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Halloween in Islam: Trick or treat?

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    Halloween in Islam: Trick or treat?

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    halloween 1 - Halloween in Islam: Trick or treat?

    Every year, on the evening of October 31st, millions of children across North America paint their faces, dress up in costumes and go from door to door in order to collect treats. The adults often decorate their houses with ghostly figures, carve scary faces on pumpkins, and put candles in them to create Jack-O-Lanterns. Unfortunately, among the millions of North Americans partaking in this custom, many are Muslims.


    Origins of the Halloween Festival

    The ancient Celtic (Irish/Scottish/Welsh) festival called Samhain is considered by most historians and scholars to be the predecessor of what is now Halloween. Samhain was the New Year’s Day of the pagan Celts. It was also their Day of the Dead, a time when it was believed that the souls of those who had died during the year were allowed access into the ‘Land of the Dead’. Many traditional beliefs and customs associated with Samhain continue to be practiced today on the 31st of October. Most notable of these customs are the practices of leaving offerings of food and drink (now candy) to masked and costumed revelers, and the lighting of bonfires. Elements of this festival were incorporated into the Christian festival of All Hallows Eve, or Hallow-Even, the night preceding All Saint’s (Hallows’) Day. It is the glossing of the name Hallow-Even that has given us the name of Halloween. Until recent times in some parts of Europe, it was believed that on this night the dead walked amongst them, and that witches and warlocks flew in their midst. In preparation for this, bonfires were built to ward off these malevolent spirits.

    By the 19th century, witches’ pranks were replaced by children’s tricks. The spirits of Samhain, once believed to be wild and powerful, were now recognized as being evil. Devout Christians began rejecting this festival. They had discovered that the so-called gods, goddesses, and other spiritual beings of the pagan religions, were in fact, diabolical deceptions. The spiritual forces that people experienced during this festival were indeed real, but they were manifestations of the devil that misled people toward the worship of false idols. Thus, they rejected the customs associated with Halloween, including all representations of ghosts, vampires, and human skeletons – symbols of the dead – and of the devil and other wicked and evil creatures. It must also be noted that, to this day, many Satan-worshippers consider the evening of October 31st to be their most sacred. And many devout Christians today continue to distance themselves from this pagan festival.

    Many traditional beliefs and customs associated with Samhain continue to be practiced today on the 31st of October. Most notable of these customs are the practices of leaving offerings of food and drink (now candy) to masked and costumed revellers, and the lighting of bonfires. Elements of this festival were incorporated into the Christian festival of All Hallow's Eve, or Hallow-Even, the night preceding All Saint's (Hallows') Day. It is the glossing of the name Hallow-Even that has given us the name of Halloween. Until recent times in some parts of Europe, it was believed that on this night the dead walked amongst them, and that witches and warlocks flew in their midst. In preparation for this, bonfires were built to ward off these malevolent spirits. By the 19th century, witches' pranks were replaced by children's tricks. The spirits of Samhain, once believed to be wild and powerful, were now recognised as being evil. Devout Christians began rejecting this festival. They had discovered that the so-called gods, goddesses, and other spiritual beings of the pagan religions, were in fact diabolical deceptions. The spiritual forces that people experienced during this festival were indeed real, but they were manifestations of the devil who misled people toward the worship of false idols. Thus, they rejected the customs associated with Halloween, including all representations of ghosts, vampires, and human skeletons - symbols of the dead - and of the devil and other wicked and evil creatures. It must also be noted that, to this day, many Satan-worshippers consider the evening of October 31st to be their most sacred.

    The ancient Celtic (Irish/Scottish/Welsh) festival called Samhain is considered by most historians and scholars to be the predecessor of what is now Halloween. Samhain was the New Year's Day of the pagan Celts. It was also their Day of the Dead, a time when it was believed that the souls of those who had died during the year were allowed access into the 'Land of the Dead.'

    timeline 100 1 - Halloween in Islam: Trick or treat?


    Islamic standpoint

    Our beloved Prophet Muhammad sallallaahu 'alayhi wa sallam issued a stern warning in this regard by stating:"Whoever imitates a people is one of them." [Abu Daawood]. Muslims should heed this warning and refrain from copying or imitating the Kuffaar (disbelievers) in their celebrations. Islam has strongly forbidden Muslims from following the religious or social customs of the non-Muslims, especially those of the idol-worshippers or those who worship the devil.

    The Prophet sallallaahu 'alayhi wa sallam said: "I swear by Him in Whose hands is my life! You are ordered to enjoin good and forbid evil, or else Allaah will certainly afflict you with torments. Thereafter, even your Du'aa' (supplications) will not be accepted." [At-Tirmithi]

    From an Islamic standpoint, Halloween is one of the worst celebrations due to its origins and history. It is Haraam (forbidden) to partake in such a practice, even if there may be some seemingly good or harmless elements in it, as evidenced by a statement from the Prophet sallallaahu alayhi wa sallam: "Every innovation (in our religion) is misguidance, even if the people regard it as something good." [Ad-Daarimi]

    Sources: islamweb.net, aburuqya.com
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    Re: Halloween in Islam: Trick or treat?

    aren't you meant to blow up the houses of parliament in westminster as an annual ritual?
    you know, like remembering guy fawkes or something.
    Halloween in Islam: Trick or treat?




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    strivingobserver98's Avatar Jewel of IB
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    Re: Halloween in Islam: Trick or treat?

    Look what a Muslim family put on their door, Masha Allah .

    Trick and Treat Dawah.

    12065607 169477116731996 2613933215364377248 n?oh74ebbb67ca5451e138bbbae3abc99991&ampoe56C052BA - Halloween in Islam: Trick or treat?
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    Re: Halloween in Islam: Trick or treat?

    It's a pagan celebration during the time of the Romans to hide from the wrath of the Gods...
    It's interesting to learn about it, but it's haram to to do it
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    Re: Halloween in Islam: Trick or treat?

    It is quite unbelievable as to how much of old European traditions have kept up into the modern world. I mean people still follow pagan rites and still knowingly have pagan festivals. As in modern folk festivals.

    Next thing you know, we'll have vikings dressing up for war again, oh wait, that already happens.
    Halloween in Islam: Trick or treat?

    It has been narrated on the authority of 'Arfaja who said:

    I have heard the Messenger of Allah (ﷺ) say: Different evils will make their appearance in the near future. Anyone who tries to disrupt the affairs of this Umma while they are united you should strike him with the sword whoever he be.
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    Re: Halloween in Islam: Trick or treat?

    format_quote Originally Posted by فرحان View Post
    Look what a Muslim family put on their door, Masha Allah .

    Trick and Treat Dawah.

    wwwislamicboardcom - Halloween in Islam: Trick or treat?
    Ask this family if other families may follow suit next year.
    I know they won't deny anyone the opportunity to such a brilliant idea masha'Allah, I'd still ask as a formality though.
    Halloween in Islam: Trick or treat?


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    Re: Halloween in Islam: Trick or treat?

    format_quote Originally Posted by BlueOwl358 View Post
    It is quite unbelievable as to how much of old European traditions have kept up into the modern world.
    They change their meaning though. Trick or treating in Ontario, where I live, has nothing to do with demon spirits or anything of the sort. Its more about children eating too much candy and people dressing up and playing make believe. Likewise Easter is about hunts for hidden chocolate eggs and Christmas is about a fat man who goes down chimneys and tells people to share. I take part in all of these events to one extent or another, and I believe in nothing supernatural.
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    Re: Halloween in Islam: Trick or treat?

    format_quote Originally Posted by Pygoscelis View Post
    They change their meaning though. Trick or treating in Ontario, where I live, has nothing to do with demon spirits or anything of the sort. Its more about children eating too much candy and people dressing up and playing make believe. Likewise Easter is about hunts for hidden chocolate eggs and Christmas is about a fat man who goes down chimneys and tells people to share. I take part in all of these events to one extent or another, and I believe in nothing supernatural.
    I didn't say that people who celebrated Easter and Christmas believed in anything supernatural, I said that these acts are still done, which is a thing that stands separate from intent, as I was referring to the action. This in itself is something. Also, I was partly referring to events which do have people celebrating them for the original reasons, which include, as I said, festivals of neo-paganism or modern folk religion.
    Halloween in Islam: Trick or treat?

    It has been narrated on the authority of 'Arfaja who said:

    I have heard the Messenger of Allah (ﷺ) say: Different evils will make their appearance in the near future. Anyone who tries to disrupt the affairs of this Umma while they are united you should strike him with the sword whoever he be.
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