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ABDULLAH SAOOD
05-31-2005, 04:39 PM
Interesting article I came accross............

Br ABDULLAH


The Prophet, sallallaahu alayhe wasallam said, "Whoever pursues a path to seek knowledge therein, Allah will thereby make easy for him a path to paradise." (Muslim)

The importance of teaching Arabic to our children at an early age cannot be over emphasized. Arabic is the language in which both the Qur'an and Sunnah are conveyed to the believers. In addition, one needs to know Arabic in order to perform salah and make Hajj. Arabic also serves as a medium of communication between Muslims. Allah, subhanahu wa ta'ala, through his infinite wisdom has given children the unique ability to learn second and third languages easier than adults have. Therefore, it is important for parents to take advantage of this "critical period" to teach and speak Arabic within the home to their children.

When referring to native or first language learning, researchers are referring to children who learn language(s) before the age of three. After the age of three, the new language is considered to be a second language. Bilingualism refers to the concept of a child learning two languages through exposure from a primary caregiver from birth. Usually these follow one of two patterns. The first pattern is "one-person, one-language" situation where one of the parents speaks only one language and the other parent another language. The other pattern is when both parents speak both languages to the child simultaneously. This leaves the question - which style is better for the child? Research suggests that the one person-one language style helps the child separate and learn the two languages. This is especially true if Arabic is not the native language of one of the parents. However, consistency is the key. Another situation is when neither of the parents are native Arabic speakers. Can Arabic be used as the primary language in the home and the children speak Arabic as their first language? According to Umm Sulaiman, the answer is "yes." Both Umm Sulaiman and her husband are native English speakers who have never lived outside of The United States. Yet, their seven children speak only Arabic within the home. In order to accomplish this impressive goal, Umm Sulaiman has offered several suggestions for parents.

1. The most important point is to learn Arabic yourself.
For Umm Sulaiman, a commercial course with audio tapes was essential. For others, computer programs that teach Arabic also accomplish the same goal. The main key is to stay one step ahead of your children and use your new knowledge constantly in the home. For example, once Umm Sulaiman knew that one of her children knew a particular term or word in Arabic, she no longer responded to it in English for that child.

2. Another important aspect of Arabic learning is to immerse your family in Arabic
Purchase and use videos, computer programs, and children's books in Arabic. Arrange play dates for your children with other children who speak Arabic. Play the Qur'an constantly in your home. Umm Sulaiman suggests "drown them in the sound." Not only is this a very practical suggestion, but language learning research suggests total immersion as the best method of second language learning.

3. Teach your child Qur'an simultaneously with Arabic.
Children have a unique ability to memorize Surahs. Umm Sulaiman discovered for her children "the sound of tajweed, the ability to know the Makhraj or pronunciation of each sound when learned correctly will also make the sound of Arabic just flow from their mouths." Furthermore, memorizing Surahs with your child reinforces this act of ibadat throughout your child's life. Allah's messenger, sallallaahu alayhe wa sallam, said, "If anyone recites the Qur'an, learns by it, declares what is lawful in it to be lawful and what is unlawful in it to be unlawful. Allah will bring him into paradise and make him the intercessor for ten of his family whom have deserved Hell." (Tirmithi)

4. Lastly, relax and enjoy Arabic learning.

Usually adults have a fear of making mistakes in second language learning. This can limit one's opportunities to practice the language and learn new words and phrases. Furthermore, children may pick up on this fear of making mistakes and they themselves will start using their native language in stressful situations. Adopt the motto: "If you are not making mistakes you are not learning."
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A7med
05-31-2005, 04:54 PM
nice stuff bro
im learning arabic now at school!!!!!
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Arwa
05-31-2005, 11:21 PM
:sl: wa rahmatullahi wa barakatu

Both Umm Sulaiman and her husband are native English speakers who have never lived outside of The United States. Yet, their seven children speak only Arabic within the home.
Subhanallah! :omg:

Alhamdulillah I am learning Arabic too..and I love it! :sister:

Jazakallah khair for the article..sure was interesting. :sister:
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أحمد
06-07-2005, 04:48 PM
:sl:

:D A good step forward indeed . . .

:w:
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Ibn Syed
06-07-2005, 04:50 PM
Inshallah I will try to learn Arabic soon.
:w:
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أحمد
06-07-2005, 04:54 PM
Originally Posted by Ibn Syed
Inshallah I will try to learn Arabic soon.
:w:
:sl:

:D If you're in Birmingham; try QAF on coventry road . . . :p

:w:
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Danish
06-07-2005, 07:17 PM
:sl:
Only way i can speak arabic is if i speak to myself, no one in my house speaks arabic...my grandpa speaks very good arabic coz he was in saudi arabia for 27 years....but in the mean time i cant speak it nor have anyone to speak with
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Arwa
09-25-2005, 11:29 AM
Originally Posted by Danish
:sl:
Only way i can speak arabic is if i speak to myself, no one in my house speaks arabic...my grandpa speaks very good arabic coz he was in saudi arabia for 27 years....but in the mean time i cant speak it nor have anyone to speak with
wa alaikum assalam

lol

Speak it with your family or else you'll forget!!
Doesn't matter if they don't understand.. translate and when you say the same thing next time, they'll know.. plus, then this way, they'll pick up some Arabic :p
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Peace&Justice
09-25-2005, 12:07 PM
“As for becoming accustomed to talking to one another in a language other than Arabic, which is the symbol of Islam and the language of the Qur’aan, so that this becomes a habit in the land, with one’s family and household members, with one’s friends, in the marketplace, when addressing government representatives or authority figures or when speaking to people of knowledge, undoubtedly this is makrooh (disliked), because it involves being like the non-Arabs, which is makrooh, as stated previously.

Hence when the early Muslims went to live in Syria and Egypt, where the people spoke Byzantine Greek, and in Iraq and Khurasaan, where the people spoke Farsi, and the Maghrib (North Africa) where the people spoke Berber, they taught the people of those countries to speak Arabic, so that Arabic became the prevalent language in those lands, and all the people, Muslim and kaafir alike, spoke Arabic. Such was also the case in Khurasaan in the past, then they became lax with regard to the language and got used to speaking Farsi until it became prevalent and Arabic was forgotten by most of them. Undoubtedly this is makrooh.

The best way is to become accustomed to speaking Arabic so that the young people will learn it in their homes and schools, so that the symbol of Islam and its people will prevail. This will make it easier for the people of Islam to understand the Qur’aan and Sunnah, and the words of the Salaf, unlike a person who gets used to speaking one language, then wants to learn another, and finds it difficult.

Know that being used to using a language has a clear and strong effect on one’s thinking, behaviour and religious commitment. It also has an effect on making one resemble the early generations of this Ummah, the Sahaabah and Taabi’een. Being like them improves one’s thinking, religious commitment and behaviour.

Moreover, the Arabic language itself is part of Islam, and knowing Arabic is an obligatory duty. If it is a duty to understand the Qur’aan and Sunnah, and they cannot be understood without knowing Arabic, then the means that is needed to fulfil the duty is also obligatory.

There are things which are obligatory on all individuals (fard ‘ayn), and others which are obligatory on the community or ummah (fard kifaayah, i.e., if some people fulfil them the rest are relieved of the obligation).

This is the meaning of the report narrated by Abu Bakr ibn Abi Shaybah who said: ‘Eesa ibn Yoonus told us from Thawr from ‘Umar ibn Yazeed that ‘Umar wrote to Abu Moosa al-Ash’ari (may Allaah be pleased with him) and said: ‘Learn the Sunnah and learn Arabic; learn the Qur’aan in Arabic for it is Arabic.’

According to another hadeeth narrated from ‘Umar (may Allaah be pleased with him), he said: ‘Learn Arabic for it is part of your religion, and learn how the estate of the deceased should be divided (faraa’id) for these are part of your religion.’

This command of ‘Umar, to learn Arabic and Sharee’ah, combines the things that are needed, for religion involves understanding words and actions. Understanding Arabic is the way to understand the words of Islam, and understanding the Sunnah is the way to understand the actions of Islam…”

(From Iqtidaa’ al-Siraat al-Mustaqeem, 2/207) by Shaykh al-Islam Ibn Taymiyyah (rahimahullaah)
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Zuko
09-25-2005, 01:55 PM
Originally Posted by brown clown
nice stuff bro
im learning arabic now at school!!!!!
Me too, but I've been trying to learn for the past 5 years now... My teachers aren't very good ones, except for this year... It finally feels like I klnow some arabic.... Ok anyone wanna hear me talk arabic? Ok here goes:

Ana bahibul baid...:p
Inti far-kha dakheena (egyptian way to say you're a fat chicken)
Us-kuti ya bint! or ikhlasi! (picked that up from my teacher ;) )
bit busi ala eh?

btw dont mind my weird arabic, I'm still learning and in no way did I mean to offend anyone, I was just messin'
:)
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