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Bittersteel
11-17-2005, 05:41 PM
A court in Saudi Arabia has been criticised for sentencing a teacher to over three years in prison and 750 lashes for mocking Islam.

Human Rights Watch says the Saudi judiciary is imprisoning people who advocate genuine educational reform.

Mohammed al-Harbi was found guilty of promoting "dubious ideologies" and preventing students from going to wash for prayer.

He says he is the victim of a campaign organised by religious conservatives.

Mr Harbi was taken to court by a group of teachers and students at his school in al-Qassim Province, north of Riyadh.

Mr Harbi says they were angered by his criticism of militants who have carried out a series of attacks in the kingdom over the last two and a half years.

'Persecution'

Mr Harbi discussed Christianity, Judaism and the dangers of terrorism with students, and posted signs against terrorism around his school, Human Rights Watch says.

He also reportedly encouraged his students to analyse differences between the Koran and the Sunna, a body of traditional sayings and customs attributed to the prophet Muhammad.


Sentencing Mr Harbi to 750 lashes and 40 months in prison on Saturday, Judge Abdullah Dakhil accused him of "trying to sow doubt in a student's creed".

Human Rights Watch condemned the courts decision for restricting freedom of expression.

"Despite recent education reforms, the Saudi government is imprisoning schoolteachers for having open discussions with their students," said Sarah Leah Whitson, its Middle East director.

"As long as schoolteachers face persecution for doing their job, Saudi children will lose out."

The BBC's Middle East analyst, Roger Hardy, says tensions between liberals and religious conservatives are a constant feature of Saudi life.

But liberals feel that, at a time when the authorities are anxious to show the world they oppose religious extremism and al-Qaeda-style violence, they should be supporting people like Mr Harbi, not sending them to jail, our correspondent says.


http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/4446318.stm



He also reportedly encouraged his students to analyse differences between the Koran and the Sunna, a body of traditional sayings and customs attributed to the prophet Muhammad.
what's wrong with that?what differences are there?

:sl:
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- Qatada -
11-18-2005, 11:19 AM
wa alykum asalam warahmatulahi wabarakatuh.

the guy was tryin to say that the qur'an and the sunnah contradict each other.

they dont contradict each other, he was probably trying to confuse the students to probably give them a distorted image of the sunnah of our beloved Prophet sal Allaahu alayhi wasalam.

if this was the case (the sunnah,quran contradicting each other.)
then why did our beloved Prophet Muhammad sal Allaahu alayhi wasalam's beloved wife hadhrat Aaisha (r.a) say that our beloved Prophet sal Allaahu alayhi wasalam 'was a walking qur'an.'

why in the qur'an does it say:

Ye have indeed in the Messenger of Allah a beautiful pattern (of conduct) for any one whose hope is in Allah and the Final Day, and who engages much in the Praise of Allah. (33:21)


What Allah has bestowed on His Messenger (and taken away) from the people of the townships,- belongs to Allah,- to His Messenger and to kindred and orphans, the needy and the wayfarer; In order that it may not (merely) make a circuit between the wealthy among you. So take what the Messenger assigns to you, and deny yourselves that which he withholds from you. And fear Allah; for Allah is strict in Punishment. (59:07)



Allaah u a'lam.


wasalam o 'alykum warahmatulahi wabarakatuh.
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Genius
11-18-2005, 11:21 AM
The Saudi regime are pretty crazy, i wouldn't be suprised if this guy wasn't saying the stuff he was accused of.
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MetSudaisTwice
11-18-2005, 11:25 AM
salam
if this is true, then he deserves such punishement becasue he is mispresenting islam to other students and he is trying to cast doubts on the students minds
wasalam
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Hajar
11-18-2005, 11:34 AM
:sl:

Its like they can do everything there.. if the Saudi's are so keen on keeping watch what people intheir kingdom say about the islam.. they first have to check with their princes..Especialy i saw a docu about prince Alwaleed bin Talal... whoa he is on the list for 5th richest person in the world and has its own company..Like he want to have woman working for them..and in his building they they do not have to wear the veil..that documentary is outrageous....

:w:
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MetSudaisTwice
11-18-2005, 11:40 AM
salam
sis not everyone is perfect, some are corrupt and some are good
it is the duty of the muslims to guide the one who need to go on the straight path
and may allah protect the kingdom of our two holy cities and may allah guide us all
wasalam
Reply

Hajar
11-18-2005, 11:42 AM
Originally Posted by metsudaistwice
salam
sis not everyone is perfect, some are corrupt and some are good
it is the duty of the muslims to guide the one who need to go on the straight path
and may allah protect the kingdom of our two holy cities and may allah guide us all
wasalam
:sl:
I know not everybody is perfect but for such a country..who has the 2 holy cities..Its a shame that this kinda things happen there...They think nobody know and their big villas protect them, but they forgot Allah (swt) sees them..so they will get punised eventually for their acts.

:w:
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MetSudaisTwice
11-18-2005, 11:49 AM
salam
yes sis i agree, but if someone is misleading the students on islam isn' that wrong? if they say that the Quran and the Hadith contradict each other isn't that wrong?
wasalam
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- Qatada -
11-18-2005, 11:59 AM
yeah it is wrong bro.. both of you (sis hajar and bro mst) are on the same side. they the saudi government need to wake up and take Allaah subhanahu wa ta'aala as their protector.. not the kufar.

Unto Allah belongeth the dominion of the heavens and the earth. He giveth life and He taketh it. Except for Him ye have no protector nor helper.
(9:116)


wasalam o 'alykum warahmatulahi wabarakatuh.
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MetSudaisTwice
11-18-2005, 12:02 PM
salam
jazakallah bro and may allah strnegthen our imaan and protect the two holy cities
and may allah make it possible for there to be a shariah law ruled government in UK inshallah
wasalam
Reply

Hajar
11-18-2005, 12:05 PM
Originally Posted by akhee
yeah it is wrong bro.. both of you (sis hajar and bro mst) are on the same side. they the saudi government need to wake up and take Allaah subhanahu wa ta'aala as their protector.. not the kufar.

Unto Allah belongeth the dominion of the heavens and the earth. He giveth life and He taketh it. Except for Him ye have no protector nor helper.
(9:116)


wasalam o 'alykum warahmatulahi wabarakatuh.
:sl:

Yes bro akhee, I am on the same site as bro mst..and yeah the saudi goverment need to wake up indeed.

:w:
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MetSudaisTwice
11-18-2005, 12:07 PM
salam
yes i understand that the government needs to wake up but what if they left it as it is? the teacher would have totally convinced the students of his views and would have misguided them
wasalam
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- Qatada -
11-18-2005, 12:08 PM
thas exactly wa we tryna say :p lol.

he deserved it.

wasalam o 'alykum warahmatulahi wabarakatuh.
Reply

MetSudaisTwice
11-18-2005, 12:09 PM
salam
ok lol, sorry for the misunderstanding
wasalam
Reply

Hajar
11-18-2005, 12:12 PM
:sl:

yes bro..he deserved it...

:w:
Reply

Shana524
11-18-2005, 02:58 PM
:sl:
You guys are right, if he did advocate such blasphemy then he deserved it. It’s funny how the human right groups are outraged because of the court’s decision to restrict freedom of expression. They completely ignored the fact that the teacher didn’t allow the students to wash for prayer (I’m assuming they couldn’t pray or they prayed late).
These groups view everything from the western perspective. They never consider issues we, as Muslims find insulting. Their evaluations are always according to their un-Islamic standards. And I’m glad I don’t measure up to their standards.
:w:
Reply

~Raindrop~
11-18-2005, 03:03 PM
Originally Posted by Shana524
:sl:
You guys are right, if he did advocate such blasphemy then he deserved it. It’s funny how the human right groups are outraged because of the court’s decision to restrict freedom of expression. They completely ignored the fact that the teacher didn’t allow the students to wash for prayer (I’m assuming they couldn’t pray or they prayed late).
These groups view everything from the western perspective. They never consider issues we, as Muslims find insulting. Their evaluations are always according to their un-Islamic standards. And I’m glad I don’t measure up to their standards.
:w:
couldnt have put it better sis.
Reply

MetSudaisTwice
11-18-2005, 03:25 PM
salam
mashallah very true and well said sis
wasalam
Reply

Bittersteel
11-18-2005, 04:23 PM
The BBC's Middle East analyst, Roger Hardy, says tensions between liberals and religious conservatives are a constant feature of Saudi life.

But liberals feel that, at a time when the authorities are anxious to show the world they oppose religious extremism and al-Qaeda-style violence, they should be supporting people like Mr Harbi, not sending them to jail, our correspondent says.
the last thing I want is secularism taking over Saudi Arabia,or any other man made laws.
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mahdisoldier19
11-22-2005, 08:18 PM
salam

Well if the saudis provide evidence of 4 witnesses , then yes he deserves what he got
Reply

Muezzin
11-22-2005, 08:20 PM
Originally Posted by Shana524
:sl:
You guys are right, if he did advocate such blasphemy then he deserved it. It’s funny how the human right groups are outraged because of the court’s decision to restrict freedom of expression. They completely ignored the fact that the teacher didn’t allow the students to wash for prayer (I’m assuming they couldn’t pray or they prayed late).
Yup. In not letting them perform wudhu, he was restricting their freedom of religion.
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