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islamicfajr
12-05-2006, 02:25 PM



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How important is it for a new Muslim to change his name?
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Shaykh ‘Abd al-‘Azeez ibn Baaz (may Allaah have mercy on him)
was asked: Does a person who becomes Muslim have to change his name like George or Joseph etc?

He replied:

He does not have to change his name unless it is a name that reflects servitude to someone or something other than Allaah, but it is good to change his name to something better. So if he changes his name from a foreign name to an Islamic name, that is good, but as to whether it is obligatory, no it is not.

But if his name was ‘Abd al-Maseeh [= “slave of the Messiah”, a name common among Arab Christians; a similar name in English cultures would be “Christopher” -- Translator] or something of that nature, then he should change it, but if the name does not imply servitude to anything or anyone other than Allaah, such as George and Paul, etc., then he does not have to change it, because these names are shared by Christians and others. And Allaah is the Source of strength.
Fataawa Islamiyyah, 4/404.



Sheikh Muhammed Salih Al-Munajjid was saied:

For the one whom Allaah has guided to Islam, it is sufficient for him to choose an Islamic first name for himself and to keep his father’s name or surname, because the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) did not command the Sahaabah to change their fathers’ and grandfathers’ names when they embraced Islam. However, he did change the first names of those who had names with forbidden or undesirable meanings. Because your first name has pagan origins, your changing it to another name, such as Bilaal, is proper and correct. But you should keep the rest of your name and surname as it is; this will please your parents.

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The most beloved names to Allaah
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It was narrated by Muslim in his Saheeh (2132) from the hadeeth of Ibn ‘Umar (may Allaah be pleased with him) who said: The Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “The most beloved of your names to Allaah are ‘Abd-Allaah and ‘Abd al-Rahmaan.”

Abu Dawood (4950) narrated that Abu Wahb al-Jushami, who was a companion of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him), said: The Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “Give your children the names of Prophets, and the most beloved of names to Allaah are ‘Abd-Allaah and ‘Abd al-Rahmaan, and the most truthful are Haarith and Hammaam [these names both refer to one who is always doing something, whether good or bad], and the worst are Harb and Murrah [meaning ‘war’ and ‘bitterness’ respectively].” Classed as saheeh by al-Albaani in Saheeh Abi Dawood.

The names which reflect servitude to Allaah (those that start with “ ‘Abd” meaning “slave of”) are more beloved to Allaah than others, because they affirm the attributes that befit Him and do not befit anyone else. No one among mankind has any right to them or any share in them. This has to do with His divine Attributes (sifaat al-uloohiyyah). They also affirm the status that befits the person, which never alters for an instant throughout his lifetime, namely the status of servitude, of being the slave of his Lord. So the name reflects well on the one who carries it; it honours the person who is given this name by describing him as a slave of his Lord. Hence these names carry great virtue.

The connection between the slave and Allaah is one of pure servitude (‘uboodiyyah), and the connection between Allaah and the slave is one of complete mercy. It is by His mercy that he exists in the true sense of the word, and the purpose for which he was created is to worship Allaah alone, with love, fear, hope, worship and veneration, so he is a slave to Allaah.

This is what is meant by the name: that the owner of this name is connected to one of the attributes of Allaah which cannot be attributed to anyone else.

Because His mercy prevails over His wrath, mercy is more beloved to Him than anger, so the name ‘Abd al-Rahmaan (“slave of the Most Merciful”) is dearer to him than the name ‘Abd al-Qaahir (“slave of the Subduer”) and similar names.

So these names refer to these two meanings, that of divinity and that of servitude, and that means that the name is a constant reminder of the slave’s humble position before his Lord, and a constant prayer for the Lord’s mercy towards His poor, humble servant.

Some scholars have stated that these two names have their own special features, which is that in the Qur’aan, Allaah does not mention the word ‘abd (or its plural ‘ibaad) in conjunction with any of the names of Allaah except these two.

Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):
“And when the slave of Allaah [‘abd Allaah] (Muhammad) stood up invoking Him”
[al-Jinn 72:19]

“And the (faithful) slaves of the Most Gracious [‘ibaad al-Rahmaan] (Allaah)”
[al-Furqaan 25:63]

This is supported by the verse in which Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):
Say (O Muhammad): Invoke Allaah or invoke the Most Gracious [al-Rahmaan] (Allaah)”
[al-Isra’ 17:110]

If the first thing of which a child becomes aware and understands and hears is this name, the idea will take root in his heart that he is a slave of Allaah and that Allaah is his Lord, and that his Lord is the Most Gracious, Most Merciful, and it will be easy to raise him accordingly.

For more information please see Tuhfat al-Mawdood bi Ahkaam al-Mawlood, by Ibn al-Qayyim; Fath al-Baari by Ibn Hajar, in his commentary on the chapter Ahabb al-Asma’ ila Allaah (the most beloved names to Allaah); and al-Sindi’s commentary on Ibn Maajah (Haashiyat al-Sindi ‘ala Ibn Maajah).


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Names whose use is forbidden
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Sheikh Muhammed Salih Al-Munajjid saied:

there are names which we are forbidden to use, examples of which are as follows:

It is forbidden to use any name which belongs only to Allaah, such as al-Khaaliq (the Creator) and al-Quddoos (the Most Holy), or names which do not befit any except Allaah, such as Malik al-Mulook (King of Kings). This is the consensus of the fuqaha’.

Ibn al-Qayyim said that names which belong only to Allaah include: al-Ahad (the One), al-Samad (the Eternal), al-Khaaliq (the Creator), al-Razzaaq (the Provider), al-Jabbaar (the Compeller), al-Mutakabbir (the Majestic), al-Awwal (the First), al-Aakhir (the Last), al-Baatin (the Hidden) and ‘Allaam al-Ghuyoob (the Knower of the Unseen).
(Tuhfat al-Mawdood, p. 98).

The evidence that it is forbidden to call anyone by a name which belongs only to Allaah, such as Malik al-Mulook (king of kings), may be seen for example in the hadeeth narrated by al-Bukhaari and Muslim from Abu Hurayrah (may Allaah be pleased with him); in the version narrated by al-Bukhaari, he said: “The Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: ‘The most despised name with Allaah on the Day of Resurrection will be a man called Malik al-Mulook.’” According to Muslim, he said, “The man who will most deserving of Allaah’s anger and most evil on the Day of Resurrection will be a man who was called Malik al-Amlaak. There is no King except Allaah.”

As regards using names that may be used of Allaah or of others, it is permissible to use these names, such as ‘Ali (High), Rasheed (Guide) and Badee’ (Innovator or Originator).

Ibn ‘Aabideen said: “It seems to be the case that they are permitted, even if the definite article ‘al’ is used.” Al-Hasafi said: “What (these names) mean concerning us (human beings) is different from their meanings concerning Allaah, may He be exalted.”

It is forbidden to use names which befit no one except the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him), such as Sayyid Walad Adam (master of the sons of Adam), Sayyid al-Naas (master of mankind), Sayyid al-Kull (master of all), because these names, as the Hanbalis said, befit no one except him, (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him).

It is forbidden to use any name which implies enslavement to anything besides Allaah, may He be glorified and exalted, such as ‘Abd al-‘Uzza (slave of al-‘Uzza – a pagan goddess), ‘Abd al-Ka’bah (slave of the Ka’bah), ‘Abd al-Daar (slave of the House), ‘Abd ‘Ali (slave of ‘Ali), ‘Abd al-Husayn (slave of Husayn), etc.

It was stated in Haashiyat Ibn ‘Aabideen that one should not be called ‘Abd foolaan (slave of so-and-so).

It says in Kashshaaf al-Qinaa’: “They (the scholars) agreed that every name which implies enslavement to anything other than Allaah is forbidden, such as ‘Abd al-‘Uzza, ‘Abd ‘Amr, ‘Abd ‘Ali, ‘Abd al-Ka’bah, and any other similar names, such as ‘Abd al-Nabi (slave of the Prophet), ‘Abd al-Husayn, ‘Abd al-Maseeh (slave of the Messiah).”
(Haashiyat Ibn ‘Aabideen, 5/268;Mughni al-Muhtaaj, 4/295; Tuhfat al-Muhtaaj, 10/373; Kashshaaf al-Qinaa’, 3/27; Tuhfat al-Mawdood, p. 90).

The evidence that it is forbidden to use any name which implies enslavement to anything other than Allaah may be seen in the report of Ibn Abi Shaybah from Yazeed ibn al-Miqdaam ibn Shurayh, from his father, from his grandfather Haani’ ibn Yazeed, may Allaah be pleased with him, who said: “A delegation came to the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him), and he heard them calling someone ‘Abd al-Hajar (slave of the stone). He asked him, ‘What is your name?” and he said, ‘‘Abd al-Hajar.’ He said, ‘No, you are ‘Abd-Allaah (the slave of Allaah).’”
(Al-Mawsoo’ah al-Fiqhiyyah, 11/335).


Using the names of idols that are worshipped instead of Allaah.
Using foreign names, such as Turkish, Persian, Berber, etc. names, that have no origin in the Arabic language.

It is forbidden to use the names of devils (shayaateen), such as Khanzab, al-Walhaan, al-A’war and al-Ajda’. It was reported that the Sunnah is to change names such as these.

Names that are makrooh (disliked) may be categorized as follows:
It is makrooh to use names that have bad or distasteful meanings, or which sound odd, which would cause others to mock a person or would cause him embarrassment, in addition to being contrary to the guidance of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him), who taught us to choose good names.

It is makrooh to use names whose meanings are too soft and provocative or sexy, which is a widespread problem in the naming of girls.

It is makrooh to deliberately name someone after promiscuous actors and singers who star in worthless entertainment shows.

One of the signs of empty-headedness and lack of pride in one's faith is the fact that after a show starring immoral women, people will compete with one another in naming their newborns after these women. Anyone who checks the names registered at the time of one of these shows will see that this is a fact. And our complaining is to Allaah.

It is makrooh to use names that convey any sense of sin and disobedience to Allaah.

It is makrooh to use foreign names that belong only to the kuffaar.
The proud Muslim who is content with his religion will avoid this and not come anywhere near it. The temptation to use these names is very strong in our time, and a Muslim might pick up any name from Europe and America. This is the worst type of sin and a sign of humiliation and defeat. If this imitation of the kuffaar and using their names is merely the matter of whims and stupidity, it is nevertheless a major sin; if it is done because one actually believes these names are better than Muslim names, then this is a devastating blow to the foundation of faith. In either case, the person who has done this must hasten to repent, and changing the name is a condition of repentance.

It is makrooh to use the names of Pharaohs or other tyrants.

It is makrooh to use names that have any undesirable meaning.
It is makrooh to name people after animals that are known for their bad qualities. When the Arabs called their children by such names, it was because of good qualities that they noticed in them, and this was the desired meaning. So when they used the name Kalb (dog), it was because of the dog’s alertness and ability to work hard; when they used the name Himaar (donkey), it was because of the donkey’s patience and forbearance, and so on… This refutes the false arguments of the Shu’oobiyyah against the Arabs, as was explained by Ibn Durayd, Ibn Faaris, and others.

It is makrooh to use any name which is composed of any word added to such words as al-Deen (the Religion) or Islam, such as Noor al-Deen/Nuruddin (Light of the Religion), Diya’ al-Deen/Ziauddin (Brightness of the Religion), Sayf al-Islam (Sword of Islam), Noor al-Islam (Light of Islam), etc. This is because of the great status attached to these words, al-Deen and Islam. Adding words to them to form names is an exaggeration which borders on lying, which is why some scholars said that this is haraam, and the majority say that it is makrooh, because it gives an incorrect impression which should not be given. The way this practice started was that these were titles which were added to people’s names, then people started to use them as names.

Names of this sort may be forbidden for two reasons.
In a name such as Shihaab al-Deen, for example, the word Shihaab means a flame, which comes from fire, then this is added to the word al-Deen (which is inappropriate). This can lead to the use of strange names, as in Indonesia, where people use names such as Dhahab al-Deen (gold of the Religion) and Maas al-Deen (diamond of the Religion)!
Imaam al-Nawawi (may Allaah have mercy on him), use to dislike being called by his nickname Muhiy al-Deen, and Shaykh al-Islam Ibn Taymiyah (may Allaah have mercy on him) used to dislike being called by his nickname Taqiy al-Deen, and he said, “But my family gave me this nickname, so I am known by it.”

It is makrooh to use names that are composed of two parts, and this includes names which include the name of Allaah, with the exception of the name ‘Abd-Allaah (slave of Allaah), which is one of the most beloved names to Allaah. Names which include the word al-Rasool (the Messenger) are also makrooh.

Some of the scholars regarded using the names of angels (peace be upon them) as makrooh. Giving angels’ names to women is clearly haraam, because it implies imitation of the mushrikeen, who thought that the angels were the daughters of Allaah. Exalted be He above what they say!

Some of the scholars thought that it was makrooh to give people the names of Soorahs of the Qur’aan, such as Ta-Ha, Yaa-Seen, Ha-Meem. (The popular notion that Ya-Seen and Ta-Ha are names of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) is not correct).

<wasalam>

islamicfajr
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Aisha20
12-06-2006, 01:03 AM
very interesting... thanxs!! mashaAllah i know many reverts that has changed their name (well... all of them)
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Dhulqarnaeen
12-07-2006, 04:18 AM
:sl:
Nice post...and all the ulama are masha Allah, thiqoh :) Jazakallah khayr akhil karim.
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islamicfajr
12-12-2006, 11:47 PM
Wa Alaykum Assalam

gazakum Allah khyran 4 ur nice passing..

insha` Allah ..i wish this post 'll be useful 4 newly reverted to islam and also 4 newly muslims who's have newly born childs..

<wasalam>
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ilm.seeker
12-19-2006, 05:22 PM
Two more beneficial links

# Tasmiya - Naming the child - Ahya.org - 6p
# The Islamic Naming System - Bilal Philips - 3p

Assalam
http://AbdurRahman.org/
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/salam/
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Erundur
12-21-2006, 08:26 PM
Thank you so much for sharing that article, I plan on sending it to a relative is going to have a child pretty soon :)
Reply

Akil
12-22-2006, 08:35 AM
I have heard that reverts should not change their surname (unless it is very undesirable ) because the ties to family should not be touched. Is this true and what is the Surah or Hadith that supports it ?
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sojourner
01-09-2007, 10:48 PM
If i were to change only my first name, since it was given to me at my christening as an infant...would that be acceptable.
And if so, would i be permitted to keep my last name, which is Daniel, the same as the Old Testament Prophet?
And if so (a lot of if so's), would it be more fitting to use a more Arabic pronounciation?

Thanks.
Reply

islamicfajr
02-17-2007, 02:28 PM
Originally Posted by sojourner
If i were to change only my first name, since it was given to me at my christening as an infant...would that be acceptable.
And if so, would i be permitted to keep my last name, which is Daniel, the same as the Old Testament Prophet?
And if so (a lot of if so's), would it be more fitting to use a more Arabic pronounciation?

Thanks.

Shaykh ‘Abd al-‘Azeez ibn Baaz (may Allaah have mercy on him)
was asked: Does a person who becomes Muslim have to change his name like George or Joseph etc?

He replied:

He does not have to change his name unless it is a name that reflects servitude to someone or something other than Allaah, but it is good to change his name to something better. So if he changes his name from a foreign name to an Islamic name, that is good, but as to whether it is obligatory, no it is not.

But if his name was ‘Abd al-Maseeh [= “slave of the Messiah”, a name common among Arab Christians; a similar name in English cultures would be “Christopher” -- Translator] or something of that nature, then he should change it, but if the name does not imply servitude to anything or anyone other than Allaah, such as George and Paul, etc., then he does not have to change it, because these names are shared by Christians and others. And Allaah is the Source of strength.
Fataawa Islamiyyah, 4/404.
................................................
peace,
islamicfajr
Reply

Yanal
02-26-2007, 01:30 AM
Originally Posted by Aisha20
very interesting... thanxs!! mashaAllah i know many reverts that has changed their name (well... all of them)
NICE THREAD
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Strzelecki
08-07-2007, 10:05 AM
I've chosen not to touch my name at all. :)
My first name is Daniel, which is the name of a prophet anyhow, this simple fact made keeping it that tad more desirable. ^^
I can understand why some people do chose to change their names, though.
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Ebtisweetsam
08-07-2007, 11:01 AM
Originally Posted by buriedaway_4536
I've chosen not to touch my name at all. :)
My first name is Daniel, which is the name of a prophet anyhow, this simple fact made keeping it that tad more desirable. ^^
I can understand why some people do chose to change their names, though.
My sister-law's name is Vanita- she didnt change her name, but her son's name is Corey- and my dad rekons that it means Khoury- Priest. u think so?
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UmmSqueakster
08-07-2007, 01:42 PM
Originally Posted by Ebtisweetsam
My sister-law's name is Vanita- she didnt change her name, but her son's name is Corey- and my dad rekons that it means Khoury- Priest. u think so?
It's fairly simple to find out the meaning of names - google name + meaning

http://www.thinkbabynames.com/meaning/0/Corey

It's Irish/Gaelic for the Hollow.
Reply

believer
08-07-2007, 02:18 PM
Originally Posted by Aisha20
very interesting... thanxs!! mashaAllah i know many reverts that has changed their name (well... all of them)

Salaamu alaikum warahmatullah sister!

I am a revert... and I haven't changed my name... however, I chose some names as pen names... All thanks and Praise is due to Allah! this is indeed an enlightening thread.

Mashallah!
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UmmSqueakster
08-07-2007, 02:33 PM
Originally Posted by believer
Salaamu alaikum warahmatullah sister!

I am a revert... and I haven't changed my name... however, I chose some names as pen names... All thanks and Praise is due to Allah! this is indeed an enlightening thread.

Mashallah!

Ditto - my online handles (rahma and janaaan) are islam influenced, but my name is still the name my parents gave me.

It's funny, I despised my name growing up, as it was very common and I always wanted to be unique. But, when I converted and actually had the option to change it, I decided to stick with it. For me, it's a sign of respect to my parents.
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Woodrow
08-07-2007, 03:27 PM
My poor name hs bounced around like a ping pong ball. The birth name I was supposed to have was changed through a clerical error and my birth certificate came out with a completely different name. I ended up kind of stuck with it. I made an attempt to change it back to what my desired name was supposed to be when I joined the USAF and ended up with an even more complex error.

After many years and many tries I eventually ended up with the same name on all of my private and public records. At least it is small enough to fit on my social security card and State ID cards and all of my bills etc are now in the same name.

When I did revert i did choose the name Abdullah as my Islamic name and the Imam suggested I also add the name Muhammad. So my actual Islamic name is Abdullah Muhammad.

I still use Woodrow as my web ID for many reasons. I feel that it helps remind that I am a revert and Islam is my choice. I also feel there is some logic in the name as to what one of the meanings of the name is:

# WOODROW: English surname transferred to forename use, meaning "lives in a row of houses by the wood."
For those who know me. I am not a city type person, my preference has to always been to live in the forest. Up until recently I lived so deep in the woods I had forgotten what roads look like. Sadly, I no longer have that option.

My original Home that I would love to return to:



My home was just over the top of the hill that is nearly in the center of the picture. As a child sitting on the mossy ground at the top of that hill was my favorite place on Earth.

I know this seems off topic, but it is my round about way of saying that while it is a good thing to change our names to an Islamic name it is not always needed and It is acceptable to keep the old name as long as it is not anti-Islamic.
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UmmSqueakster
08-08-2007, 09:29 PM
Originally Posted by Haidar_Abbas
:sl: well put brother IslamicFajr. besides lolll it sounds proposterous to be amoung believers introducing yourself as "John" or "Mike" or something lolll its better to have an islamic name, it makes us different from non believers, besides who wouldnt want one? :-D :sl:
What was the Prophet's (saws) name before Islam? How about Khadija (ra)?

Do you have any proof that an "islamic" name is better? And just what is an islamic name anyways?

*proud to be a muslim Jennifer*
Reply

Strzelecki
08-09-2007, 12:42 PM
Originally Posted by Haidar_Abbas
:sl: well put brother IslamicFajr. besides lolll it sounds proposterous to be amoung believers introducing yourself as "John" or "Mike" or something lolll its better to have an islamic name, it makes us different from non believers, besides who wouldnt want one? :-D :sl:
There are no prerequisites for becoming a Muslim. Anyone can revert, this includes brother John and brother Mike.
As long as their name has no haram meaning behind it, why shouldn't they hang onto it?
Reply

Asper
08-17-2007, 11:24 PM
i have a question for anyone who can answer it:

From my understanding, the name joshua means "jehovah saves". would this name be considered haram? I know that there is an arabic form of the word (yushua), but still, i'd rather be safe than sorry
Reply

NYCmuslim
08-20-2007, 02:55 PM
How does one change their name? Do they just start calling themselves by their new name and tell other people the name? Or do you go to some sort of gov't agency to get it changed? What if you change your name but your old name is still on school records, bill, social securty, passport etc?
Reply

Kittygyal
08-20-2007, 02:58 PM
:sl:

I changed my name from Jodie to Alisha

rest of my family still calls me Jodie tho (well snowy for nick name)

but i neva chnaged my surname. My surname is Clark and haven't chnaged that

muslim name is ALISHA CLARK naw.
Reply

Kittygyal
08-20-2007, 03:00 PM
Originally Posted by NYCmuslim
How does one change their name? Do they just start calling themselves by their new name and tell other people the name? Or do you go to some sort of gov't agency to get it changed? What if you change your name but your old name is still on school records, bill, social securty, passport etc?
:sl:
To chnage ur name is a big hassle indeed like me i aint a housewife or somethin tooo young for that yet :okay:

but erm i didn't have to chnage bills or anythin.

but on ma passport it's jodie clark coz me bro wudn't let me change it that sux HA!

my step uncle helped me chnaged my with some paper work n a mosque man 2 say i reveterd n sed ma shada
Reply

believer
08-20-2007, 08:48 PM
Salaamualaikum!

Originally Posted by NYCmuslim
How does one change their name? Do they just start calling themselves by their new name and tell other people the name? Or do you go to some sort of gov't agency to get it changed? What if you change your name but your old name is still on school records, bill, social securty, passport etc?
It is best to consult your local Imam if you happen to live nearby one...

In the meantime... you may google for a good Muslim name... however, the best names are starting with Abdul meaning slave of then follow it with any names of Allah... like Adbullah.. Abdul Rahman, Abdul Raheem....

Whe you get a chance to have it official... your Iman can help you with it. But, I didn;t have to go official...

I am called many names here like siddik, Muhammad, Ahmad... I used sometimes Malik and Jibril... but I found out that we should not be using the name of the Angels... so I didn't have to change my name officially since my name isn't anti-islamic.

There is actually no compulsion to change your name officially. I hope this helps.
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believer
08-20-2007, 08:49 PM
Originally Posted by Asper
i have a question for anyone who can answer it:

From my understanding, the name joshua means "jehovah saves". would this name be considered haram? I know that there is an arabic form of the word (yushua), but still, i'd rather be safe than sorry
Salaamualaikum!

Try Google...
Reply

Xena
01-25-2011, 01:28 AM
Well I have a question! My name is Xena. A lot of people have mistaken it for "Zina" Would it be best to change my name? Xena isn't necessarily Christian. It just mean "hospitable" or could be "foreign" in Greek and Russian.
Thanks,
Xena c:
Reply

Nizam1
01-25-2011, 11:44 PM
Originally Posted by islamicfajr
Shaykh ‘Abd al-‘Azeez ibn Baaz (may Allaah have mercy on him)
was asked: Does a person who becomes Muslim have to change his name like George or Joseph etc?

He replied:

He does not have to change his name unless it is a name that reflects servitude to someone or something other than Allaah, but it is good to change his name to something better. So if he changes his name from a foreign name to an Islamic name, that is good, but as to whether it is obligatory, no it is not.

But if his name was ‘Abd al-Maseeh [= “slave of the Messiah”, a name common among Arab Christians; a similar name in English cultures would be “Christopher” -- Translator] or something of that nature, then he should change it, but if the name does not imply servitude to anything or anyone other than Allaah, such as George and Paul, etc., then he does not have to change it, because these names are shared by Christians and others. And Allaah is the Source of strength.
Fataawa Islamiyyah, 4/404.
................................................
peace,
islamicfajr
One of my sons is called "Joseph".

We are revert Muslims and he is just as much a Muslim as any other Muslim boy.
Reply

S.Belle
01-26-2011, 02:53 AM
u dont have to but most reverts do
i legally changed my name after i converted to islam bc i wanted to be called/known by my muslim name and i really hated my birth name so i jumped at the oppurtunity
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Amoeba
01-26-2011, 11:09 AM
Phew. My name is okay then.
Reply

Ramadhan
01-26-2011, 12:28 PM
Originally Posted by Nizam1
One of my sons is called "Joseph".
Joseph or Yusuf (as) is a prophet's name.
Beautiful name based on such a extremely handsome AND pious prophet.
You do not have to change it.
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Nizam1
01-29-2011, 01:30 AM
Originally Posted by naidamar

Joseph or Yusuf (as) is a prophet's name.
Beautiful name based on such a extremely handsome AND pious prophet.
You do not have to change it.
Thanks, I know that.

It's just for some Muslims, they frown upon reverts who haven't changed their names, and I find that upsetting. It just implies somehow that we are second-class Muslims. While we are revert Muslims without Muslim names, I know that were are more practising than some born Muslims with Muslim names. I just think it goes back to the old saying "don't judge a book by it's cover". That's just how I see things.
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shakylla
02-07-2011, 02:12 PM
Very informative thread! A friend of mine asked me this question just a few days ago, so this is quite timely. I was initially under the impression that it's mandatory to change one's name, but now I know.
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Salahudeen
02-07-2011, 06:05 PM
I think english names mixed with muslim names sound very nice lol. Many reverts change their first name and keep their family name.
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shakylla
02-08-2011, 12:49 AM
Originally Posted by Salahudeen
I think english names mixed with muslim names sound very nice lol. Many reverts change their first name and keep their family name.
Lol. You mean like Abu George or Osama Bin Robertson?
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MustafaMc
02-08-2011, 01:20 AM
Originally Posted by MustafaMc
My opinion is that changing one's name is not important unless you feel a conviction to do so. Personally, I changed my first name to Mustafa, but kept my surname. My father's first name was also my first name that I moved down to my middle name. My reason for changing my name was to be known as a Muslim and as a final step in making a full commitment such that "there's no turning back now".
Although I agree that it is not necessary for a revert to legally change his/her name, I am glad that I did. One who does not change his (acceptable) name is no less a Muslim than one who does. BTW my middle name is 'George', the same as my father's first name.
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Salahudeen
02-08-2011, 02:20 PM
^ I meant more like, Yusuf Chambers and Abdur Raheem Green etc
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