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'150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

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    '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan (OP)


    Salaam

    Another update on the situation in Afghanistan

    Rare interviews with militants shine light on resilient movement that resisted both Obama’s surge and now Trump’s ‘killing terrorists’ strategy

    Squatting on the floor, a brown shawl draped over his shoulders, the Taliban commander and his bodyguard swiped on their phones through attack footage edited to look like video games, with computerised crosshairs hovering over targets. “Allahu Akbar,” they said every time a government Humvee hit a landmine.

    Mullah Abdul Saeed, who met the Guardian in the barren backcountry of Logar province where he leads 150 Taliban militants, has fought foreign soldiers and their Afghan allies since the US-led coalition invaded Afghanistan when he was 14. The Taliban now controls its largest territory since being forced from power, and seems to have no shortage of recruits.

    By prolonging and expanding its military presence in Afghanistan, the US aims to coerce the Taliban to lay down arms, but risks hardening insurgents who have always demanded withdrawal of foreign troops before peace talks.

    In interviews with rank-and-file Taliban fighters in Logar and another of Afghanistan’s embattled provinces, Wardak, the Guardian found a fragmented but resilient movement, united in resistance against foreign intervention.

    Referring to Barack Obama’s surge, Saeed said: “150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us.” And an extra 4,000 US soldiers, as Donald Trump will deploy, “will not change the morale of our mujahideen,” he said. “The Americans were walking in our villages, and we pushed them out.” For the Taliban to consider peace, he said, “foreigners must leave, and the constitution must be changed to sharia.”

    Active Taliban footsoldiers rarely agree to meet western reporters. Men such as Saeed, who spoke without leadership permission, provide valuable insight into a movement that after 16 years in armed opposition remains largely an enigma.

    Arriving on a motorbike kicking up dust, Saeed and his Kalashnikov-carrying bodyguard, Yamin, were aloof at first but warmed as the conversation evolved. Saeed said that as the war has changed, the Taliban have adjusted, too. US soldiers now predominantly train Afghans, and have ramped up airstrikes.

    “It’s true, it has become harder to fight the Americans. But we use suicide bombers, and we will use more of them,” Saeed said. “If the US changes its tactics of fighting, so do we.” That change has meant ever-fiercer attacks, with large truck bombs in populated areas and audacious assaults on military bases.

    In April, Taliban fighters in army uniforms stormed a northern army academy and killed at least 150 soldiers in the biggest assault on the army of the entire war. This month, suicide bombers wiped out a whole army unit, ramming two Humvees packed with explosives into a base in Kandahar.

    As Saeed spoke, three young boys from the civilian family at the house where the interview took place brought tea. They giggled as they listened in on the fighters’ radio. Saeed spoke with a calm, professorial demeanour but his words brimmed with the anger of a man who has spent his adult life fighting a generation-long war, and lost 12 family members doing it.

    Pressed on the record-high number of civilian deaths in the war, he said the Taliban “make mistakes” and try to avoid harming civilians, but added: “If there is an infidel in a flock of sheep, you are permitted to attack that flock of sheep.”

    The Taliban was always outnumbered and technologically outmatched by its foreign adversaries, but is arguably at its strongest since 2001, threatening several provincial capitals. The movement, though, is divided, with some lower-ranking commanders backing rivals of the current chief, Mawlawi Haibatullah, or more radical outfits such as Islamic State. But rifts have not stopped the group from advancing.

    Saeed claimed: “10-15 people join the mujahideen [in Logar] every day, sometimes also policemen,” adding that mistreatment by government and foreign forces helps recruitment.

    “Many Taliban become suicide bombers after prison. Why?” he asked, describing how prison guards torture detainees by applying air pressure, beatings or electric shock to their genitals. After a detainee is released, he said, the shame is too much to bear. Such claims of government torture have been documented by the UN.

    While few in the international community think the war can be won militarily, the US shows little intention of reviving the dormant peace process. “We are not nation-building again. We are killing terrorists,” Trump said when announcing his south Asia strategy. “In the end we will win.” Crucially, Trump has not established criteria for when US troops will be pulled home.

    In a separate interview in the beleaguered Wardak province, Omari, 23, who has six years’ frontline experience, told the Guardian he had considered leaving the insurgency and taking his family to Kabul. “But if the Americans come back to Wardak, I will fight them,” he said. Omari was less cavalier than Saeed about civilian casualties, which he said damaged the Taliban’s standing with ordinary Afghans, who have become more reluctant to shelter them.

    Yet, the two militants did agree on one thing: American soft power is as dangerous as uniformed soldiers, especially as US troops have dwindled in numbers. That belief materialised last year when militants, in a stunningly grisly attack, stormed the American University in Kabul, killing 16 students and staff members. In the capital, many regard the university as one of the pinnacles of post-Taliban Afghanistan.

    Though no group claimed responsibility for the attack, Saeed and Omari agreed the university posed a threat. “We should kill those teachers who change the minds of society,” Saeed said.

    Currently, the Taliban seem capable of upholding a slow-burning war, with the help of outside benefactors. After recent US pressure on Pakistan to crack down on militant sanctuaries, some Taliban fighters consider opting for another regional neighbour, Omari said: “Many Taliban want to leave Pakistan for Iran. They don’t trust Pakistan anymore.”

    Pakistan denies harbouring militants, but Saeed admitted receiving assistance from Pakistan, though he denied being under anyone’s thumb. “Having relations is one thing, taking orders is something else,” he said. “Every party, if they want to be stronger, need to talk to other countries. We should talk to Iran, and we should talk to Pakistan. Just like the Afghan government goes to India and China.”

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/oct/31/150000-americans-couldnt-beat-us-taliban-fighters-defiant-in-afghanistan

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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

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    Salaam

    Another update.



    More interviews.





    Another interview.







    And another.





    Visiting outside Kabul.





    More generally





    Good summary of the situation.

    5Pillars editor Roshan Muhammed Salih reflects on what he's learned about Afghanistan over the past two weeks.

    Last edited by سيف الله; 11-21-2021 at 08:06 PM.
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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    Salaam

    Much requested, Roshan managed to interview Afghan sisters.

    Roshan Muhammed Salih went to Kabul Education University to talk to women who support the new Islamic Emirate.




    Comment.



    Responses.



    Firstly, one of the sisters was nervous for sure but not bc she was scared of the Taliban, but bc this was her first i/v and a foreign journalist had just stuck a camera in her face. This can be intimidating. I spoke to her off camera too & am satisfied she is a true believer

    A lot of ppl are saying I should subtitle my interviews instead of doing voice overs. I agree this would be more authentic but pls understand that it would also take a lot of time and I am working alone here without the back up of a big company. This is why I do voice overs.

    Pro-West & anti-Taliban Afghans (most living abroad & doubtless many collaborators among them) have said the i/v was fake. I'll let viewers decide who has more integrity - a journalist who has worked transparently for 23 yrs or traitors who sold their nation to foreigners. A better question would be were the views of the Afghan women representative of Afghan women? I have no idea. My best guess is that

    Afghan women are v divided. But given that MSM always i/vs liberal Afghan women I thought it was important to interview pro Taliban Muslim women



    Freedom of speech and all that.



    Given who owns facebook we shouldnt be too surprised.
    Last edited by سيف الله; 11-26-2021 at 01:19 PM.
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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    Salaam

    More comment.





    Kabul’s dirty little secret – the hordes of Afghan collaborators

    Roshan Muhammed Salih reporting from Kabul, says that Muslims need to have a less generous view of collaborators otherwise we will be giving the West a green light to invade, occupy and subjugate.

    During nearly three weeks in Afghanistan, I have been dismayed to encounter a huge number of people who collaborated with the U.S.-led NATO occupation forces.

    These people have been remarkably candid with me when the camera was not rolling and the tape wasn’t recording. And they offered a variety of excuses and justifications for their treason.

    We all know that over one hundred thousand Afghans who worked for the Americans, the British and others were evacuated from the country in August as the occupation authorities fled or surrendered to the Taliban.

    But many more remained behind and I have met dozens of them. They are ordinary people who work in ordinary jobs or who are now unemployed. They may have served the occupation forces in hotels or worked for them in administrative roles. Or they may have accepted contracts from them to build infrastructure and implement projects.

    Talking to these people, most justified their collaboration by saying they did it because they were dirt poor and needed to put food on the table for their families. Others offered no excuses to me and said they saw nothing wrong with working with the Americans because they were far better than the Taliban. While others seemed genuinely troubled and remorseful because of their actions.

    I guess a generous interpretation of this collaboration is that most Afghans did it out of pure desperation in low-level jobs and have no blood on their hands. And who am I – someone who lives a comfortable life in the West – to judge them? Perhaps I would have done the same thing if I were in their position (I hope not).

    A less charitable view – and one which I share – is that the occupation simply could not have worked for so long without the sheer legions of Afghans willing to work with foreign invaders and occupiers. Ultimately all these people committed treachery to one degree or another and sold their nation down the river to foreigners.

    Also, we must remember that huge numbers of Afghans refused to collaborate with the foreigners and sacrificed everything to liberate their country from invaders.

    As for the Taliban, they have declared a general amnesty against collaborators and there is definitely no systemic policy of reprisals against them. In fact, I have met collaborators in ministries who have kept their jobs and have been assured forgiveness by the Taliban.

    On the other hand, I have also heard anecdotal evidence of cases of reprisals being carried out at a local level, often against people who have been denounced by their own neighbours.

    Moreover, these stories of collaboration in Kabul have got me thinking of collaboration that has taken place in other Muslim countries I have reported on. In Iraq, the Americans and the British could not have operated without legions of domestic collaborators. Neither could the Israelis control Palestine without Palestinian collaborators.

    In my view our attitude to these collaborators is far too forgiving. You don’t even have to be Muslim to realise that one of the most serious crimes you can commit in any country is to help a foreign power establish their authority over your nation. It’s called treason and the usual punishment for it is extremely harsh.

    That said, it’s true that if the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan pursued a no-tolerance policy against collaborators they would be jailing hundreds of thousands of people, which is unrealistic for a movement that is trying to win hearts and minds and rebuild a nation.

    But at the same time if our general attitude is one of forgiveness to traitors who are willing to betray their own nation, then this is a recipe for eternal Western invasion, occupation and subjugation.

    https://5pillarsuk.com/2021/11/25/ka...collaborators/
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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    format_quote Originally Posted by سيف الله View Post
    Salaam

    More comment.





    Kabul’s dirty little secret – the hordes of Afghan collaborators

    Roshan Muhammed Salih reporting from Kabul, says that Muslims need to have a less generous view of collaborators otherwise we will be giving the West a green light to invade, occupy and subjugate.

    During nearly three weeks in Afghanistan, I have been dismayed to encounter a huge number of people who collaborated with the U.S.-led NATO occupation forces.

    These people have been remarkably candid with me when the camera was not rolling and the tape wasn’t recording. And they offered a variety of excuses and justifications for their treason.

    We all know that over one hundred thousand Afghans who worked for the Americans, the British and others were evacuated from the country in August as the occupation authorities fled or surrendered to the Taliban.

    But many more remained behind and I have met dozens of them. They are ordinary people who work in ordinary jobs or who are now unemployed. They may have served the occupation forces in hotels or worked for them in administrative roles. Or they may have accepted contracts from them to build infrastructure and implement projects.

    Talking to these people, most justified their collaboration by saying they did it because they were dirt poor and needed to put food on the table for their families. Others offered no excuses to me and said they saw nothing wrong with working with the Americans because they were far better than the Taliban. While others seemed genuinely troubled and remorseful because of their actions.

    I guess a generous interpretation of this collaboration is that most Afghans did it out of pure desperation in low-level jobs and have no blood on their hands. And who am I – someone who lives a comfortable life in the West – to judge them? Perhaps I would have done the same thing if I were in their position (I hope not).

    A less charitable view – and one which I share – is that the occupation simply could not have worked for so long without the sheer legions of Afghans willing to work with foreign invaders and occupiers. Ultimately all these people committed treachery to one degree or another and sold their nation down the river to foreigners.

    Also, we must remember that huge numbers of Afghans refused to collaborate with the foreigners and sacrificed everything to liberate their country from invaders.

    As for the Taliban, they have declared a general amnesty against collaborators and there is definitely no systemic policy of reprisals against them. In fact, I have met collaborators in ministries who have kept their jobs and have been assured forgiveness by the Taliban.

    On the other hand, I have also heard anecdotal evidence of cases of reprisals being carried out at a local level, often against people who have been denounced by their own neighbours.

    Moreover, these stories of collaboration in Kabul have got me thinking of collaboration that has taken place in other Muslim countries I have reported on. In Iraq, the Americans and the British could not have operated without legions of domestic collaborators. Neither could the Israelis control Palestine without Palestinian collaborators.

    In my view our attitude to these collaborators is far too forgiving. You don’t even have to be Muslim to realise that one of the most serious crimes you can commit in any country is to help a foreign power establish their authority over your nation. It’s called treason and the usual punishment for it is extremely harsh.

    That said, it’s true that if the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan pursued a no-tolerance policy against collaborators they would be jailing hundreds of thousands of people, which is unrealistic for a movement that is trying to win hearts and minds and rebuild a nation.

    But at the same time if our general attitude is one of forgiveness to traitors who are willing to betray their own nation, then this is a recipe for eternal Western invasion, occupation and subjugation.

    https://5pillarsuk.com/2021/11/25/ka...collaborators/
    Muslims need to have a less generous view of collaborators otherwise we will be giving the West a green light to invade, occupy and subjugate…
    “…foreign invaders and occupiers….” “… liberate their country from invaders…”
    “…eternal Western invasion, occupation and subjugation…”

    Really ? Just one thing missing here … ! The 911 attacks ! The US invasion of Afghanistan was a totally justified act of war for the Taliban for not handing Bin Laden and his Islamofascist comrades over to justice. Roshan Salih needs to get over his Crusader paranoia.

    Perhaps Roshan Muhammed Salih would like to leave the privileged position he has in the West and go live with the Taliban. Good luck to him. Only a matter of time before he would be crying and wanting to come back.

    Oh. By the way. I notice you سيف الله also live in the west. I presume you support Roshan Salihs view. Then maybe you should also go and live with the Taliban. Renounce your UK passport. I dare you too !
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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    Greetings and peace be with you Spiritlead;

    format_quote Originally Posted by Spiritlead View Post
    Really ? Just one thing missing here … ! The 911 attacks ! The US invasion of Afghanistan was a totally justified act of war for the Taliban for not handing Bin Laden and his Islamofascist comrades over to justice.
    The US lead invasion was totally unjust;

    During the War in Afghanistan, according to the Costs of War Project the war killed 176,000 people in Afghanistan; 46,319 civilians, 69,095 military and police and at least 52,893 opposition fighters. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civili...%E2%80%932021)
    Of the 46,000 civilians who died, how many of them were guilty of the 9/11 attack?

    9/11 can't be used to justify invading Iraq. They used the unjust notion of looking for invisible WMD's. This makes America the biggest hypocrite; because they have the biggest stockpile of WMD's in their own backyard. Hundreds of thousands died in Iraq, and there are two million plus refugees.

    format_quote Originally Posted by Spiritlead View Post
    The US invasion of Afghanistan was a totally justified act of war
    The greatest commandments are to love God and your neighbours. And to love and pray for your enemies. Self defence might be considered a justification for war. But this justifies Iraq and not America.
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    '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    Aoa. Really? Afghanistan taliban won? At what cost? Economy tarnished, social life destroyed, infrastructure demolished, food crisis at peak and deteriorating community .
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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    format_quote Originally Posted by Eric H View Post
    Greetings and peace be with you Spiritlead;



    The US lead invasion was totally unjust;



    Of the 46,000 civilians who died, how many of them were guilty of the 9/11 attack?

    9/11 can't be used to justify invading Iraq. They used the unjust notion of looking for invisible WMD's. This makes America the biggest hypocrite; because they have the biggest stockpile of WMD's in their own backyard. Hundreds of thousands died in Iraq, and there are two million plus refugees.



    The greatest commandments are to love God and your neighbours. And to love and pray for your enemies. Self defence might be considered a justification for war. But this justifies Iraq and not America.
    Hello Eric thank you for your reply.

    I disagree. The US was totally justified in invading Afghanistan (but not Iraq) following the 911 attacks. It was a matter of self defence. It they did not invade then Al Queda and Osama Bin Laden would have continued to use Afghanistan as a base to launch future attacks.

    I agree. The greatest commandments are for individual Christians to love God and your neighbours. And to love and pray for your enemies. However this is for the behaviour of individual Christians on a personal level. Not for governments. Romans 13.4 reads- authority is God’s servant for your good…. for rulers do not bear the sword for no reason. They are God’s servants, agents of wrath to bring punishment on the wrongdoer…
    Governments have a responsibility to protect and care for their citizens. Governments have the responsibility to protect their citizens from outside threats.

    Yes it is sad how many civilians died in Afghanistan. It is sad that is the fact of war. However it is the Taliban that needs to be held responsible here, not the USA. As it was the Taliban that was partly reposnsible for the 911 attacks.
    I agree with you about Iraq. But we are not talking about Iraq. We are talking about Afghanistan.
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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    Salaam

    Like to share, lengthy but enlightening interview on brothers Roshans experience in Afghanistan.



    Another interview on the same subject.



    format_quote Originally Posted by iammuslim98 View Post
    Aoa. Really? Afghanistan taliban won? At what cost? Economy tarnished, social life destroyed, infrastructure demolished, food crisis at peak and deteriorating community .
    Yes it is a victory no matter what the naysayers whine. Costly, no sane person denies, but sometimes thats the price one must pay to defend your society from foreign onslaught.

    Now they have to win the peace, its a long hard road, will take them decades to regain stability and sustained development. First prio will be to bring all sectors of Afghan society together and chart a course ahead.. Inshallah they will succeed in time

    Oh and the great defenders of 'freedom' and 'democracy' 'human rights' etc are currently economically strangling Afghanistan. No doubt to punish them for their disobedience. Not a new phenomena if you study history (eg. USA has done this a lot).
    Last edited by سيف الله; 12-10-2021 at 09:32 PM.
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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    format_quote Originally Posted by Spiritlead View Post
    The US was totally justified in invading Afghanistan following the 911 attacks.
    America has invaded around 50 countries since WW2. How many countries has the Taliban invaded?

    www.countercurrents.org › The US Has Invaded 70 Nations Since 1776 – and has invaded a total of about 50 countries since 1945.
    format_quote Originally Posted by Spiritlead View Post
    It was a matter of self defence.
    There are 50 countries in the world who could claim self defence against America. This makes America the biggest hypocrite when it claims self defence.
    Last edited by Eric H; 12-08-2021 at 01:32 PM.
    '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    format_quote Originally Posted by Eric H View Post
    America has invaded around 50 countries since WW2. How many countries has the Taliban invaded?

    There are 50 countries in the world who could claim self defence against America. This makes America the biggest hypocrite when it claims self defence.
    Hello Eric
    50 countries ! Really ! Please list them.

    You view of US Foreign policy post WW 2 is naïve and simplistic. Yes the US did some extreme things over this time but this was in the context of the Cold War with the Soviet Union.

    If it wasn’t for the US then the would be living under the tyranny of fascist Germany or Japan.
    If it wasn’t for the US then the would be living under the tyranny of the Godless Soviet Union.

    My point stands about Al Queda and the Taliban. The US had to defend it self from the Islmofascists after 911.
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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    Salaam

    Like to share.



    Blurb

    It’s been six months since the Taliban swept across Afghanistan to seize power in recently vacated Kabul.

    Last August, as thousands of petrified Afghans tried to flee the country, the West watched aghast and ashamed by the fate of those who had been left to live under Taliban rule.

    Now, six months on and the country has returned to a tentative reality.

    But people here are guarded and much like the Northern Ireland of the 70s and 80s, you don’t talk politics or religion.

    The government of the ‘Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan’, AKA the Taliban, has come to government at a challenging time.

    The West, in response to its takeover last August, blocked access to the country’s foreign currency reserves and sanctions against Taliban leaders have stopped foreign investment.

    They can no longer cover government salaries and aid agencies are picking up the tab for medical and teaching staff.

    With NGOs warning that 97% of the population will fall under the poverty line by the middle of this year, the Taliban government desperately needs access to the reserves currently blocked by the US.

    Abdul Qahar Balkhis, Talib spokesperson for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, says that the humanitarian crisis unfolding in Afghanistan is entirely man-made.






    Sensible. Reminds me of the phrase Swords to ploughshares. There is some disgruntlement amongst the rank and file about the direction Taliban are going but theres needs to be a middle path.



    More discussion on the aftermath of the Western occupation.

    Blurb

    Dr. Syed is joined by special guest Ustadh Moazzam Begg, former detainee at Guantanamo Bay, author, War on Terror consultant and human rights advocate to discuss the current events happening in Afghanistan.

    They discuss how the Taliban were able to reclaim control of the country, the far reaching impacts of the War on Terror and acts committed by Western powers, Ustadh Moazzam's own personal experience as a prisoner of war and much more!


    Last edited by سيف الله; 03-19-2022 at 10:49 AM.
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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    format_quote Originally Posted by سيف الله View Post
    Salaam

    Like to share.



    Blurb

    It’s been six months since the Taliban swept across Afghanistan to seize power in recently vacated Kabul.

    Last August, as thousands of petrified Afghans tried to flee the country, the West watched aghast and ashamed by the fate of those who had been left to live under Taliban rule.

    Now, six months on and the country has returned to a tentative reality.

    But people here are guarded and much like the Northern Ireland of the 70s and 80s, you don’t talk politics or religion.

    The government of the ‘Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan’, AKA the Taliban, has come to government at a challenging time.

    The West, in response to its takeover last August, blocked access to the country’s foreign currency reserves and sanctions against Taliban leaders have stopped foreign investment.

    They can no longer cover government salaries and aid agencies are picking up the tab for medical and teaching staff.

    With NGOs warning that 97% of the population will fall under the poverty line by the middle of this year, the Taliban government desperately needs access to the reserves currently blocked by the US.

    Abdul Qahar Balkhis, Talib spokesperson for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, says that the humanitarian crisis unfolding in Afghanistan is entirely man-made.






    Sensible.



    More discussion on the aftermath of the Western occupation.

    Blurb

    Dr. Syed is joined by special guest Ustadh Moazzam Begg, former detainee at Guantanamo Bay, author, War on Terror consultant and human rights advocate to discuss the current events happening in Afghanistan.

    They discuss how the Taliban were able to reclaim control of the country, the far reaching impacts of the War on Terror and acts committed by Western powers, Ustadh Moazzam's own personal experience as a prisoner of war and much more!


    Yes the humanitarian crisis is man made. Man made by the Taliban and Afgani people themselves.

    Why blame the West and the US for the humanitarian situation there. The US went into Afghanistan to defend themselves from the Islamofascists responsible for the 911 attack.
    The West spent billions on nation building after the defeat of Al Queda and the Taliban.
    The Taliban only managed to come back after the West withdrew. The Afgani people decided it was the Taliban they wanted and rejected the benefits that the West provided and would have continued to provide.

    So the question remains, why should the West supply aid to an enemy ? Of course it should not. Why supply further economic aid to people that has sided with an enemy ?

    If Muslims want to be upset then blame the lack of aid on the community of Muslim nations.
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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    Salaam

    Guess whos back in Afghanistan.



    Blurb

    5Pillars editor, Roshan Muhammed Salih, walks around a market in Kabul meeting and speaking with local Afghans.



    Woman continue to work



    Normality slowly returning.

    Last edited by سيف الله; 03-19-2022 at 11:34 PM.
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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    format_quote Originally Posted by Spiritlead View Post
    The Afgani people decided it was the Taliban they wanted and rejected the benefits that the West provided and would have continued to provide.
    There are people who value their freedom, security, peace, safety, and sovereignty more than money that comes with subjugation.
    | Likes سيف الله liked this post
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  20. #135
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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    Its wasn't subjugation. It was the US defending itself from the Islamic fascists responsible for 911. But if the Afghani people decide (and Im not sure most have) they would rather live under medieval fascists like the Taliban good luck to them.
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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    Salaam

    Like to share. Roshan heads south to Kandahar.

    Blurb

    5Pillars editor Roshan Muhammed Salih travels to Kandahar, a place where few Western journalists have ventured since the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan was formed.



    Interview with former prisoner.

    Blurb

    Din Mohammed Farhad, who was tortured by the Americans at Bagram base in Kabul and at Guantanamo Bay, tells 5Pillars he has seen the true face of the West. #Afghanistan #America #Bagram



    Taliban demonstrating its flexibility.

    Blurb

    The Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan has reluctantly allowed Nowruz celebrations to take place. Nowruz is based on Zoroastrian beliefs and is considered haram (forbidden) by the vast majority of Sunni scholars.


    Last edited by سيف الله; 03-28-2022 at 10:17 PM.
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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    Salaam

    Like to share.

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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    Salaam

    Forgot to post this, this is Roshans last video before he left.

    How can the Ummah help Afghanistan?

    Roshan Muhammed Salih looks at practical ways the Ummah can help Afghanistan stand on its own two feet as draconian Western sanctions and a lack of international recognition imperil the new Islamic Emirate.


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    Re: '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    Salaam

    No big suprises but gives good insight into how individuals and big business operated and profited in Afghanistan ( and Iraq)

    Here's Who REALLY Won the War in Afghanistan

    War is big business in the U.S. Here are some of the people who got crazy rich off the war in Afghanistan.



    Having said that this skimming of the top didnt effect US military performance as much, (compare this with Russian military performance in Ukraine where Corruption has had a negative effect)

    Again not new, theres a long history.

    x9bttocdfrx11 1 - '150,000 Americans couldn’t beat us': Taliban fighters defiant in Afghanistan

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=26O-2SVcrw0
    Last edited by سيف الله; 2 Weeks Ago at 08:23 PM.
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