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lolwatever
07-21-2006, 01:57 AM
salams guys

does ne1 know where i can find Ibn Battoota's Journal's n diary entries n stuff?

he's a fascinating explorer mashalah... love to read about his adventures

salams
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north_malaysian
07-21-2006, 02:45 AM
Originally Posted by lolwatever
salams guys

does ne1 know where i can find Ibn Battoota's Journal's n diary entries n stuff?

he's a fascinating explorer mashalah... love to read about his adventures

salams
In International Islamic University Malaysia's Library!! I've read it, 2 volumes I think. Good adventures, mashallah!!! Do u know that he was a judge in Maldives for some years. Plus his last travel is to join Muslim soldiers in Andalucia (he's too old but willingly to join a jihad). Of course his comments on Ibnu Taymiyyah also included.
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lolwatever
07-21-2006, 03:38 AM
oh i really love him man.. i watched cartoon when i was little about him its soooo beautiful, i really erally erally love the amount of tiem he put into exploring teh Muslim world and how he felt for everyone ..

lol can someone scan for me the books in the IIUM (int islamic uni of malaysia) lol hehe

btw wat did he say about ibn taymiyah?

salamz
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ABWAN
07-21-2006, 06:20 AM
Assalamu alaykum,
I was trying to find some online resources about Ibn Battuta long back and of all the websites I came across, http://www.sfusd.k12.ca.us/schwww/sc...uta_Rihla.html was perhaps the better one.
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lolwatever
07-21-2006, 06:36 AM
salams oh jazak so much

i lvoe his style of writing, but is there any full version of the 'rihlat ibn battootah' without commentary by ne1 else? the link u gave me only puts clips of what ibn battootah wrote and then they make a boring comment on it.

even in arabic would b cool..

jazak so much
tc salam
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north_malaysian
07-21-2006, 08:04 AM
Originally Posted by lolwatever
salams oh jazak so much

i lvoe his style of writing, but is there any full version of the 'rihlat ibn battootah' without commentary by ne1 else? the link u gave me only puts clips of what ibn battootah wrote and then they make a boring comment on it.

even in arabic would b cool..

jazak so much
tc salam
the ones i've read is English translation of 'Rihlat Ibn Batutta'.

Regarding to ibn taymiyyah - actually Ibn Batutta critized him.
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AHMED_GUREY
07-21-2006, 08:05 AM
i found some of his diaries from africa i would like to read more about his travels around the islamic world and india and china

http://216.239.59.104/search?q=cache...k&ct=clnk&cd=6



img]http://www.swan.ac.uk/cds/rd/images/beachmarket.jpg[/img]

We traveled by sea for fifteen nights and arrived at Mogadishu. It is a town endless in its size. Its people have many camels, of which they slaughter hundreds every day, and they have many sheep. Its people are powerful merchants. In it are manufactured the clothes named after the city which have no rival, and which are transported as far as Egypt and elsewhere

One of the customs of the people of the city is that when a ship arrives at anchorage, the small boats come out to it. In every boat is a group of young people of the town, and each of these brings a covered dish with food in it. He offers it to one of the merchants of the ship and says, "This is my guest." Each one of these people does this similarly.When a merchant debarks from the ship, he goes only to the house of his host - the young person. But a man who has frequented the town a good deal and knows the people can lodge where he wishes. When he lodges with his host, the host buys his goods and sells them for him. They agree on the prices before the sales. This custom is very profitable.When the young people came out to the ship I was on, one of them came to me. My companion told them, "This is not a merchant, but a faqih" (lawyer). So the young man shouted to the others, saying, "This is a guest of the Qadi " (Judge). The Qadi came to the shore with some of his students, and sent one of the students out to get me. I disembarked and came ashore and saluted the Qadi and his company. He said,"In the name of God, let us go and greet the Sultan." I said I would go with them after I had found my lodgings. He replied: "It is the custom that when a faqih or a man of religion comes, he does not lodge until he has met the Sultan." So I went with them as herequested

The Sultan is named Abu Bakr, son of 'Umar. His speech is from the (local) Maqdishi,but he knows the Arabic language. When I arrived with the Qadi (whose name is al-Burhan, an Egyptian, originally), one of the Sultan's young men came out and greeted me. He brought me a dish with some betel leaves and areca nuts on it. He also sprinkled some rose water on me and the Qadi, and said: "My Lord commands that you shall stay at the Scholar's House." (This is the house they have prepared for students of Religious Studies.)

We went to that house, which is very near the Sultan's house, and found it had everything we needed. They brought us food from the Sultan's house, and we ate. Their food is rice cooked with ghee, placed on a large wooden dish. On top they put relishes of chicken,meat, fish, and vegetables. They cook green bananas in fresh milk and serve it separately, and they also cook sour milk with pickled lemons and peppers, with vinegar and salt, green ginger, and mangoes. One of the people of Mogadishu eats as much as a group of us would. Thus they are large of body and fat.On Friday they brought me a suit of their clothing - a silk wrapping instead of my trousers - for they do not wear trousers here. Also, a shirt made of fine linen, a coat ofthe Jerusalem style, and an embroidered turban from Egypt. We went to the Grand Mosque to pray. When the sheikh came out, I greeted him. He said to me, in Arabic "You are most welcome. You have honored our country and given us pleasure.''
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AHMED_GUREY
07-21-2006, 08:05 AM
i found some of his diaries from africa i would like to read more about his travels around the islamic world and india and china

http://216.239.59.104/search?q=cache...k&ct=clnk&cd=6





We traveled by sea for fifteen nights and arrived at Mogadishu. It is a town endless in its size. Its people have many camels, of which they slaughter hundreds every day, and they have many sheep. Its people are powerful merchants. In it are manufactured the clothes named after the city which have no rival, and which are transported as far as Egypt and elsewhere

One of the customs of the people of the city is that when a ship arrives at anchorage, the small boats come out to it. In every boat is a group of young people of the town, and each of these brings a covered dish with food in it. He offers it to one of the merchants of the ship and says, "This is my guest." Each one of these people does this similarly.When a merchant debarks from the ship, he goes only to the house of his host - the young person. But a man who has frequented the town a good deal and knows the people can lodge where he wishes. When he lodges with his host, the host buys his goods and sells them for him. They agree on the prices before the sales. This custom is very profitable.When the young people came out to the ship I was on, one of them came to me. My companion told them, "This is not a merchant, but a faqih" (lawyer). So the young man shouted to the others, saying, "This is a guest of the Qadi " (Judge). The Qadi came to the shore with some of his students, and sent one of the students out to get me. I disembarked and came ashore and saluted the Qadi and his company. He said,"In the name of God, let us go and greet the Sultan." I said I would go with them after I had found my lodgings. He replied: "It is the custom that when a faqih or a man of religion comes, he does not lodge until he has met the Sultan." So I went with them as herequested

The Sultan is named Abu Bakr, son of 'Umar. His speech is from the (local) Maqdishi,but he knows the Arabic language. When I arrived with the Qadi (whose name is al-Burhan, an Egyptian, originally), one of the Sultan's young men came out and greeted me. He brought me a dish with some betel leaves and areca nuts on it. He also sprinkled some rose water on me and the Qadi, and said: "My Lord commands that you shall stay at the Scholar's House." (This is the house they have prepared for students of Religious Studies.)

We went to that house, which is very near the Sultan's house, and found it had everything we needed. They brought us food from the Sultan's house, and we ate. Their food is rice cooked with ghee, placed on a large wooden dish. On top they put relishes of chicken,meat, fish, and vegetables. They cook green bananas in fresh milk and serve it separately, and they also cook sour milk with pickled lemons and peppers, with vinegar and salt, green ginger, and mangoes. One of the people of Mogadishu eats as much as a group of us would. Thus they are large of body and fat.On Friday they brought me a suit of their clothing - a silk wrapping instead of my trousers - for they do not wear trousers here. Also, a shirt made of fine linen, a coat ofthe Jerusalem style, and an embroidered turban from Egypt. We went to the Grand Mosque to pray. When the sheikh came out, I greeted him. He said to me, in Arabic "You are most welcome. You have honored our country and given us pleasure.''
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lolwatever
07-21-2006, 08:08 AM
edit
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lolwatever
07-23-2006, 12:36 AM
salam guys
i found a bigger version of his rihlah online BUT u gotta read this, isn't it amazing:


"The baths at Baghdad are numerous and excellently constructed, most of them being painted with pitch, which has the appearance of black marble. This pitch is brought from a spring between Kufa and Basra, from which it flows continually. It gathers at the sides of the spring like clay and is shovelled up and brought to Baghdad. Each establishment has a large number of private bathrooms, every one of which has also a wash-basin in the corner, with two taps supplying hot and cold water. Every bather is given three towels, one to wear round his waist when he goes in, another to wear round his waist when he comes out, and the third to dry himself with. In no town other than Baghdad have I seen all this elaborate arrangement, though some other towns approach it in this respect. "


lol i watched a documentary where they said that the spanish Muslims had piped water and sewer systems, i never knew baghdad was also that advanced mashalah!!

but there's also this really sad thing... coz of the mongols i guess:

The kindness and ignorance of the inhabitants
The inhabitants of Basra possess many excellent qualities; they are affable to strangers and give them their due, so that no stranger ever feels lonely amongst them. They hold the Friday service in the mosque of 'Ali mentioned above, but for the rest of the week it is closed. I was present once at the Friday service in this mosque and when the preacher rose to deliver his discourse he committed many gross errors of grammar. In astonishment at this I spoke of it to the qadi and this is what he said to me: "In this town there is not a man left who knows anything of the science of grammar." Here is a lesson for those who will reflect on it--Magnified be He who changes all things! This Basra, in whose people the mastery of grammar reached its height, from whose soil sprang its trunk and its branches, amongst whose inhabitants is numbered the leader whose primacy is undisputed--the preacher in this town cannot deliver a discourse without breaking its rules!


http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/sourc...bnbattuta.html
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ABWAN
07-24-2006, 05:36 AM
Originally Posted by lolwatever
salams oh jazak so much

i lvoe his style of writing, but is there any full version of the 'rihlat ibn battootah' without commentary by ne1 else? the link u gave me only puts clips of what ibn battootah wrote and then they make a boring comment on it.

even in arabic would b cool..

jazak so much
tc salam
I haven't come across anything so far. But if you find something, DO let me know.
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lolwatever
07-24-2006, 07:55 AM
will do inshalah :)

btw jazaks bro Ahmad Gurey, i just realised i didnt say thanks now! so sorry hehe

i think the longest unedited excerpt i found so far is the one i posted in the prvious post.. the rest are just fragments..

i think the translation is a bit weird too.. coz its a non Muslim who's translating so he doesn't really understand the Islamic terms in arabic, so he calles jumuah a 'service', a masjid a 'cathedral' and other weird things lol

salamz
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