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~Zaria~
03-05-2012, 07:27 PM
The Prohibition of Photography
by Hazrat Maulana Yunus Patel Saheb (rahmatullah alayh)


One of the greatest calamities of our times is the abuse of the camera.

In this day and age, with the easy availability of cell-phones, digital cameras, camcorders, etc. everyone seems to be in possession of a tool which has created an upheaval in mischief. …How many have had their names dragged through the mud or have been black-mailed, slandered or left humiliated and disgraced due to photographs taken and then circulated?

Photography is an evil which has been entirely misjudged and under-estimated.
Just recently, a brother related a dream to me, requesting an interpretation. I interpreted his dream saying: ‘It seems as if movies are being viewed in the Masjid.’
Within a matter of days, the interpretation was made apparent. We had a visiting ‘Aalim give a talk in our Masjid. I was sitting on a chair, near the front, when I observed three young boys very absorbed with their cell phones. I requested a friend to go to the back of the Masjid and see what they were up to. He observed that they were viewing some film with dirty, indecent pictures.رَاجِعُوْن اِلَيْهِ اِنَّا وَ لِلّٰهِ ِاِنَّاWe give our children high-technology at the expense of hayaa
(modesty), Deen and Imaan.


One is to have no shame and commit sins in the presence of Allah Ta’ala, but increasing in shamelessness is when one is brazen enough to commit sins in the presence of Allah Ta’ala, whilst in the Masjid, the House of Allah Ta’ala.
The same shamelessness is found en-masse in the Masjid of all Masaajid, Masjidul Haraam in Makkah Shareef. The objective of the majority visiting these days, is taking photographs and video recording, instead of engaging in Ibaadah.

Complaints - and it is even our experience - of flashes and clicks of the camera, seen or heard, whilst Salaah is in progress or whilst in Tawaaf.
There is a very dire need to explain that this is a grave and serious crime in the sight of Allah Ta’ala.

What needs to be understood is that photography of anything animate is a clear prohibition. It is Haraam.

It has been narrated from Hazrat Jabir (RA) that Rasulullah (1) forbade pictures in the house and he forbade making them.
Rasulullah (1) said: “Verily, of the most grievously tormented people on the Day of Resurrection are picture-makers.”[1]
There are, in fact, many other Ahaadeeth, which clearly prove this prohibition.


Why did Allah Ta’ala prohibit photography?

One reason is quite clear; that it was the origin of Shirk (polytheism):

Going down the passage of history, we find that mankind was introduced to idol worship due to shaytaan’s efforts in leading mankind astray. So due to his whispering encouragement, people began to draw and sketch their pious predecessors, thinking that their faces and images will be a source of inspiration; an incentive to also follow in their footsteps of piety. However, it was the means by which many began to worship those pictures, and thereafter carved such idols; and idol worship came into vogue.

Whilst this would have been more than sufficient for the Believer, it is no longer considered a worthy reason by Muslims who want to engage in the sin. Many say that there is no way that they would worship a photograph or even a sketch, let alone an idol.

My Shaykh, Hazrat Maulana Hakeem Muhammad Akhtar Saheb (Daamat Barakaatuhum) explains that one reason behind the prohibition is so that Allah Ta’ala may protect the respect and dignity of His servants.

Many a time, a person who was engaged in various evils is granted hidayah (guidance). Sometimes, this hidayah is such that he attains a high stage of Wilayah. The person becomes a great Wali (Friend) of Allah Ta’ala and even a Shaykh, and thousands of people throng to his gatherings. Now at such a time, if someone were to dig up pictures of his past … what embarrassment would he have to endure?

From Allah Ta’ala’s side, there is forgiveness of sins, on sincere taubah, to the extent, that all evidence is ‘deleted’ and Insha-Allah, the person will not have to render an account for those sins. However, if photographs were taken, then this is evidence which the person has produced against himself, and which cannot always be destroyed – especially if it is in the hands of others who wish to bring disgrace to the person.

My Shaykh mentioned the above reason, during an election in Pakistan, where a woman was a candidate in the election. She was blackmailed with photographs of herself in a compromising situation, so that she withdraws.

Further to this reason, we find that the porn industry and filthy films are all based on pictures. Islam nips the problem in the bud by prohibiting photography.
If everyone practiced upon this teaching, we would not have pornography, woman abuse and exploitation, child pornography, and the evil consequences of rape, insanity, suicide, incest, etc., much of which has shattered and devastated the marriages and homes of many Muslims.

Now thinking over all these harms, we should appreciate the prohibition all the more and show that appreciation by abstaining.

There is nothing but great wisdom in the prohibitions of Allah Ta’ala, with nothing but good for His servants.


[1] Sahih Bukhari






For every masjid that he brought to tears with his heartfelt duaas, and every person he helped guide to the straight path (as this sinful slave), by the will of Allah (subhanawataála) - may Hazrat Maulana Yunus Patel be granted the highest ranks in Jannah. Ameen.



Salaam
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جوري
03-05-2012, 07:42 PM
Originally Posted by ~Zaria~
What needs to be understood is that photography of anything animate is a clear prohibition. It is Haraam.
Are you able to get around without an ID, a Driver's license or a passport?
We're in fact capturing what Allah swt has created it is a reflection like looking in the mirror not improvising upon his creation.

88180
Principles of Fiqh » Jurisprudence and Islamic Rulings » Customs and traditions » Clothing, adornment and images » Images and image-making



If image-making is haraam, how come it is permissible to watch TV and videos?


ar - en - ur


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A brother told me that taking pictures is haram. I started searching in the fatawa of different scholars and I found that scholars have not agreed it is haram. What convinced me the most was the fatwa of Sheikh Ben Baz - may Allah have mercy on him. I believe all types of pictures are haram as well as keeping them, unless for essential purposes. I believe also that the one who accepts to be pictured is as sinful as the one who takes the picture, because he accepted.
On the other hand, in a fatwa of Sheikh Ben Baz he says that watching TV or video is not haram if it contains no munkar (evil).
My question and problem is: Is it permissible then to look at the pictures that contain no munkar? Just for entertainment, according to the scholars who claim looking at pictures is haram? Regardless the way they have been taken? And if it was permissible, then under which level of (Denouncing the evil) should we consider it? As pictures are munkar (Evil), and I should at least denounce it by my heart, then by taking it away of my sight, and moving away from the place where pictures are existing.
Also if anyone shows me a piece of video by mobile phone then I should avoid it? Please sheikh remove my confusion about this matter and tell me if I am right or wrong?.

Praise be to Allaah. Firstly: What you say about it being haraam to take photographs and keep them except in cases of necessity, and it being permissible to watch TV and videos if they are free of evils, is the view of a number of scholars, including Shaykh Ibn Baaz (may Allaah have mercy on him) and the scholars of the Standing Committee for Issuing Fatwas, may Allaah preserve them. Secondly: The confusion that you mentioned was answered by Shaykh Ibn ‘Uthaymeen (may Allaah have mercy on him), who explained that pictures contained on a video tape and the like are stored in the form of electro-magnetic waves, hence they were regarded as permissible by those who do not regard photographs as permissible. He (may Allaah have mercy on him) said: Images made by modern methods are of two types: 1 – Those that are stored in a way that does not have any tangible or visible form, as was mentioned in the case of images, such as video tapes. There is no ruling on these at all and they do not come under the prohibition at all. Hence the scholars who forbid photographs printed on paper regarded them as permissible, and said that there is nothing wrong with them. It was said: Is it permissible to film the lectures that are given in mosques? Their opinion was that this should not be done, because it may disturb those who are praying there, and it does not befit the place, and so on. 2 – Photographs that are printed on paper. But there remains the question: if a person wants to make these permissible images, then he is subject to the five rulings according to his intention. If he intends thereby to do something haraam, then it is haraam. If he intends thereby to do something obligatory then it is obligatory. It may be obligatory to make images sometimes, especially moving images. For example, if we see someone committing a crime that is a crime against a person’s rights, such as a murder attempt and the like, and it cannot be proven except by means of a picture, then in that case taking a picture is obligatory, especially in cases where pictures could tell the full story, because the means are subject to the same rulings as the ends. If we use this image-making to prove the identity of a person lest he be accused of a crime committed by someone else, there is nothing wrong with this either, rather it is essential. But if we take a picture in order to enjoy looking at it, this is undoubtedly haraam. End quote from al-Sharh al-Mumti’ (2/197-199). See also questions no. 10326, 13633 and 20325. And Allaah knows best.

Islam Q&A

http://islamqa.info/en/ref/88180
Reply

A-Brother
03-05-2012, 08:45 PM
Things Relating To Watching TV

TV - ADVERTS
TV - MUSIC - EVEN ISLAMIC CHANNELS CONTAINS MUSIC WITHIN THE ADVERTS
TV - GIRLS
TV - NON MAHRAMS - BOYS AND GIRLS
TV - INFLUENCE OF HARAM
TV - INPERMISSIBLE THINGS TAKE PLACE

That Why Many Say It Is Disliked To Watch TV

Allah Knows Best
Reply

Sothis Girl
03-06-2012, 07:59 AM
Does mirror haraam too? The reason picture, sculpture, including photography are associated with "shirk" or "polytheism" is irrelevant and outdated. At the time the Prophet lived, people can easily fell to shirk and polytheism when they're making living creature's sculpture and picture. The Prophet Muhammad pbuh didn't want the muslim fell the same way as the Jewish fell when they worshipped the statue of cow, and the Christians fell when they worshipped the statue of Jesus (and saints, to some). But now, pictures (digital and physical) are so common that we live and breath with it. Everything in Islam is basically mubah, unless the fiqh tells otherwise. I can accept if the painting of living things are haraam, but photography is like a mirror. How can you identify people's identity, if not by photograph -- for legal documents etc? How can police capture and identify the villains, if not by their photographs? Just because an ulama told this haraam and that haraam, doesn't mean it's true.
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~Zaria~
03-06-2012, 11:53 AM
Assalamu-alaikum,


Are there some situations in which it is permissible to make pictures?.


Praise be to Allaah. Making images and pictures of animate beings is completely forbidden at all times, except when there is an essential reason for doing so, such as a photo for a passport, or for identification documents, or to show pictures of suspects so that they will be recognized, or testing purposes, or when applying for a job, and other ways in which trickery may be prevented or security protected. In this case a concession is granted, only as much as is essential.

From Fataawa al-Lajnah al-Daa’imah, 1/478.

http://www.islamqa.com/en/ref/34904/photos

With regards to taking pictures for essential reasons - this is fine, as discussed above.....this is unanimously agreed upon by most, if not all scholars.

Picture-taking in other circumstances is prohibited.

One may ask, how is something that is prohibited, made lawful under the above scenarios?
There are other examples of this nature as well - e.g being able to eat pork/ drink alcohol - in a life & death situation, when there is nothing else to consume and only partaking of that to keep you alive.



The reason picture, sculpture, including photography are associated with "shirk" or "polytheism" is irrelevant and outdated.
Islam is a way of life for all of time.
That which has been commanded by Allah (subhanawataála) and His messenger (sallahu alaihi wasalam) - still applies today.
Not just for this issue, but everything else as well.


It is up to us to submit to that which is prescribed for us - as this is only for our good.
Imaan rests on submission.
Alhamdulillah.


Salaam
Reply

Muhaba
03-06-2012, 01:18 PM
i will read this article at home insha-Allah and will comment soon.
Reply

جوري
03-06-2012, 04:16 PM
Originally Posted by ~Zaria~
With regards to taking pictures for essential reasons - this is fine, as discussed above..
I haven't seen such allowances in your original post--Yours makes a complete prohibition of ALL ANIMATE OBJECTS & didn't seem very open for discussion. It is indeed important to reflect on just what that entails given Islam IS a complete way of life.That includes knowing what is going on in Palestine or Syria, being given a live lecture from one of your favorite scholars or even learning anatomy in fine details so that undergoing a procedure isn't a hit or miss but a precise science, or being granted visa to go to Pilgrimage etc or even in how you give da3wa to non-Muslims..

waslamu 'Alykoum wr wb
Reply

~Zaria~
03-06-2012, 05:55 PM
^ Assalamu-alaikum Ukthi,

Perhaps I shud of mentioned that the first post is from a talk by the late Hazrat Yunus Patel - and clearly is not aimed as a fatwa, or meant to encompass all details pertaining to this topic - but, it is intended to draw to an important issue that is affecting our ummah.

In a similiar manner as one would say in conversation: Alcohol is prohibited and haraam, pork is haraam......and we may not mention thereafter that there are extreme exceptions to the rule - the same applies here.

By not mentioning the exceptions, does not remove from the fact that making pictures of animate objects is forbidden.
And it is this, that we have forgotten (and I myself needed this reminder.....)

I hope this clears things up, insha Allah.


Salaam
Reply

جوري
03-06-2012, 06:22 PM
Ok, Jazaki Allah khyran..
We've people interested in Islam people on the cusp swaying here and there etc. not everyone enters these topics with the same level of knowledge hence I like everything to be clarified ..

:w:
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CosmicPathos
03-06-2012, 09:19 PM
Originally Posted by arachnide
But now, pictures (digital and physical) are so common that we live and breath with it.
That's not a good argument now, is it? Just because things are common and norm, it makes them right? One might argue, we live and breathe nudity, intermingling, so might as well accept it as norm, far more progressive from the barbarian cultures from 50000 years ago when Man was a hunter and a Woman the nurturer for his kids, somewhere in the caves when we had not discovered fire.

I dont do any portrait photography of humans. Couple of times I've taken pics of some poor kids but I've avoided human subjects in general. There are Muslims who are totally fine with all sorts of photography. So I guess it comes down to what you are personally comfortable with.
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TrueStranger
03-06-2012, 11:17 PM
Photography is a tool. It depend on how someone uses it.
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tigerkhan
03-07-2012, 01:27 AM
:sl:
to me this issue is same like "interest". as its in hadith in time near to end all muslism will be polluted with interest. today we see its ture, but that doesnot mean that we make it halal. we should avoid it as much as posible. i mean if a person can handle without having bank account he do so, to have no transaction with bank. bcz bank business is base on interest.
similarly we should avoid photography but where we have no other option we do it and repent to Allah SWT.
and Allah SWT knows the best.
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Ibn Abi Ahmed
03-07-2012, 02:25 AM
This fatwa/article/whatever it is, is so irrelevant that it's almost comical. It displays an utter disregard to Usul and practicality and clearly shows that the person giving the fatwa has no idea what photography is when he quotes the hadith of the picture makers. I honestly think that it's this kind of black and white, lack of awareness, backward (yes, backward) fatwas, no matter how well intentioned they are, are means that drive people away from the deen. To me it indicates that the individual(s) writing it and quoting it are afraid to engage modernity and the state of modern society and find a way to balance it with Islam and it's principles whilst remaining within the Usul, that they write reactionary pieces like this that are devoid of practicality and substance and in all honesty, a deep understanding of fiqh. The fatwa clearly fails to distinguish between photography as an entity and of photography, i.e. what it is being used for and when - they are two different things that require two different approaches and will have two different conclusions that are certainly not black and white. Rather, to find an extreme in the wrong, and then do the lazy thing and reply with an opposite extreme fatwa like this is not helping anyone. It simply does more harm than good.

Does anyone actually think this fatwa will be taken seriously?
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CosmicPathos
03-07-2012, 02:49 AM
how can you say that fatwas like this are causing ppl to leave the deen, and not Allah? is not Allah the one who guides whom He wills and misguides whom He wills?

If a person can leave the deen based on a fatwa that he/she disagrees with, in a way good riddance! As this person never understood the difference in aqeedah and fiqh/matters of daily living.

By the way, painting human subjects is not a gift of modernity. Yes, painting is different from photography, but both involve capturing human faces.

Prophet pbuh have forbidden to display pictures/paintings of living humans on walls inside the house.
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Ibn Abi Ahmed
03-07-2012, 02:54 AM
Originally Posted by CosmicPathos
how can you say that fatwas like this are causing ppl to leave the deen, and not Allah? is not Allah the one who guides whom He wills and misguides whom He wills?

If a person can leave the deen based on a fatwa that he/she disagrees with, in a way good riddance! As this person never understood the difference in aqeedah and fiqh/matters of daily living.
1) I said it is a means to drive people away from the deen - I never said it is the cause nor did I say leave the deen. This is a very important distinction.
2) Good riddance? God...whatever happened to the softness and gentleness that was embodied in the Prophet (saw) who used to grieve to the point of physical pain out of sadness and good-will because people would not accept his message?
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CosmicPathos
03-07-2012, 02:57 AM
Originally Posted by Muraad
1) I said it is a means to drive people away from the deen - I never said it is the cause nor did I say leave the deen. This is a very important distinction.
2) Good riddance? God...whatever happened to the softness and gentleness that was embodied in the Prophet (saw) who used to grieve to the point of physical pain out of sadness and good-will because people would not accept his message?
Prophet pbuh indeed fought those whom he knew had caused corruption.

If a person leaves Islam just because of a fatwa he/she finds backwards, and starts touting their "ex-Muslim" status, its representative of more sinister intentions than a mere disagreement with a "backward" fatwa. In my humble opinion.
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Ibn Abi Ahmed
03-07-2012, 03:03 AM
Originally Posted by CosmicPathos
Prophet pbuh indeed fought those whom he knew had caused corruption.
Great idea, let's fight everyone who takes a picture! [/sarcasm]

If a person leaves Islam just because of a fatwa he/she finds backwards, and starts touting their "ex-Muslim" status, its representative of more sinister intentions than a mere disagreement with a "backward" fatwa. In my humble opinion.
Probably, but doesnt take away the part where the fatwa has a false premise and is completely irrelevant to the entire world population.

Are you saying that the millions of Muslims who use cameras and take pictures sinful? Is it obligatory upon them to stop using a camera? Give me a straight answer.
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CosmicPathos
03-07-2012, 03:11 AM
Originally Posted by Muraad
Are you saying that the millions of Muslims who use cameras and take pictures sinful? Is it obligatory upon them to stop using a camera? Give me a straight answer.
yea it is kind of stupid when they are taking pictures in front of kaabah. It is annoying when they stop in midway and create issues for other ppl by blocking.

It is also stupid because I do not want to be in ANYONE else's pics just because I decided to visit kaaba. I also dont want images of my physical existence remain in anyone's hard drive once I am dead. Ooh, I forgot, the crazy Saudis have cameras all over the masjid broadcasting to the whole world. So I should I guess visit the mosque with a mask on.

As for sinful, according to my interpretation of Islam, yes they are. Excluding where it is a necessity such as ID cards and what have you.
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Ibn Abi Ahmed
03-07-2012, 03:14 AM
Originally Posted by CosmicPathos
yea it is kind of stupid when they are taking pictures in front of kaabah. It is annoying when they stop in midway and create issues for other ppl by blocking.

It is also stupid because I do not want to be in ANYONE else's pics just because I decided to visit kaaba. I also dont want images of my physical existence remain in anyone's hard drive once I am dead.
So because you are personally annoyed with other people's picture taking habits and think it's 'stupid' - because of that, it is sinful upon every Muslim to use a camera and they are obligated to stop using it?
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CosmicPathos
03-07-2012, 03:21 AM
Originally Posted by Muraad
So because you are personally annoyed with other people's picture taking habits and think it's 'stupid' - because of that, it is sinful upon every Muslim to use a camera and they are obligated to stop using it?
their rights stop where my rights begin. if them trying to follow their rights infringe on mine, they have an obligation to stop.

Islamically, I've told you, most traditional orthodox Muslim scholars in Saudi believe that taking pictures of humans for purposes other than education/ID is wrong. I follow more or less the same school of thought.

http://www.islamqa.com/en/ref/96832/photography

It is narrated from him (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) in several saheeh ahaadeeth that when he saw that ‘Aa’ishah had a curtain in which there were images, he got angry and tore it down and said: “The most severely punished of people on the Day of Resurrection will be the image-makers).
In another hadeeth he said: “The makers of these images – and he pointed to the images on the cloth – will be punished on the Day of Resurrection and it will be said to them: ‘Give life to that which you have created.’”

And it is proven that he (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) erased the images that were on the walls of the Ka’bah on the day of the Conquest (of Makkah), which come under the same ruling as photographs. If we accept that photographs are like images in mirrors, then we cannot draw an analogy because it is established in sharee’ah that there is no room for analogy when there is a text, rather analogy comes into play when there is no text as is well known to the scholars of usool and all scholars. End quote from Majmoo’ Fataawa al-Shaykh Ibn Baaz (27/442).

Photography is not only the reflection of an image, rather it is created by means of a machine that captures the image, therefore it is trying to match the creation of Allaah using this machine. Moreover the prohibition on image-making is general because it involves trying to match the creation of Allaah and it poses a danger to religious beliefs and morals, regardless of the tools used or the method in which the images are made. End quote.
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Ibn Abi Ahmed
03-07-2012, 03:26 AM
Originally Posted by CosmicPathos
their rights stop where my rights begin. if them trying to follow their rights infringe on mine, they have an obligation to stop.
Then it becomes your prerogative to tell them personally that you don't like what they're doing - it doesnt change the general ruling of photography and uses.

Islamically, I've told you, most traditional orthodox Muslim scholars in Saudi believe that taking pictures of humans for purposes other than education/ID is wrong. I follow more or less the same school of thought.
That's fine - I just have a problem with the way the article is written and it's premise/conclusion.
Reply

جوري
03-07-2012, 03:45 AM
The Prophet said: 'Make things easy (for people) and do not make them difficult, and cheer people up and do not drive them away.' (Sahîh Bukhârî, Sahîh Muslim)
although I wouldn't so much concentrate on the route of gentleness and kindness of the prophet so much as Islam being a transcendent, progressive religion that suits all people of all times..Do you think that if Khalid ibn Ilwaleed were with us today that he'd fight his battles with a sword or bow and arrow? or that he'd be standing open in a field to be taken down by a sniper?
Did the prophet in spite of telling us not to imitate the disbelievers send envoys out to see what is appropriate for modern warfare which included leather armors.. was the battle of the trench not originally a Persian invention?
Salman was to play an important role in the struggles of the growing Muslim State. At the battle of Khandaq, he proved to be an innovator in military strategy. It was he who suggested digging a ditch or khandaq around Madinah to keep the Quraysh army at bay. When Abu Sufyan, the leader of the Makkans, saw the ditch, he said, ‘This stratagem has not been employed by the Arabs before.’ Salman participated in all of the other campaigns of the Prophet thereafter. He was also with Saad in the conquest of Iraq. After the grand victory, the Caliph Umar chose him because of his knowledge of the terrain, to select the land upon which Kufa was to be built.
http://www.inter-islam.org/Biographies/SalmanfarsiR.htm

Islam goes with fitrah and Islam is yousr..
Moderation
The Prophet said: 'The religion (of Islam) is easy. No one ever made it difficult without it becoming too much for him. So avoid extremes and strike a balance, do the best you can and be cheerful, and seek Allah's help (through prayer) in the morning, and evening, and part of the night.' (Sahîh Bukhârî)

Not everything lies between porn and abstinence and although it is better to err on the side of caution, it is also important to fully understand the ramification of what we are putting out there..

:w:

Reply

Abz2000
03-07-2012, 03:56 AM
Originally Posted by arachnide
The reason picture, sculpture, including photography are associated with "shirk" or "polytheism" is irrelevant and outdated. At the time the Prophet lived, people can easily fell to shirk and polytheism when they're making living creature's sculpture and picture.
i don't agree with that take bro since it is still practiced and not an outdated hadeeth - the prophet pbuh brought with him the complete message.

there are many hindus who hang framed pictures of idols and put necklaces of flowers around them then worship them on the way in and out of home.

i disagree with hanging posters of people on walls and only put quran lettering and swords etc on the walls.
i don't however disagree (personally) with picz of loved ones etc in your photo album for memories sake and to show loved ones abroad, or looking at childhood picz and seeing how you've grown etc and remembering moments of happiness.
say for instance i had a grandmother in a different country and she wanted to see my children and i couldn't go.
i don't see anything wrong with switching on skype for her to talk to them or sending her photos to see how they look, it would be like her seeing them live.

or asking to see a picture of an enemy soldier etc,
sometimes people paste pictures of lost children all over the place so that they can be identified - this is for practical purposes and not for worship or display etc. the intent is totally reverse of idolatry.

what i am against is putting picz of people up on walls for decoration and especially venerating them.
do you know that there are people who have photos of their ancestors above the doorway and bow and clasp their hands for blessing on the way out?

the hadith on pictures really requires looking at context and just because it mentions inanimate objects doesn't mean that it's ok to hang up a picture of a stone or tree and worship it.
if i saw anyone bowing down in front of a picture of the ka'bah as an act of worship, i would forbid it or remove the pic - despite it being inanimate.
'Umar (ra) had the tree mentioned in the Quran - the tree of Hudaybiyah cut down because people were paying respect to it and held it in esteem as the one the Prophet pbuh took the oath of death from his (pbuh) companions from under. and the place which was at the centre of the truce which gave victory to Islam.
it is not forbidden to have a tree but when people venerate it - Allah's anger is stirred.

it seems that there is a serious lack of spirit in some of these interpretations - in that they stray far from word and intent.
Reply

CosmicPathos
03-07-2012, 04:35 AM
Originally Posted by ßlµêßêll
The Prophet said: 'Make things easy (for people) and do not make them difficult, and cheer people up and do not drive them away.' (Sahîh Bukhârî, Sahîh Muslim)
although I wouldn't so much concentrate on the route of gentleness and kindness of the prophet so much as Islam being a transcendent, progressive religion that suits all people of all times..Do you think that if Khalid ibn Ilwaleed were with us today that he'd fight his battles with a sword or bow and arrow? or that he'd be standing open in a field to be taken down by a sniper?
Did the prophet in spite of telling us not to imitate the disbelievers send envoys out to see what is appropriate for modern warfare which included leather armors.. was the battle of the trench not originally a Persian invention?
Salman was to play an important role in the struggles of the growing Muslim State. At the battle of Khandaq, he proved to be an innovator in military strategy. It was he who suggested digging a ditch or khandaq around Madinah to keep the Quraysh army at bay. When Abu Sufyan, the leader of the Makkans, saw the ditch, he said, ‘This stratagem has not been employed by the Arabs before.’ Salman participated in all of the other campaigns of the Prophet thereafter. He was also with Saad in the conquest of Iraq. After the grand victory, the Caliph Umar chose him because of his knowledge of the terrain, to select the land upon which Kufa was to be built.
http://www.inter-islam.org/Biographies/SalmanfarsiR.htm

Islam goes with fitrah and Islam is yousr..
Moderation
The Prophet said: 'The religion (of Islam) is easy. No one ever made it difficult without it becoming too much for him. So avoid extremes and strike a balance, do the best you can and be cheerful, and seek Allah's help (through prayer) in the morning, and evening, and part of the night.' (Sahîh Bukhârî)

Not everything lies between porn and abstinence and although it is better to err on the side of caution, it is also important to fully understand the ramification of what we are putting out there..

:w:
sister, come on. Comparing laser guided missiles with cameras?

Preparation for Jihad is one of the foremost obligations of a Muslim. Hence it only makes sense that we are supposed to utilize all resources to gain an upper hand over the enemy.

I dont see where layman photography comes in. Photographing enemies' general? Yup, great, for assassination. But come one, taking pics beside CN tower? Or worse, in front of kaabah just for pic's sake??? taking 1-2 pics for showing old grand ma grand pa back home, I understand that, but a whole frigging album of human elements? :SS In doing so, ppl rarely do ibahada in front of kaaba and focus more on taking pics.
Reply

جوري
03-07-2012, 05:10 AM
Originally Posted by CosmicPathos
sister, come on. Comparing laser guided missiles with cameras?

Preparation for Jihad is one of the foremost obligations of a Muslim. Hence it only makes sense that we are supposed to utilize all resources to gain an upper hand over the enemy.

I dont see where layman photography comes in. Photographing enemies' general? Yup, great, for assassination. But come one, taking pics beside CN tower? Or worse, in front of kaabah just for pic's sake??? taking 1-2 pics for showing old grand ma grand pa back home, I understand that, but a whole frigging album of human elements? :SS In doing so, ppl rarely do ibahada in front of kaaba and focus more on taking pics.
It is about usage always isn't it?
cocaine is bad right? can you think of at least one good usage for it? or its cousins from the amide group?

:w:
Reply

~Zaria~
03-07-2012, 01:29 PM
Assalamu-alaikum,


Question
my question is weather pictures are haram in islam
i know drawing eyes is haram but if i use a camera and took pictures with that be considered as haram
please can you varifiy weather i am allowed to take pictures or not
Answer
In the name of Allah, Most Gracious, Most Merciful
Assalaamu `alaykum waRahmatullahi Wabarakatoh

During the time of the Prophet صلى الله عليه و سلم there existed various ways of producing a picture; e.g. carving, painting, tracing, drawing, etc. The Prophet صلى الله عليه و سلم prohibited all these different types of pictures. In other words, the Prophet صلى الله عليه و سلم declared that pictures are prohibited and not the means of taking the photo. The ruling of picture-making does not change by the changing of the tool with which the picture is produced.

The invention of a camera merely marks yet another method of taking a photo. In order to understand this further it is essential that you understand the definition of a photograph.

The Oxford Dictionary defines the term ‘photograph’ thus, “a picture taken by means of the chemical action of light on a sensitive film.”The American heritage dictionary has defined it as “An image, especially a positive print, recorded by a camera and reproduced on a photosensitive surface.” The Websters revised unabridged dictionary, “A picture or likeness obtained by photography.” These citations prove that a photograph is a picture (and not a mere reflection). Therefore, they will fall in the ambit of the explicit prohibition which is found in numerous authentic Ahadith.

And Allah knows best

Wassalam
Ml. Ismail Moosa,
Student Darul Iftaa

Checked and Approved by:
Mufti Ebrahim Desai
Darul Iftaa, Madrassah In'aamiyyah

http://www.askimam.org/fatwa/fatwa.p...8956b3fb6c690d







I have a clear understanding of the ruling regarding taking photos and pictures in islaam...Alhamdlillah! but the thing is ...my immediate family and my inlaws are in distant places and they wish to see photos of my new born baby. please advise me on this...they are demanding and get angry if i dnt send pics.

Answer
In the name of Allah, Most Gracious, Most Merciful
Assalaamu `alaykum waRahmatullahi Wabarakatuh

It is not permissible for you to take pictures of the new born baby and to send it to your family members. The books of Ahadeeth are filled with warnings against those who create pictures of animate objects.
أن ابن عباس رضي الله عنهما قال أخبرني أبو طلحة رضي الله عنه صاحب رسول الله صلى الله عليه و سلم وكان قد شهد بدرا مع رسول الله صلى الله عليه و سلم أنه قال ( لا تدخل الملائكة بيتا فيه كلب ولا صورة ). يريد صورة التماثيل التي فيها الأرواح
(Bukhari pg570, Deoband)






Rasulullah (salallahu alaihi wasallam) has mentioned: “The Angels (of mercy) do not enter a house in which there is a dog or a picture (i.e. of animate objects)












عن ابن عباس أن النبى -صلى الله عليه وسلم- قال « من صور صورة عذبه الله بها يوم القيامة حتى ينفخ فيها وليس بنافخ
(Sunan Abi Dawood pg 329,HM Saeed )






Rasulullah (salallahu alaihi wasallam) has mentioned: “Whoever creates a picture of an animate object, Allah Ta’ala will punish him on the day of Qiyaamah until he will give life to the picture, which he will be unable to do”)












عن عائشة رضي الله عنها قالت: دخل علي النبي صلى الله عليه و سلم وفي البيت قرام فيه صور فتلون وجهه ثم تناول الستر فهتكه وقالت قال النبي صلى الله عليه و سلم ( من أشد الناس عذابا يوم القيامة الذين يصورون هذه الصور )
(Bukhari pg 902, Deoband)






Hazrat Aisha (radiyallahu anha) reports that Nabi (salallahu alaihi wasallam) came to her and in the house there was a curtain which had pictures on it. His face turned colour, he took hold of the curtain and tore it. Thereafter Nabi (salallahu alaihi wasallam) remarked: “Those who create these pictures will receive the most severe of punishments on the day of Qiyaamah”.











Explain to your family members that the Shariah does not permit you to send these pictures.













And Allah knows best

Wassalam u Alaikum
Ml. Rayhaan Docrat,
Student Darul Iftaa

Checked and Approved by:
Mufti Ebrahim Desai
Darul Iftaa, Madrassah In'aamiyyah

http://www.askimam.org/fatwa/fatwa.p...b10996ba64a0b0









ASSALAMALEIKUM

My question is : IS the taking of PHOTOGRAPHS ALLOWED,(I know drawing pictures of living things is not allowed -but what about taking photograph's of people etc.), can you supply me with some evidence please. I need this information quickly.- Inshallah.
Jaazakala hair.



Praise be to Allaah.

Photography (tasweer) means the taking of pictures of living, animate moving beings, like people, animals, birds, etc. The ruling is that it is forbidden on the basis of a number of reports, such as the following:

'Abdullaah ibn Mas'ood (may Allaah be pleased with him) reported that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: "Those who will be most severely punished by Allaah on the Day of Resurrection will be the image-makers." (Reported by al-Bukhaari, see al-Fath, 10/382).

Abu Hurayrah (may Allaah be pleased with him) reported that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: "Allaah, may He be exalted, says: 'Who does more wrong than the one who tries to create something like My creation? Let him create a grain of wheat or a kernel of corn.'" (Reported by al-Bukhaari, see Fath al-Baari, 10/385).

'Ali (may Allaah be pleased with him) said: "Shall I not send you on the same mission as the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) sent me? Do not leave any built-up tomb without levelling it, and do not leave any picture in any house without erasing it." (Reported by Muslim and al-Nisaa'i; this is the version narrated by al-Nisaa'i).

Ibn 'Abbaas (may Allaah be pleased with him and his father) reported that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: "Every image-maker will be in the Fire, and for every image that he made a soul will be created for him, which will be punished in the Fire." Ibn 'Abbaas said: "If you must do that, make pictures of trees and other inanimate objects." (Reported by Muslim, 3/1871)

These ahaadeeth indicate that pictures of animate beings are haraam, whether they are humans or other creatures, whether they are three-dimensional or two-dimensional, whether they are printed, drawn, etched, engraved, carved, cast in moulds, etc. These ahaadeeth include all of these types of pictures.

The Muslim should submit to the teachings of Islam and not argue with them by saying, "But I am not worshipping them or prostrating to them!" If we think about just one aspect of the evil caused by the prevalence of photographs and pictures in our times, we will understand something of the wisdom behind this prohibition: that aspect is the great corruption caused by the provoking of physical desires and subsequent spread of immorality caused by these pictures.

The Muslim should not keep any pictures of animate beings in his house, because they will prevent the angels from entering. The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: "The angels do not enter a house in which there is a dog or pictures." (Reported by al-Bukhaari, see al-Fath, 10/380). But nowadays, unfortunately, one can even find in some Muslim homes statues of gods worshipped by the kuffaar (such as Buddha etc.) which they keep on the basis that they are antiques or decorative pieces. These things are more strictly prohibited than others, just as pictures which are hung up are worse than pictures which are not hung up, for how easily they can lead to glorification, and cause grief or be a source of boasting! We cannot say that these pictures are kept for memory's sake, because true memories of a Muslim relative or friend reside in the heart, and we remember them by praying for mercy and forgiveness for them.

Taking pictures with a camera involves human actions such as focusing, pressing the shutter, developing, printing, and so on. We cannot call it anything other than "picture-making" or tasweer, which is the expression used by all Arabic-speakers to describe this action.

In the book Al-I'laam bi naqd kitaab al-halaal wa'l-haraam, the author says: "Photography is even more of an imitation of the creation of Allaah than pictures which are engraved or drawn, so it is even more deserving of being prohibited… There is nothing that could exclude photography from the general meaning of the reports." (p. 42, see also Fataawa Islamiyyah, 4/355).

Among the scholars who have discussed the issue of photography is Shaykh Naasir al-Deen al-Albaani, who said: "Some of them differentiate between hand-drawn pictures and photographic images by claiming that the latter are not products of human effort, and that no more is involved than the mere capturing of the image. This is what they claim. The tremendous energy invested the one who invented this machine that can do in few seconds what otherwise could not be done in hours does not count as human effort, according to these people! Pointing the camera, focusing it, and taking the picture, preceded by installation of the film and followed by developing and whatever else that I may not know about… none of this is the result of human effort, according to them!

Some of them explain how this photography is done, and summarize that no less than eleven different actions are involved in the making of a picture. In spite of all this, they say that this picture is not the result of human action! Can it be permissible to hang up a picture of a man, for example, if it is produced by photography, but not if it is drawn by hand?

Those who say that photography is permitted have "frozen" the meaning of the word "tasweer," restriciting it only to the meaning known at the time of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) and not adding the meaning of photography, which is "tasweer" or "picture-making" in every sense - linguistic, legal, and in its harmful effects, and as is clear from the definition mentioned above. Years ago, I said to one of them, By the same token, you could allow idols which have not been carved but have been made by pressing a button on some machine that turns out idols by the dozen. What do you say to that?"
(Aadaab al-Zafaaf by al-Albaani, p. 38)

It is also worth quoting the opinion of some contemporary scholars who allow the taking of photographs but say that the pictures should not be kept: "The angels do not enter a house in which there is a dog or pictures." (See al-Sharh al-Mumti', 2/198).

There are many bad things involved in the making of pictures. Besides the element of imitating the creation of Allaah - which is an accusation denied by many of those who make pictures - reality bears witness to the great extent of immorality and provocation of desires caused by the prevalence of pictures and picture-making nowadays.

We must remove or blot out every picture, except when it is too difficult to do so, like the pictures which are overwhelmingly prevalent in food packaging, or pictures used in encyclopaedias and reference books. We should remove what we can, and be careful about any provocative pictures that may be found. "So keep your duty to Allaah and fear Him as much as you can…" [al-Taghaabun 64:16 - interpretation of the meaning]

Photographs which are essential are permitted - such as those required for identity documents, or for identifying or pursuing criminals [e.g. "wanted" posters and the like - translator's note], or for educational purposes which cannot be achieved otherwise.

The principle in sharee'ah is that we should not exaggerate about what is necessary.

We ask Allaah to accept our repentance and have mercy on us, and to forgive our excesses, for He is the All-Hearing Who answers prayers. May Allaah bless our Prophet Muhammad.





Islam Q&A
Sheikh Muhammed Salih Al-Munajjid

http://www.islamqa.com/en/ref/96832/photography



How much more proof do we want?

Where is the problem again?

The fact that these commands are not to OUR satisfaction?
If Islam is SUBMISSION to the will of Allah, then why do we find it so difficult to let go of what WE desire?



Salaam
Reply

~Zaria~
03-07-2012, 01:43 PM
Originally Posted by Muraad
This fatwa/article/whatever it is, is so irrelevant that it's almost comical. It displays an utter disregard to Usul and practicality and clearly shows that the person giving the fatwa has no idea what photography is when he quotes the hadith of the picture makers. I honestly think that it's this kind of black and white, lack of awareness, backward (yes, backward) fatwas, no matter how well intentioned they are, are means that drive people away from the deen. To me it indicates that the individual(s) writing it and quoting it are afraid to engage modernity and the state of modern society and find a way to balance it with Islam and it's principles whilst remaining within the Usul, that they write reactionary pieces like this that are devoid of practicality and substance and in all honesty, a deep understanding of fiqh. The fatwa clearly fails to distinguish between photography as an entity and of photography, i.e. what it is being used for and when - they are two different things that require two different approaches and will have two different conclusions that are certainly not black and white. Rather, to find an extreme in the wrong, and then do the lazy thing and reply with an opposite extreme fatwa like this is not helping anyone. It simply does more harm than good.

Does anyone actually think this fatwa will be taken seriously?


Perhaps if you knew anything of the man who spoke these words - you may have reconsidered your above statements.

A man who, by the will of Allah - had turned so many hearts towards Islam, whose humbleness and sincerity is almost unmatched in todays aged, who was truly a living example of this deen.

And whose manner of life was captured by the manner he left this world - after just completing tawaaf, in such close proximity to the Kaaba - a death that we can only dream of tasting.

Allah (subhanawataála) knows better than any critic here, the contents of this servants heart.

Do not be so quick to judge, to mock and disregard.

You honestly do not know what you are saying.


Wa-aliakumsalam
Reply

Scimitar
03-07-2012, 02:24 PM
Sister Zaria, I remember when a similar thread was posted on WUP. In that thread, many had posted evidences from the fatwah of a few different mufti's regarding this issue - and after careful consideration of all the fatwas, we agreed that they were all right, according to the context they were meant to be understood in.

Al Haythm (Alhazen modern English) was the scientist who invented the first camera. He also did remarkable work on understanding how the eye works. He was also the first man to practice the cataract removal from patients. The tools he invented for this practice, are still used in hospitals today, many centuries later...

I was going to get involved in this debate earlier, but I stayed away because I wanted to see if this thread would go the same way as it did in WUP or if there would be some thing new coming to light here. Nothing new has been posted here - just a repeat of what happened in WUP, but this time round I find that a very rigid adoption of the fiqh has been propagated here.

You know, a thought you should consider is this: If photographing someone is haraam, then so should making a moving image of someone too, right? Yet, today we have Muslim TV channels, we have Youtube with Muslim speakers, we have islamic mulitimedia... are these all haraam now? really? Because I don't think so, I don't believe for one second that these are haraam. And ofcourse, we must also consider that the Muslim shiekhs who speak in these recorded lectures, also know the fiqh regarding the making of images - and their wisdom allows them to discern whether they are providing a benefit for the ummah or if they are leading it away from deen. They believe they are providing some benefit to the ummah, and therefore allowed the recording. Rightly so in my opinion.

As someone mentioned earlier, a photo is a captured image, of reality - and not some ones rendering by hand of that reality, not an 'artistic' version of it, not a misrepresentation of it... in this way, a parallel is drawn between it (the photo) and a reflection from a pool of water, or a mirror. Because that is essentially what it is Zaria.

Cameras didn't exist in the Prophet pbuh's day, and all images were artistic representations. And in those times, people were prone to taking images/carvings etc of made up entities and worshipping them, this was polytheism (shirk) or blatant kufr (unbelief) dependant on the case.

To play advocate, there are Hindu's and Sikh's who will put up photo's of their holy men and dress them with flowers and even make offerings to these photo's - this is also shirk / kufr...

But find me a Muslim who does this... We are not so simple minded and faithless that we cannot discern a futility from a benefit. Muslim's today, don't even allow family photo's to be hung up on display within homes, for fear of negating their tawheed. The same Muslim's watch television or browse the net, etc, read books, look at complicated pictures (yes, drawings) of anatomy for their doctorate etc etc etc... tell me, if these images were not made for the benefit of the human race, then why is it that today - the human race has managed to move so far ahead of it's pre-peer generations?

I honestly believe that photography is not haraam, as long as it is not used for vain purposes. If it is used as a means to help educate, or to provide some real benefit, then yes - permissible by every and all standards.


Scimi
Reply

~Zaria~
03-07-2012, 02:46 PM
Assalamu-alaikum brother Scimi,

If I remember well, the discussion on wup that you are referring to was actually a thread on the permissibility of watching TV - the transgressions of which are even more extensive than mere photography.

And as i recall, you had posted a fatwa from Mufti Ebrahim Desai as well - which actually supported the prohibition of this form of picture-making.


I somehow expected this reaction to this topic.

The fact is, it is not up to me, or us to change the above that has been posted - from scholars way more learned in this field than most of us here - who have done nothing more than quote Quraan and authentic ahadith.

For those who wish to deny this, and continue to merrily take photos of their loved ones, etc - so be it.

This was merely a reminder for everyone here, including myself (btw - the original post was emailed to me this week, as I am a subscriber to this website: http://www.yunuspatel.co.za/
As you may see, it is currently the featured article).


For those who wish to consider these advices, and spend some time introspecting, and insha Allah, make some changes soley for the pleasure of Allah Taa'la (as difficult as it may be for us) - Alhamdulillah.

May Allah guide each and every one of us onto the right path, the straight path, and the path that is free from doubt.


Salaam
Reply

Scimitar
03-07-2012, 02:52 PM
Originally Posted by ~Zaria~
The fact is, it is not up to me, or us to change the above that has been posted - from scholars way more learned in this field than most of us here - who have done nothing more than quote Quraan and authentic ahadith.
The same men also don't mind being video'd and having them shown all over the web... or even on Islamic TV channels... see my point? With their wisdom, they were able to discern that what they were doing was good thing, propagating Islam... and not a bad thing ie: singing and dancing or making you disbelieve...

The law of duality dictates a very simple logic: A good thing abused, becomes bad... but a bad thing abused can never become good. TV / Internet / Photography - dependant on how you use it, can either provide a benefit, or do harm... all dependent upon the intention. Times have changed, a lot. People have forgotten how to think using Common Sense... so much so that I cannot even call it common sense anymore. I prefer to call it Uncommon Sense, that's how rare it is nowadays.

Scimi
Reply

~Zaria~
03-07-2012, 03:57 PM
Originally Posted by Scimitar
The same men also don't mind being video'd and having them shown all over the web... or even on Islamic TV channels... see my point? With their wisdom, they were able to discern that what they were doing was good thing, propagating Islam... and not a bad thing ie: singing and dancing or making you disbelieve...

The law of duality dictates a very simple logic: A good thing abused, becomes bad... but a bad thing abused can never become good. TV / Internet / Photography - dependant on how you use it, can either provide a benefit, or do harm... all dependent upon the intention. Times have changed, a lot. People have forgotten how to think using Common Sense... so much so that I cannot even call it common sense anymore. I prefer to call it Uncommon Sense, that's how rare it is nowadays.

Scimi

Akhi, you will be unable to find images on-line/ in written material (as far as I can tell) of Mufti Ebrahim Desai and Maulana Yunus Patel - even though they have web-sites, audio lectures and youtube lectures (by Mufti Desai).

This discussion is addressed to those who are engaged in the abuse of photography - i.e. photos not taken out of necessity.

With regards to permitting a lesser evil, for the purpose of a greater good (dawah, education, etc) - Yes, Alhamdulillah, this is true.

And yes, we will find scholars who make use of these means.
Then again - not all are as comfortable with this.....as examples, those mentioned above.

In this regard, Allah (subhanawataála) is the final judge, SubhanAllah.

I just want to add at this point - there are far too many videos today, falling under the banner of 'Islamic education', 'dawah', 'awareness', etc. that do not take the seriousness of this issue into account.
The vast majority of these can convey the same message, without the need of unnecessary animations/ human imagery.
One may argue - that the 'impact' of the video will be lessened, etc.

And this may be so.

However, at the end of the day we should be asking ourselves: If our Prophet (sallahu alaihi wasalam) were here today, will he approve? - Will he be able to watch, or will he turn away?

And Allah Taa'la knows best.


Salaam
Reply

CosmicPathos
03-07-2012, 04:01 PM
Originally Posted by Scimitar
As someone mentioned earlier, a photo is a captured image, of reality - and not some ones rendering by hand of that reality, not an 'artistic' version of it, not a misrepresentation of it... in this way, a parallel is drawn between it (the photo) and a reflection from a pool of water, or a mirror. Because that is essentially what it is Zaria.
what about photoshoping captured photos and altering the "reality" or the creation of Allah by removing blemishes or all the other stuff.

how is this altering of photos different from painting?

even basic click of a camera involves altering reality. When you take a pic, you are not "capturing reality." You are altering reality with tons of algorithsm in the camera's software which alter brightness, contrast, color shades, and even the way you appear changing skin tones. So no, cameras dont capture reality at all. They only capture, in a primitive form, a sub-set of reality.

You can counterargue by sayign that even Allah created our eyes such that we dont capture reality, we only see between 400-700 nm. You are right, but thats how God created us. No comparison with what we created.

I am not against modern tech and cameras, heck I have a dslr myself. I am against needless human portrait photography. It invariably leads to professional burgeoning business of Muslim photographerss specializing in taking pics of male and female models, which only leads to fitna. And yea, wedding photography is the creepiest!
Reply

جوري
03-07-2012, 04:06 PM
Originally Posted by CosmicPathos
what about photoshoping captured photos and altering the "reality" or the creation of Allah by removing blemishes or all the other stuff.
If we're going to go into such ancillary topics then let me ask this.. what makes the mufti 'Maulana' do you not think it is haram to give someone else an honorific title that Allah swt has described himself with?
وَإِن تَوَلَّوْاْ فَاعْلَمُواْ أَنَّ اللّهَ مَوْلاَكُمْ نِعْمَ الْمَوْلَى وَنِعْمَ النَّصِيرُ

Wain tawallaw faiAAlamoo anna Allaha mawlakum niAAma almawla waniAAma alnnaseeru
8:40 If they refuse, be sure that Allah is your Protector - the best to protect and the best to help.
Reply

CosmicPathos
03-07-2012, 04:12 PM
Originally Posted by ßlµêßêll
If we're going to go into such ancillary topics then let me ask this.. what makes the mufti 'Maulana' do you not think it is haram to give someone else an honorific title that Allah swt has described himself with?
وَإِن تَوَلَّوْاْ فَاعْلَمُواْ أَنَّ اللّهَ مَوْلاَكُمْ نِعْمَ الْمَوْلَى وَنِعْمَ النَّصِيرُ




Wain tawallaw faiAAlamoo anna Allaha mawlakum niAAma almawla waniAAma alnnaseeru



8:40 If they refuse, be sure that Allah is your Protector - the best to protect and the best to help.
sister Maulana in Urdu refers to the one who worships Allah, has a close relationship with Him. It is related to the now derogatory Urdu word Mullah. Maulana does not refer to the Arabic word Mawla which means Lord.
Reply

جوري
03-07-2012, 04:14 PM
Originally Posted by CosmicPathos
sister Maulana in Urdu refers to the one who worships Allah, has a close relationship with Him. It is related to the now derogatory Urdu word Mullah. Maulana does not refer to the Arabic word Mawla which means Lord.
Mawla doesn't mean lord in Arabic be that as it may, what does Mullah mean?
Reply

CosmicPathos
03-07-2012, 04:15 PM
Originally Posted by ßlµêßêll

Mawla doesn't mean lord in Arabic be that as it may, what does Mullah mean?
Mullah comes from Maula Wala which means the one who has Allah, which essentially means a pious believer of Allah.

It is a derogatory term among the Pakis who are still slaves of British colonialists, who first gave the negative stereotype to the word Mullah.

The end result of human portrait photography? Such portraits end up on currency bills, which we keep so dearly in our pockets. Portrats of despots and leeches like "Queen" elizabeth.
Reply

جوري
03-07-2012, 04:20 PM
Originally Posted by CosmicPathos
Mullah comes from Maula Wala which means the one who has Allah, which essentially means a pious believer of Allah.
Ok thank you, then let me answer your other question with a question. Do you subscribe to the notion that there are colors not within our narrow range of electromagnetic wavelengths and that things as perceived by our vision or interpreted by our mind aren't always the complete picture?
Reply

CosmicPathos
03-07-2012, 04:23 PM
Originally Posted by ßlµêßêll
Ok thank you, then let me answer your other question with a question. Do you subscribe to the notion that there are colors not within our narrow range of electromagnetic wavelengths and that things as perceived by our vision or interpreted by our mind aren't always the complete picture?
yea of course, everyones visual cortex I am sure works a tiny bit differently. I added that in my previous post, in regards to our eyes. Eyes are however Allah's creation, as opposed to cameras.
Reply

جوري
03-07-2012, 04:25 PM
Originally Posted by CosmicPathos
yea of course, everyones visual cortex I am sure works a tiny bit differently. I added that in my previous post, in regards to our eyes. Eyes are however Allah's creation, as opposed to cameras.
And I'd argue that a camera isn't a creation rather an invention to capture the beauty of creation!
Reply

CosmicPathos
03-07-2012, 04:34 PM
Originally Posted by ßlµêßêll

And I'd argue that a camera isn't a creation rather an invention to capture the beauty of creation!
being an amateur photographer myself, I agree with you. I love taking pics of natural beauty of landscapes and skies. Problem comes with capturing "humans." Or painting humans. Or putting them on masjids or house walls.
Reply

Endymion
03-07-2012, 04:41 PM
Originally Posted by CosmicPathos
It is a derogatory term among the Pakis who are still slaves of British colonialists, who first gave the negative stereotype to the word Mullah.
Sigh....
Reply

CosmicPathos
03-07-2012, 04:57 PM
Originally Posted by Endymion

Sigh....
yea, they disgust me. Here they are advocating celebrating the Hindu celebration of Holi! Like what in the world?!

http://tribune.com.pk/story/346527/h...dye-can-bring/
Reply

Salahudeen
03-07-2012, 07:10 PM
I've spoken about such issues many times in the past but then I thought what's the point in taking part in discussions where scholars have differed, there's a difference of opinion amongst scholars on so many things in Islam, if we were to talk about every single one we would just debate all day, if the scholars of the religion can not reach a unanimous agreement, then I doubt us discussing issues on which they differed will change anything, because people stick to the opinion of the scholar that they follow. I think it's best to just present both sides of the argument, and then a person can choose to follow the opinion of the scholar who's ruling makes sense to him.

When we get into the realm of pushing one scholar's opinion over another I don't think it's wise for us. I used to have attitude in the past that only the opinion of the scholar I follow is the correct one, and everyone else is wrong, so I would argue with everyone who followed another opinion, till I realized, they have just as much right to follow the opinion of the scholar they follow as I do mine.

I don't even know how to differentiate between wrong or right opinions, so I just stay in the safe zone and let people follow the opinion of whichever scholar they wish to.
Reply

~Zaria~
03-07-2012, 08:34 PM
Originally Posted by Salahudeen
I've spoken about such issues many times in the past but then I thought what's the point in taking part in discussions where scholars have differed, there's a difference of opinion amongst scholars on so many things in Islam, if we were to talk about every single one we would just debate all day, if the scholars of the religion can not reach a unanimous agreement, then I doubt us discussing issues on which they differed will change anything, because people stick to the opinion of the scholar that they follow. I think it's best to just present both sides of the argument, and then a person can choose to follow the opinion of the scholar who's ruling makes sense to him.

When we get into the realm of pushing one scholar's opinion over another I don't think it's wise for us. I used to have attitude in the past that only the opinion of the scholar I follow is the correct one, and everyone else is wrong, so I would argue with everyone who followed another opinion, till I realized, they have just as much right to follow the opinion of the scholar they follow as I do mine.

I don't even know how to differentiate between wrong or right opinions, so I just stay in the safe zone and let people follow the opinion of whichever scholar they wish to.

MashaAllah, this is so true.


Im not sure that this is the case in this thread though - thus far, the only differences from the original post (regarding photography) have arisen from personal opinions, rather than any other scholars view on this matter.

Where there are differences of interpretation, e.g between the different madhabs - as you rightly mention, our differences here should be respected.


JazakAllah,

Salaam
Reply

Ibn Abi Ahmed
03-08-2012, 01:36 AM
Originally Posted by ~Zaria~
Assalamu-alaikum,
How much more proof do we want?

Where is the problem again?

The fact that these commands are not to OUR satisfaction?
If Islam is SUBMISSION to the will of Allah, then why do we find it so difficult to let go of what WE desire?

Salaam
:w:

With all due respect, what you've provided is NOT proof - proof is explicit statements from the Qur'an or Sunnah - not an individual's interpretation and cross application of certain texts and narrations. These interpretations, though respected, are not law and are not binding upon anyone to follow, they are open to mistakes and can even evolve from time to time. Disagreement and pluralistic understandings are permissible, even encouraged in fiqh - even more so in modern phenomena such as the camera (i.e. capturing light) which is an issue of ijtihad and has no precedent. You are mistaken in confusing a scholar's understanding of certain texts with what you are terming the "will of Allah" - they are not the same - especially here as there are other scholars of equal and higher repute who hold a different opinion.

We need to be academically mature enough to discuss these issues openly and critically assess topics with the intention of reaching the truth without accusing each other of religious dishonesty in one's relationship with God or following of desires.

Originally Posted by ~Zaria~
Perhaps if you knew anything of the man who spoke these words - you may have reconsidered your above statements.

A man who, by the will of Allah - had turned so many hearts towards Islam, whose humbleness and sincerity is almost unmatched in todays aged, who was truly a living example of this deen.

And whose manner of life was captured by the manner he left this world - after just completing tawaaf, in such close proximity to the Kaaba - a death that we can only dream of tasting.

Allah (subhanawataála) knows better than any critic here, the contents of this servants heart.

Do not be so quick to judge, to mock and disregard.

You honestly do not know what you are saying.

Wa-aliakumsalam
Again, you are confusing a critical response to the content of the article with a critical personal reponse to the author. I don't know who the author is, nor do I believe it matters very much (and I do pray that Allah have mercy on him as he is deceased). My issue is with the content that I disagree with and believe to be impractical.

Instead of claiming that I am ignorant of what I have said, I would hope you would give me a critical response to my points.
Reply

CosmicPathos
03-08-2012, 02:09 AM
Originally Posted by Muraad
:w:

With all due respect, what you've provided is NOT proof - proof is explicit statements from the Qur'an or Sunnah - not an individual's interpretation and cross application of certain texts and narrations. These interpretations, though respected, are not law and are not binding upon anyone to follow, they are open to mistakes and can even evolve from time to time. Disagreement and pluralistic understandings are permissible, even encouraged in fiqh - even more so in modern phenomena such as the camera (i.e. capturing light) which is an issue of ijtihad and has no precedent. You are mistaken in confusing a scholar's understanding of certain texts with what you are terming the "will of Allah" - they are not the same - especially here as there are other scholars of equal and higher repute who hold a different opinion.

We need to be academically mature enough to discuss these issues openly and critically assess topics with the intention of reaching the truth without accusing each other of religious dishonesty in one's relationship with God or following of desires.



Again, you are confusing a critical response to the content of the article with a critical personal reponse to the author. I don't know who the author is, nor do I believe it matters very much (and I do pray that Allah have mercy on him as he is deceased). My issue is with the content that I disagree with and believe to be impractical.

Instead of claiming that I am ignorant of what I have said, I would hope you would give me a critical response to my points.
in matters of religion, everything is haram till proven otherwise. Taking pictures/paintings have some antecedent in Sunnah where Prophet pbuh took off the curtains with pics drawn on it. It is up to you to convincingly prove that cameras and picture taking of humans is different from drawing pics with hands.

If you say that back then camera and lens were not available, then I can say that back then modern painting techniques, brushes and paints were not available. And that means even painting humans with hands is allowed and there was no antecedent for modern art and sculpting in Prophet's time. Prophet's condemnation of drawing humans only relates to then prevalent techniques.

and indeed, we welcome rational discourse. So far I have not seen one from you, other than emotional appeal to the concepts of pluralism. And honestly this appeal to modernity is getting tiring. Modernity has given us pathological individualism, how far do you say individualism is important in Islam? None. Communal rights trump individual rights, read any classical book on fiqh.

Modernity has given us beautiful music. Dubstep, chillstep, metal, electric guitar, electronic synths, keyboards. How much should we engage with that? There is far more evidence in Sunnah which condemns painting humans than that which condemns music outright. Why do then the scholars keep on calling music forbidden and photographing humans allowed? Music is reality too, it is everywhere. Why dont you make it allowed too? Actually, music is way more beneficial to the soul than photographing humans is. Read about classical Indian music, it is their way of worshipping God. Listen to Sarangi, it is hypnotic, mindblowing and otherworldly. How then you (or most scholars) call that haram and allow capturing humans (via painting or camera) to be permissible? Dawud (as) and his musical talents are known to us. My point is that if you are going to use the "modernity" card then where will you draw the line?

As for scholars of high repute, we have had our share of "scholars" from "prestigious" Al Azhar and Saudi tell men to drink milk of female co-workers so that they can work together.

salam
Reply

Abz2000
03-08-2012, 02:15 AM
Originally Posted by CosmicPathos
in matters of religion, everything is haram till proven otherwise.
that is not true, we are to use our intellect.
an example in context: the place of sujood is pure unless proven otherwise,


3:93 All food was lawful for Israel, except what Israel Made unlawful for himself,
before the Law (of Moses) was revealed. Say: "Bring ye the Law and study it, if ye be men of truth."

Quran 3:93

all the things that existed weren't specifically made halal for Adam (as), the forbidden tree was.

can you imagine the Quran going through every single act and deed and food and item of clothing or behaviour that is Halal?
Reply

CosmicPathos
03-08-2012, 02:17 AM
Originally Posted by Abz2000
that is not true, we are to use our intellect.
an example in context: the place of sujood is pure unless proven otherwise,
I am talking about concepts, not acts.

What does place of sujood has to do with concept of sujood? If you were to say that we should do 3 sajoods after every rakah in salah then its haram till you prove it. I am talking about that.
Reply

Abz2000
03-08-2012, 02:30 AM
actually it's ok to do as many sujoods as you like until it is proven that there are two.
it makes you a believer in contrast to a kafir.
and i am sure that there were many who did this until the Prophet pbuh taught them.
who would you have said was a believer, the one who did 50 sujoods or the one who did none?
Reply

جوري
03-08-2012, 02:37 AM
Originally Posted by CosmicPathos
I am talking about concepts, not acts.

What does place of sujood has to do with concept of sujood? If you were to say that we should do 3 sajoods after every rakah in salah then its haram till you prove it. I am talking about that.
Fiqh il3ibadat differs from Fiqh Al'adat
the first there's no disputation as it is a done deal with no ijtihad. Fast is this way, ablution is that way, prayer is that many raka3as for fajr or for maghrib. etc.
However the rest comes under the latter and that is very much open to interpretation and discussion.

There was a hadith where a companion was walking with the prophet and water fell upon him and he asked the people if it were dirty and the prophet PBUH said, you've made it dirty with your question, and that is what I understood from ABZ's post.

I think there's a consensus that where images can be taken for idols is a clear prohibition. But if you're doing it out of 'necessity' in whatever form then I think it is somewhat misleading to not include it when casting with such authoritative and compassing words as 'ALL' as in 'All images of animate objects are haram..

anyhow I think this topic has been hashed here so many times in many different forms and always a subject of contention. I'd really hate for someone to develop the wrong or an incomplete view of Islam from something so authoritatively final..

:w:
Reply

CosmicPathos
03-08-2012, 02:37 AM
Originally Posted by Abz2000
actually it's ok to do as many sujoods as you like until it is proven that there are two.
it makes you a believer in contrast to a kafir.
and i am sure that there were many who did this until the Prophet pbuh taught them.
who would you have said was a believer, the one who did 50 sujoods or the one who did none?
in regular fard prayer? I didnt know that I could do 10 sajood if I wanted to. :S
Reply

Abz2000
03-08-2012, 02:38 AM
«أَعْظَمُ الْمُسْلِمِينَ جُرْمًا مَنْ سَأَلَ عَنْ شَيْءٍ لَمْ يُحَرَّمْ، فَحُرِّمَ مِنْ أَجْلِ مَسْأَلَتِه»
(The worst criminal among the Muslims is he who asks if a matter is unlawful (or not), and it becomes unlawful because of his asking about it.) It is recorded in the Sahih that the Messenger of Allah said,
«ذَرُونِي مَا تَرَكْتُكُمْ، فَإِنَّمَا أَهْلَكَ مَنْ كَانَ قَبْلَكُمْ كَثْرَةُ سُؤَالِهِمْ وَاخْتِلَافُهُمْ عَلَى أَنْبِيَائِهِم»
(Leave me as I have left you, those before you were destroyed because of many questions and disputing with their Prophets.) An authentic Hadith also states,
«أَنَّ اللهَ تَعَالَى فَرَضَ فَرَائِضَ فَلَا تُضَيِّعُوهَا، وَحَدَّ حُدُودًا فَلَا تَعْتَدُوهَا، وَحَرَّمَ أَشْيَاءَ فَلَا تَنْتَهِكُوهَا، وَسَكَتَ عَنْ أَشْيَاءَ رَحْمَةً بِكُمْ غَيْرَ نِسْيَانٍ فَلَا تَسْأَلُوا عَنْهَا»
(Allah, the Most Honored, has ordained some obligations, so do not ignore them; has set some limits, so do not trespass them; has prohibited some things, so do not commit them; and has left some things without rulings, out of mercy for you, not that He forgot them, so do not ask about them.) Allah said next,
Reply

CosmicPathos
03-08-2012, 02:42 AM
Originally Posted by ßlµêßêll

Fiqh il3ibadat differs from Fiqh Al'adat
the first there's no disputation as it is a done deal with no ijtihad. Fast is this way, ablution is that way, prayer is that many raka3as for fajr or for maghrib. etc.
However the rest comes under the latter and that is very much open to interpretation and discussion.

There was a hadith where a companion was walking with the prophet and water fell upon him and he asked the people if it were dirty and the prophet PBUH said, you've made it dirty with your question, and that is what I understood from ABZ's post.

I think there's a consensus that where images can be taken for idols is a clear prohibition. But if you're doing it out of 'necessity' in whatever form then I think it is somewhat misleading to not include it when casting with such authoritative and compassing words as 'ALL' as in 'All images of animate objects are haram..

anyhow I think this topic has been hashed here so many times in many different forms and always a subject of contention. I'd really hate for someone to develop the wrong or an incomplete view of Islam from something so authoritatively final..

:w:
I do believe that in times of necessity Islam gives much leeway. We are allowed to eat haram if we are dying of hunger. I just cant see how taking regular human portrait pics as an art is a necessity?

salam
Reply

Ibn Abi Ahmed
03-08-2012, 04:03 AM
Originally Posted by CosmicPathos
in matters of religion, everything is haram till proven otherwise.
Where did you get that from? What's your proof?
Reply

ardianto
03-08-2012, 05:27 AM
Originally Posted by CosmicPathos
in matters of religion, everything is haram till proven otherwise.
Are you sure?

From what I know, Fiqh Ulama said, everything is halal unless there's daleel that prohibit it.
Reply

Muhaba
03-08-2012, 01:46 PM
I agree with the article that photography is haram. The Prophet صلى الله عليه و سلم said that the picture maker will get the worst punishment in hell and in these hadith he didn't provide details regarding what sort of pictures were haram. so that means that all forms of pictures / photos are haram no matter how they are made.
Reply

~Zaria~
03-08-2012, 06:45 PM
Originally Posted by CosmicPathos
Taking pictures/paintings have some antecedent in Sunnah where Prophet pbuh took off the curtains with pics drawn on it. It is up to you to convincingly prove that cameras and picture taking of humans is different from drawing pics with hands.

If you say that back then camera and lens were not available, then I can say that back then modern painting techniques, brushes and paints were not available. And that means even painting humans with hands is allowed and there was no antecedent for modern art and sculpting in Prophet's time. Prophet's condemnation of drawing humans only relates to then prevalent techniques.

and indeed, we welcome rational discourse. So far I have not seen one from you, other than emotional appeal to the concepts of pluralism. And honestly this appeal to modernity is getting tiring. Modernity has given us pathological individualism, how far do you say individualism is important in Islam? None. Communal rights trump individual rights, read any classical book on fiqh.

Modernity has given us beautiful music. Dubstep, chillstep, metal, electric guitar, electronic synths, keyboards. How much should we engage with that? There is far more evidence in Sunnah which condemns painting humans than that which condemns music outright. Why do then the scholars keep on calling music forbidden and photographing humans allowed? Music is reality too, it is everywhere. Why dont you make it allowed too? Actually, music is way more beneficial to the soul than photographing humans is. Read about classical Indian music, it is their way of worshipping God. Listen to Sarangi, it is hypnotic, mindblowing and otherworldly. How then you (or most scholars) call that haram and allow capturing humans (via painting or camera) to be permissible? Dawud (as) and his musical talents are known to us. My point is that if you are going to use the "modernity" card then where will you draw the line?

salam

MashaAllah. There is nothing more that I can add to this reply.
At present, we have 3 well-respected scholars who all concur on this subject (whom many here trust and refer to for other matters in deen.....except for this one.....) Vs. many emotionally-driven responses......:hmm:

It is now up to our brothers and sisters to decide where they draw the line, for themselves.


Originally Posted by WRITER
I agree with the article that photography is haram. The Prophet صلى الله عليه و سلم said that the picture maker will get the worst punishment in hell and in these hadith he didn't provide details regarding what sort of pictures were haram. so that means that all forms of pictures / photos are haram no matter how they are made.
And this is how simple Islam is.

The definition of a 'picture' or 'picture-maker' has never been as difficult, as it is today. ^o)



Salaam
Reply

Hamza Asadullah
03-08-2012, 07:33 PM
:sl:

In the name of Allah, Most Compassionate, Most Merciful,

There are separate issues relating to picture-making (taswir), hence it would be good to understand each issue separately and the Shariah ruling on it:

1) Drawing/Painting Pictures of Humans and Animals

As it is common knowledge, there are countless Hadiths narrated from the Messenger of Allah (Allah bless him & give him peace) that strictly prohibit painting pictures of animate objects, for example:

Sayyiduna Jabir (Allah be pleased with him) narrates that the Messenger of Allah (Allah bless him & give him peace) forbade the keeping of pictures at home and making them." (Sunan Tirmidhi, no: 1749)

Sayyiduna Abu Talha (Allah be pleased with him) narrates that the Messenger of Allah (Allah bless him & give him peace) said: "Angels (of mercy) do not enter a house wherein there is a dog or a picture." (Sahih al-Bukhari, no: 5609)

Due to these and many other similar narrations, most classical scholars are of the opinion that painting and drawing pictures of humans and animals is unlawful and sinful. They state that 'picture-making' (taswir) of human or animal life has been explicitly forbidden by the Messenger of Allah (Allah bless him and give him peace) and as such it will be sinful. Only Imam Malik (Allah have mercy on him) is reported to have differed with this position of general prohibition.

In one of his narrations, Sayyiduna Imam Malik (Allah have mercy on him), contrary to the other three Imams and most other Mujtahids, is reported to have stated that only those pictures are unlawful that are three-dimensional and have a body to them, such as statues and sculptures. A picture that does not have a body or shadow to it will not be unlawful although somewhat disliked, such as drawing a picture on a paper, cloth or on any other object. This is one of two positions narrated from Imam Malik, with his other position being similar to that of the vast majority of classical scholars.

The position of the vast majority of classical scholars is based on the fact that there is no distinction in the various Hadiths between a tangible and intangible picture. The Hadith indicating the permissibility of intangible and non-solid pictures refers to pictures of other than humans and animals. (See: al-Mugni, 7/7 & Takmila Fath al-Mulhim, 4/155)

Based on this, the reliable and mainstream opinion of the classical jurists is that picture-making is unlawful, whether by painting a picture on an object or making a sculpture. This is the position held by the three main Sunni Schools of Islamic law (i.e. Hanafi, Shafi'i & Hanbali) and also one of two positions related from Imam Malik (Allah have mercy on him). It would be better if one referred to a Maliki Scholar to determine the relied upon (mufta bihi) position of that School. As such, one should avoid drawing/ painting pictures of humans and animals.

2) Photography

In view of the above-mentioned one position of Imam Malik, there is no question with regard to the permissibility of taking photographs, for according to that position, painting pictures of human or animal life on a paper or fabric is allowed, hence camera pictures would hold the same ruling.

However, in view of the mainstream and majority position of classical scholars, the question arises as to whether photos of humans and animals fall under the type of picture-making prohibited by the Messenger of Allah (Allah bless him and give him peace) in numerous Hadiths. Camera photos were not in existence when classical scholars were discussing the issue of picture-making, hence one will not find an express ruling regarding photography in their works. As such, it was left to contemporary scholars to determine whether photos held the same ruling as that of painting and drawing pictures.

Contemporary scholars have differed on this issue:

a) The position of the overwhelming majority of Indo-Pak and some Arab scholars is that photographs of human or animal life are not permissible for the very same reasons that paintings of these are not permissible.

They state that the ruling on picture-making does not change by changing the tool with which the picture is produced. Whether an image is produced by painting it or using a camera, as long as it is an image of a human or animal, it will remain unlawful (haram).This is the position of Shaykh Mufti Taqi Usmani and most of my other teachers. It is, without doubt, the more precautious and arguably stronger opinion.

b) The second position on the issue, held by most Arab Scholars (from all four Madhabs) and some from the Indian Subcontinent, is that there is a difference between photos and the prohibited picture-making (taswir).

Shaykh Muhammad Bakhit al-Muti'i of Egypt, a 2oth Century scholar known for his knowledge and piety, wrote a whole treatise titled al-Jawab al-Shafi fi Ibahat Surat al-Photography in support of this view of permissibility.

His basic understanding is that the reason behind the prohibition of painting pictures (in the words of the Hadith) is challenging Allah in His Creating of living creatures. In camera photos, however, one does not produce an image through one's own imagination; hence one is not challenging the Creating of Allah as such. It is merely a reflection of a living being already created by Allah Most High.

These are the two positions of contemporary scholars on the issue. There are great scholars of knowledge, wisdom and piety on both sides of the fence; hence, it would be wrong to criticize anyone for following any one of these positions.

It is a matter of genuine and valid difference of opinion. It is not an issue where one may condemn another, and one must respect others' right to follow their conscience.

As you have asked about my personal stance, firstly I am by no means in a position of having a 'personal' opinion as such. I follow my teachers and learn from them. I have teachers in the UK and the Subcontinent who prohibit photos, but I also have teachers in the Arab world permitting them.

The position which I follow is that of my teachers who prohibit taking photos, for that is a more precautious and safe position. However, I have complete respect for the position (and practice) of those who permit taking photos.

As such, my practice is that I do not willingly pose for a photo unless there is a genuine need like for a passport or something similar. If I am asked, I politely refuse. At the same time, if someone is taking photos and I am also in attendance going about my own business, I do not go out of my way to prevent him taking my photo. Thus, if you did come across a photo of mine, it is probably because I may have been present in a place where photos were being taken. The recent photo of mine you have referred to was taken in the same context. I had knowledge that photos were being taken and that I may appear in one, but I did not willingly pose for a photo. I hope that makes sense!

3) Live Broadcasting

Shaykh Mufti Taqi Usmani (may Allah preserve him) and many other scholars have declared that live broadcastings of images do not fall within the ambit of picture-making (taswir). A picture is something that is permanent and static, whilst the image broadcasted live is not permanent hence cannot be termed a picture. A live broadcast is in reality a reflection of the actual image, similar to seeing an image in a mirror.

Therefore, if an image of a human or animal is broadcasted live, then this does not fall into the unlawful picture-making. It will be permitted to broadcast something live or view a live programme, provided the content of the programme is lawful (halal). (Taqrir Tirmidhi, 2/351)

4) Video Recording

According to Shaykh Taqi Usmani, that which is recorded in a videotape or DVD is also not considered a picture. In a videotape, the particles of an image are gathered and then re-opened in the same order to view the image. This is the reason why it is not possible to see the picture in the rail of the tape without playing it. (ibid)

Therefore, if a permitted and Halal event, such as a lecture of a scholar, is played and viewed on a videotape or DVD, it will be permitted, Insha Allah.

Note that the above discussion does not in any way relate to watching Television. Watching TV and keeping it at home is another matter altogether, for which a separate answer is needed. The many harms and evils of keeping a TV at home are known to all. This answer only relates to the permissibility of viewing a Halal image through a live broadcast or a videotape/DVD.

Shaykh Taqi Usmani (may Allah preserve him) sums this up in one of his Fatawa:

"The images appearing on live programs or recorded programs on television are not the pictures in the strict sense envisaged in the Ahadith of the Holy Prophet (Sall-Allahu alayhi wa sallam) unless they are printed in a durable form on paper or on any other object. But the basic reason why Muslims are advised not to keep TV sets in their homes is that most of the programs broadcast on the TV channels contain impermissible elements." (Taken from the al-Balagh website, http://www.albalagh.net/qa/video_chips.shtml)

And Allah knows best

Sheikh Mufti Muhammad ibn Adam al-Kawthari
Darul Iftaa, Leicester, UK

Source: http://spa.qibla.com/issue_view.asp?ID=9334


In conclusion we must be tolerant to differences of opinions amongst the scholars and just because we may disagree with a scholarly position for whatever reason then that does not give us a right to mock that scholarly position.

The scholars of the past and present accepted differences of opinion then who are we to mock a certain position when we have know where near the adequate amount of knowledge to be able to do so?

The original article which was by the great late Hadhrat Sheikh Yunus Patel (Ra) who was responsible for spreading Islam throughout South Africa and it is because of him that Islam is still spreading throughout South Africa like wild fire.I posted a thread about his demise a while ago and i would urge anyone to read it and make dua for him:

The demise of the great Mawlana Yunus Patel

http://www.islamicboard.com/islamic-...th-africa.html


As the Sheikh in the fatwa i posted above summed up very well, both opinions are valid and it is wrong to criticise anyone who follows either opinion, but as always when there is a major difference of opinion it is piety to avoid it if one can, but if one chooses to follow either opinion then they are not blameworthy for that. That concludes this thread.

And Allah knows best in all matters
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