× Register Login What's New! Contact us
Page 4 of 4 First ... 2 3 4
Results 61 to 69 of 69
  1. #1
    Array Junon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    UK
    Gender
    Male
    Religion
    Islam
    Posts
    3,137
    Threads
    315
    Reputation
    5899
    Rep Power
    66

    Geopolitics of Turkey - Europe, Asia (OP)


    Salaam

    Like to share, very informative

    Focus on Europe



    Focus on Asia


  2. #61
    JustTime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Gender
    Male
    Religion
    Islam
    Posts
    354
    Threads
    63
    Reputation
    23
    Rep Power
    11
    Likes (Given)
    36
    Likes (Received)
    82
    Geopolitics of Turkey - Europe, Asia


    يا قافلة الخير
    "The Persian aggression against Iraq was a result of the arrogant, racialist and evil attitudes of the ruling clique in Iran."
    -Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid at-Tikriti -
    العراق جمجمة العرب ورمح الله في الأرض



  3. Report bad ads?
  4. #62
    Junon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    UK
    Gender
    Male
    Religion
    Islam
    Posts
    3,137
    Threads
    315
    Reputation
    5899
    Rep Power
    66
    Likes (Given)
    447
    Likes (Received)
    505

    Re: Geopolitics of Turkey - Europe, Asia

    Salaam

    Another update

    Erdogan to seize Turkish opposition party’s bank stake

    President says legislation will transfer Isbank shares to Treasury

    Turkey’s president has said legislation will be introduced to seize the main opposition party’s stake in the country’s largest listed lender and transfer it to the Treasury.

    Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who exerts unprecedented control of over Turkey’s $800bn economy, has repeatedly criticised the Republican People’s party (CHP) for holding a 28 per cent stake in Isbank that was granted by the modern republic’s founder, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, upon his death in 1938.

    “Ataturk did not do this so the CHP could take it and use it. He did it so it would go to the Treasury. We are now bringing this matter to parliament . . . and we will transfer the stake to the Treasury,” Mr Erdogan on Saturday told a crowd in the city of Kayseri.

    The CHP has four seats on Isbank’s board and donates its dividends to cultural associations. The lender’s ties with the CHP are seen as a shield against Mr Erdogan’s meddling in the banking sector.

    In September, Mr Erdogan demanded an investigation into the CHP’s stake, sending Isbank’s shares and the lira tumbling. At the time, the lender, which has assets of about $68bn, said it was too important to the economy to be dragged into a political debate.

    No one was available from the party on Saturday to comment on Mr Erdogan’s remarks. Kemal Kilicdaroglu, the CHP’s chairman, urged respect for Ataturk’s legacy last month when Mr Erdogan threatened to investigate.

    The Nationalist Movement party, which acts as junior partner to Mr Erdogan’s Justice and Development party (AKP), has said it would support legislation to seize the CHP’s stake, which would secure the draft bill enough votes to pass parliament. The pro-government Sabah newspaper said on Saturday the AKP was already drafting the bill.

    Investors are unnerved by the extent of Mr Erdogan’s control over the economy since he won a June election to a new executive presidency that vastly expanded his powers.

    The central bank’s independence has been eroded amid his repeated call for lower interest rates, arguing the unconventional view that higher interest drives inflation.

    He has appointed himself chairman to the country’s sovereign wealth fund and named his son-in-law, Berat Albayrak, as economy tsar.

    Concerns about Mr Erdogan’s power grab contributed to a currency crisis that erupted in late July, driving the lira to record lows. It has lost more than a third of its value this year.

    https://www.ft.com/content/065bb752-cf03-11e8-a9f2-7574db66bcd5


    Mr Trump called the release a "tremendous step" towards a "great relationship" with Turkey.


    He insisted there had been no deal made with Turkey, but said the US would reconsider its "very tough" sanctions on the country in light of Mr Brunson's release.



    Mr Trump said the US felt "very differently about Turkey" in light of the pastor's release.

    When asked by a reporter if the release had any relation to the disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi in a Saudi consulate in Istanbul, the president said the timing was "strict coincidence".

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-45842735

  5. #63
    anatolian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Turkey
    Gender
    Male
    Religion
    Islam
    Posts
    1,732
    Threads
    46
    Reputation
    5453
    Rep Power
    74
    Likes (Given)
    321
    Likes (Received)
    1002

    Re: Geopolitics of Turkey - Europe, Asia

    The US Pastor Brunson was captive Turkey for around two years with the accusation of being a CIA agent who supports PKK and FETO (Gülenist terrorist organization). Erdoğan was just saying two months ago that America waged a financial war on Turkey because of this agent and no one could take him from us. He is released yesterday..This again and again shows what kind of a shameless hypocrite this Erdoğan is..A minimum of 90% of his words are lie. He just speaks whatever fits to the current situation of politics and easily U turns later when he needs.

  6. #64
    Junon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    UK
    Gender
    Male
    Religion
    Islam
    Posts
    3,137
    Threads
    315
    Reputation
    5899
    Rep Power
    66
    Likes (Given)
    447
    Likes (Received)
    505

    Re: Geopolitics of Turkey - Europe, Asia

    Salaam

    Another update

    Why dissidents are gathering in Istanbul

    A century after Turkey lost the Middle East, Istanbul is an Arab capital again


    REFUGEES, dissidents and émigrés from across the Arab world are flocking to the old imperial city which ruled their lands until 1918. In Mukhtar, a popular café in Istanbul’s “Little Syria”, outcasts from regimes that crushed the Arab spring sip coffee spiced with cardamom—and plot their comeback. They hail from Egypt, Syria, Yemen and other Arab countries where the Ottoman Turks once ruled. Some advocate peaceful means, others violent. “These tyrants will never hand over power peacefully,” says a Kuwaiti dissident.

    Istanbul may host as many as 1.2m Arabs, including many of the 3m-plus Syrian refugees in Turkey. A former presidential candidate from Egypt is there, along with Kuwaiti MPs stripped of their citizenship and a crop of former ministers from Yemen. Dozens of Arab websites, satellite-TV stations and think-tanks relay grievances back home. Istanbul’s Arab Media Association now counts 850 journalists as members.

    Most Arab states deny citizenship to foreigners and their offspring, even those born and raised in their countries. By contrast, Arabs may get a Turkish passport after five years of residency, or immediately if they bring in at least $250,000. “There they treat us like slaves,” says a Lebanese education consultant who took a pay cut to move from Dubai to Istanbul. “Here we belong.” Some Arabs arrive after failing to win asylum in less friendly Europe. “It’s more familiar, Muslim and closer to home,” says an applicant. Saudis snap up property in case things go wrong back home.

    Turkey’s political system is another attraction. Its democracy looks flawed to European eyes. But it is a paragon compared with most Arab regimes. Its president, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, whose wife is of Arab origin, still openly champions the Arab uprisings of 2011 and the Muslim Brothers who briefly ran Egypt until its current president, Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi, took over in a coup in 2013. “It’s the last corner of the Arab spring,” says Ayman Nour, once a candidate for Egypt’s presidency, who now runs his own television station from the city.

    These days hot Arab bands come to play in Istanbul. The city also hosts the biggest Arab book fair in a non-Arab land. Last month a school opened for Palestinians from Israel, the West Bank and Gaza. Ibn Haldun, a new university on Istanbul’s outskirts, offers scholarships to students across the umma, or Muslim nation, to promote Islamist values. Mr Erdogan’s son, Bilal, is on the board. A new Arab Council for the Defence of Revolutions and Democracy seeks to bring all the city’s Arab émigrés together. But after the disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi, a Saudi journalist, their haven may feel a bit less safe.

    https://www.economist.com/middle-east-and-africa/2018/10/13/why-dissidents-are-gathering-in-istanbul

  7. Report bad ads?
  8. #65
    anatolian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Turkey
    Gender
    Male
    Religion
    Islam
    Posts
    1,732
    Threads
    46
    Reputation
    5453
    Rep Power
    74
    Likes (Given)
    321
    Likes (Received)
    1002

    Re: Geopolitics of Turkey - Europe, Asia

    I was planning to write something regarding the so called pastor Brunson but I see you suddenly changed the topic .

    Turkey generally and particularly Istanbul became a popular destination for Arabs recently for both touristic and residential purpose. It is a democrasy with an Islamic enviroment and culture. So this attracts those rich ones who have the opportunity to buy a second residency abroad. This rapid move annoys the nationalists but they fail to see that the southern sea side regions have already been occupied by the north europeans for the same purpose.

    This country is getting more diverse each day but I am afraid my turkish people are not ready for this rapid change. We Turks are generally a welcoming people but if people violate our rules we can get a little tough.
    Last edited by anatolian; 10-14-2018 at 07:02 PM.

  9. #66
    Junon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    UK
    Gender
    Male
    Religion
    Islam
    Posts
    3,137
    Threads
    315
    Reputation
    5899
    Rep Power
    66
    Likes (Given)
    447
    Likes (Received)
    505

    Re: Geopolitics of Turkey - Europe, Asia

    Salaam

    Its important to respect and understand the culture you are in, I completely agree. I think it will be easier for for those who come from Muslims backgrounds.

    Post away on the Pastor, Id like to get Turkish perspective on this.

  10. #67
    anatolian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Turkey
    Gender
    Male
    Religion
    Islam
    Posts
    1,732
    Threads
    46
    Reputation
    5453
    Rep Power
    74
    Likes (Given)
    321
    Likes (Received)
    1002

    Re: Geopolitics of Turkey - Europe, Asia

    The problem is, not all turkish people care muslimhood at all. There are people who dont care Islam and/or muslim brotherhood. Turkish people are already culturally and mentally very diverse. We will see what this will bring us.

  11. #68
    Junon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    UK
    Gender
    Male
    Religion
    Islam
    Posts
    3,137
    Threads
    315
    Reputation
    5899
    Rep Power
    66
    Likes (Given)
    447
    Likes (Received)
    505

    Re: Geopolitics of Turkey - Europe, Asia

    Salaam

    Another update

    Blurb

    Turkey is re-calibrating its foreign and regional policy at a time when the Middle East is undergoing a major transformation. Russia appears to be doing the same. As both look for more influence in the region, their relationship will be at times cooperative and at times competitive.


  12. #69
    Junon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    UK
    Gender
    Male
    Religion
    Islam
    Posts
    3,137
    Threads
    315
    Reputation
    5899
    Rep Power
    66
    Likes (Given)
    447
    Likes (Received)
    505

    Re: Geopolitics of Turkey - Europe, Asia

    Salaam

    Another update. More likely to marginalise its influence.




    EXCLUSIVE: Saudi Arabia’s ‘strategic plan’ to take Turkey down

    In a confidential Emirati document seen by MEE, Mohammed bin Salman's scheme to confront Erdogan's government is outlined in full


    Saudi Arabia has begun implementing a “strategic plan” to confront the Turkish government, after Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman decided he was being “too patient” with President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in the wake of journalist Jamal Khashoggi’s murder.

    The plan is detailed in a confidential report based on open- and closed-source intelligence prepared by the kingdom’s ally, the United Arab Emirates.

    The intelligence report is one of a monthly series written by the Emirates Policy Centre, a think tank with close links to the Emirati government and security services.

    Entitled “Monthly Report on Saudi Arabia, Issue 24, May 2019”, the report is of limited circulation and intended for the top Emirati leadership. It does not appear on the think tank’s website. A copy has been obtained by Middle East Eye.

    It reveals that in Riyadh in May, orders were given to implement the strategic plan to confront the Turkish government.

    The aim of the plan was to use “all possible tools to pressure Erdogan’s government, weaken him, and keep him busy with domestic issues in the hope that he will be brought down by the opposition, or occupy him with confronting crisis after crisis, and push him to slip up and make mistakes which the media would surely pick up on”.

    Middle East Eye contacted the Emirates Policy Centre for comment, with no reply by the time of publication.

    Restricting influence

    Riyadh’s aim is to restrict Erdogan and Turkey’s regional influence.

    “The kingdom would start to target the Turkish economy and press towards the gradual termination of Saudi investment in Turkey, the gradual decrease of Saudi tourists visiting Turkey while creating alternative destinations for them, decreasing Saudi import of Turkish goods, and most importantly minimising Turkish regional role in Islamic matters,” the report says.

    According to the report, Mohammed bin Salman, the kingdom’s de facto ruler, took the decision to confront Turkey following the assassination of Khashoggi by a team of Saudi agents in their country’s Istanbul consulate.

    The murder of the Saudi journalist, a Middle East Eye and Washington Post columnist, created international outrage, in large part due to Turkey’s insistence on Riyadh providing accountability and transparency over the affair.

    “President Erdogan … went too far in his campaign smearing the kingdom, especially the person of the crown prince, using in the most reprehensible manner the case of Khashoggi,” the reports says

    In the document, the Emirates Policy Centre claims Turkey did not provide “specific and honest” information to assist the Saudi investigation into the killing, but instead leaked “disinformation” to the media “all aimed at distorting the image of the kingdom and attempting to destroy the reputation of the crown prince”.

    Riyadh had concluded that Erdogan failed in his attempt to politicise and internationalise the case and now was the time to mount the fightback, the report says.

    Both the CIA and leading members of the US Congress have accepted the Turkish intelligence assessment of Khashoggi’s murder.

    The CIA also concluded that Mohammed bin Salman almost certainly signed off on the operation, an assessment based on its own intelligence as well.

    “The accepted position is that there is no way this happened without him being aware or involved,” said a US official familiar with the CIA’s conclusions, the Washington Post reported.

    Since then, a report by United Nations human rights investigator Agnes Callamard detailed the difficulties the Turkish authorities had in investigating the murder and gaining access to the consulate building and the home of the consul-general.

    Callamard concluded independently that the crown prince ordered Khashoggi’s murder.

    The pressure begins

    Last week came the first public sign of the campaign detailed in the Emirati document coming to life.

    Saudi authorities blocked 80 Turkish trucks transporting textile products and chemicals from entering the kingdom through its Duba port.

    Three hundred containers carrying fruit and vegetables from Turkey had also been held in Jeddah’s port, according to a Turkish official who spoke to MEE on condition of anonymity.

    The number of Saudi tourists visiting Turkey decreased 15 percent (from 276,000 to 234,000) in the first six months of 2019, according to official data released by the Turkish tourism ministry.

    Saudi Arabia has approximately $2bn worth of direct investment in Turkey, according to the Turkish foreign ministry data from 2018.

    That year, Turkish exports to Saudi Arabia were valued at around $2.64bn, while imports from the kingdom stood at $2.32bn.

    Behind the scenes, other signals have been sent to Ankara.

    The Emirati report says “in a sign that the Saudi leadership has severed its relationship with … Erdogan and started treating him as an enemy”, King Salman approved “without hesitation” a recommendation from an advisory committee not to send an official invitation to attend a high-profile Organisation of Islamic Cooperation summit in Mecca.

    The Turkish president’s name was added to the list of those excluded from the summit, alongside Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani and the Emir of Qatar Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani.

    Eventually, King Salman decided to allow the Qatari emir to attend the event in Mecca, though Erdogan’s invitation was not forthcoming.

    The Turkish government is aware of the Saudi crown prince’s attempts to sever relations and is trying to combat them through keeping direct communications with his father, King Salman.

    A senior Turkish official, speaking anonymously, said the existence of a Saudi strategy to punish Turkey over its stance on the Khashoggi case wasn't surprising.

    "We are aware of what they are doing. It is almost public, to the extent that you could see their activities on Saudi-backed social media and Saudi state media,” the official told MEE, noting that they had openly called for a boycott.

    “Tourist arrivals are decreasing, while we are having problems related to Turkish exports. We are closely following the situation.”

    The Turkish official said, however, that Ankara does not believe that Saudi citizens are altering their stance on Turkey, despite the government in Riyadh’s efforts.

    “Istanbul, for example, is still full of Saudi tourists. Saudi officials should check the BBC’s poll on Erdogan's popularity in the Middle East. Then they will realise that they are failing,” the official said.

    Erdogan phoned the king on Thursday, raising the problem of Turkish exports being held at Saudi ports.

    Another Turkish official, also speaking anonymously, said Erdogan's phone call with the Saudi king was cordial and focused on regional developments, such as Syria and the Palestine question.

    The official, who was informed about the call, said the king was lucid and supportive of Turkish concerns with regard to Syria.

    In the same call, Erdogan invited King Salman and his family, including the crown prince, to Turkey.

    https://www.middleeasteye.net/news/e...ke-turkey-down
    Last edited by Junon; 1 Week Ago at 09:57 PM.


  13. Hide
Page 4 of 4 First ... 2 3 4
Hey there! Geopolitics of Turkey - Europe, Asia Looks like you're enjoying the discussion, but you're not signed up for an account.

When you create an account, we remember exactly what you've read, so you always come right back where you left off. You also get notifications, here and via email, whenever new posts are made. And you can like posts and share your thoughts. Geopolitics of Turkey - Europe, Asia
Sign Up

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 49
    Last Post: 08-13-2009, 06:03 PM
  2. Robert Fisk: War, Geopolitics, and History - 102
    By Skillganon in forum Islamic Multimedia
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-11-2008, 04:41 AM
  3. ...Only in Asia do you see 'this' stuff!
    By Pk_#2 in forum Halal Fun
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 06-02-2008, 11:34 AM
  4. Turkey’s leaders plan Muslim Europe
    By islamirama in forum World Affairs
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-29-2007, 01:07 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
create