslim befriended by then King of Sicily, A norseman Viking - King Roger. they were close friends.

Scimi
have u other inforomation
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Vikings
05-07-2017, 05:34 PM
Originally Posted by Silas
There was limited contact between the Norsemen (Viking is actually a verb, not a noun) and Muslim peoples (Turks, Persians, Arabs, etc.) between the 9th and 14th centuries.

There have been some archaeological discoveries made that reveal the Norse had artifacts from the Middle-East (rings, rugs, coins, etc.). Ahmad ibn Fadlan writes of meeting the Norsemen, and describes them as tall, powerful, but barbaric.

Recently, a 9th century ring was found in a Viking burial site with the inscription "For Allah" on it (in Arabic).

This is an interesting area of scholarship. There are even accounts of the Norsemen making it all the way down to Baghdad. The Varangian Guard was a group of elite Norse warriors that protected the Byzantine Emperor, and at times fought against the Turks and Saracens.
i think u wrong
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sister herb
05-07-2017, 06:19 PM
Originally Posted by Silas
There was limited contact between the Norsemen (Viking is actually a verb, not a noun) and Muslim peoples (Turks, Persians, Arabs, etc.) between the 9th and 14th centuries.
Where you have got idea that word "viking" is a verb? ^o)

Viking (n.)
Scandinavian pirate, 1801, vikingr, in "The History of the Anglo-Saxons" by English historian Sharon H. Turner (1768-1847); he suggested the second element might be connected to king:

The name by which the pirates were at first distinguished was Vikingr, which perhaps originally meant kings of the bays. It was in bays that they ambushed, to dart upon the passing voyager.

But this later was dismissed as incorrect. The form viking is attested in 1820, in Jamieson's notes to "The Bruce." The word is a historians' revival; it was not used in Middle English, but it was reintroduced from Old Norse vikingr "freebooter, sea-rover, pirate, viking," which usually is explained as meaning properly "one who came from the fjords," from vik "creek, inlet, small bay" (cognate with Old English wic, Middle High German wich "bay," and second element in Reykjavik). But Old English wicing and Old Frisian wizing are almost 300 years older than the earliest attestation of the Old Norse word, and probably derive from wic "village, camp" (large temporary camps were a feature of the Viking raids), related to Latin vicus "village, habitation" (see villa).

The connection between the Norse and Old English words is still much debated. The period of Viking activity was roughly 8c. to 11c. In the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, the raiding armies generally were referred to as þa Deniscan "the Danes," while those who settled in England were identified by their place of settlement. Old Norse viking (n.) meant "freebooting voyage, piracy;" one would "go on a viking" (fara í viking).

Source: http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=viking

Etymology

Borrowing from Old Norse víkingr. Already in Old English as wīcing and Old Frisian witsing, wising, but extinct in Middle English and loaned anew in the 19th century.

Old Norse víking (“marauding, piracy”) itself is from Old Norse vík (“inlet, cove, fjord”) + -ing (“one belonging to”, “one who frequents”) (the -r is the nominative desinence). Thus, “one from or who frequents the sea’s inlets”,

The Old English or Anglo-Frisian form, existing therein since at least the eighth century), could also have been derived from or influenced by Old English wīc (“camp”), on account of the temporary encampments which were often a prominent feature of the Vikings’ raids.

Source: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Viking
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Silas
05-07-2017, 08:44 PM
Technically, Vikingr is the noun form of the verb viking. Some say that viking is actually used as a gerund (infinitive verb form used as a subject)

In English, we use Viking as a noun, but the Scandinavians do not typically refer to themselves as Vikings. Norse is the proper name.
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Silas
05-07-2017, 08:51 PM
Originally Posted by Vikings
i think u wrong
see this article

http://archive.aramcoworld.com/issue...ibn.fadlan.htm
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Zafran
05-08-2017, 12:52 AM
Originally Posted by Vikings
i think u wrong
hes right because the vikings and some Muslim empires traded goods and traveled. Thats why you have viking things in the mid east and Muslim inscriptions with the vikings.
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Scimitar
05-08-2017, 01:13 AM
Originally Posted by Vikings
have u other inforomation
depends on what you mean by "other information"... some things, you may not like!

Scimi
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Vikings
05-08-2017, 10:45 AM
Originally Posted by Scimitar
depends on what you mean by "other information"... some things, you may not like!

Scimi
more thing and any thing
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AbdurRahman.
05-08-2017, 03:17 PM
Originally Posted by Vikings
i have question

i want know muslim and viking was freinds in history or not
the muslims deafeated the Vikings in a major war!:

https://www.islam21c.com/islamic-tho...ms-vs-vikings/
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